Bipartisanship

bipartisanbi-partisanbipartisan coalitionbipartisan supportbipartisan billbipartisan compromisesbipartisan Congressbipartisan politicsboth sides of the aisleboth the Democratic and Republican parties
Bipartisanship, sometimes referred to as nonpartisanship, is a political situation, usually in the context of a two-party system (especially those of the United States and some other western countries), in which opposing political parties find common ground through compromise.wikipedia
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Two-party system

two party systemmajority partytwo major parties
Bipartisanship, sometimes referred to as nonpartisanship, is a political situation, usually in the context of a two-party system (especially those of the United States and some other western countries), in which opposing political parties find common ground through compromise. According to political analyst James Fallows in The Atlantic (based on a "note from someone with many decades' experience in national politics"), bipartisanship is a phenomenon belonging to a two-party system such as the political system of the United States and does not apply to a parliamentary system (such as Great Britain) since the minority party is not involved in helping write legislation or voting for it.
Furthermore, the Lebanese Parliament is mainly made up of two bipartisan alliances.

Partisan (politics)

partisanpartisanshipmulti-partisan
This is in contrast to partisanship, where an individual or political party only adheres to their interests without compromise.

Postpartisan

post-partisanpost-partisanship
This interpretation brings bipartisanship closer to the more applied notion of postpartisan decision-making; a solution-focused approach that creates a governance model with third-party arbiters used to detect bias.
Seeman distinguishes between bipartisanship and postpartisanship.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
In 2010, the minority party has the ability to "discipline its ranks" so that none join the majority, and this situation in the Congress is unprecedented, according to Fallows.
Congress has alternated between periods of constructive cooperation and compromise between parties, known as bipartisanship, and periods of deep political polarization and fierce infighting, known as partisanship.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Bipartisanship, sometimes referred to as nonpartisanship, is a political situation, usually in the context of a two-party system (especially those of the United States and some other western countries), in which opposing political parties find common ground through compromise. According to political analyst James Fallows in The Atlantic (based on a "note from someone with many decades' experience in national politics"), bipartisanship is a phenomenon belonging to a two-party system such as the political system of the United States and does not apply to a parliamentary system (such as Great Britain) since the minority party is not involved in helping write legislation or voting for it.

Compromise

compromisedcompromisesFlexibility
Bipartisanship, sometimes referred to as nonpartisanship, is a political situation, usually in the context of a two-party system (especially those of the United States and some other western countries), in which opposing political parties find common ground through compromise. Often, compromises are called bipartisan if they reconcile the desires of both parties from an original version of legislation or other proposal.

Political philosophy

political theorypolitical philosopherpolitical theorist
It has been debated among political theorists however that in practice, each party advances their own political agenda at the expense of the other party because of the conflicting ideologies.

Political agenda

agendaagendasControl the Agenda
It has been debated among political theorists however that in practice, each party advances their own political agenda at the expense of the other party because of the conflicting ideologies.

Ideology

ideologicalideologiespolitical ideology
It has been debated among political theorists however that in practice, each party advances their own political agenda at the expense of the other party because of the conflicting ideologies.

Bill (law)

billbillslegislation
The adjective bipartisan can refer to any bill, act, resolution, or other political act in which both of the two major political parties agree about all or many parts of a political choice.

Act of Congress

Public LawactActs of Congress
The adjective bipartisan can refer to any bill, act, resolution, or other political act in which both of the two major political parties agree about all or many parts of a political choice.

Resolution (law)

resolutionresolutionsparliamentary resolution
The adjective bipartisan can refer to any bill, act, resolution, or other political act in which both of the two major political parties agree about all or many parts of a political choice.

Politics

politicalpoliticianpolitically
The adjective bipartisan can refer to any bill, act, resolution, or other political act in which both of the two major political parties agree about all or many parts of a political choice.

Political party

political partiespartyparties
Bipartisanship, sometimes referred to as nonpartisanship, is a political situation, usually in the context of a two-party system (especially those of the United States and some other western countries), in which opposing political parties find common ground through compromise. The adjective bipartisan can refer to any bill, act, resolution, or other political act in which both of the two major political parties agree about all or many parts of a political choice.

Legislation

legislativelegislatelegislative act
Often, compromises are called bipartisan if they reconcile the desires of both parties from an original version of legislation or other proposal.

Gridlock (politics)

gridlockpolitical gridlocklegislative gridlock
Failure to attain bipartisan support in such a system can easily lead to gridlock, often angering each other and their constituencies.

Electoral district

constituencyconstituenciesdistrict magnitude
Failure to attain bipartisan support in such a system can easily lead to gridlock, often angering each other and their constituencies.

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesNYT
An analysis in The New York Times in March 2010 suggested that the present state of American politics is marked by oppositional politics which has left the voters cynical about the process.

The Christian Science Monitor

Christian Science MonitorCSMCS Monitor
Bipartisanship requires "hard work", is "sometimes dull", and entails trying to find "common ground" but enables "serious problem solving", according to editorial writers at the Christian Science Monitor in 2010.

James Fallows

Fallows, JamesJames M. Fallows
According to political analyst James Fallows in The Atlantic (based on a "note from someone with many decades' experience in national politics"), bipartisanship is a phenomenon belonging to a two-party system such as the political system of the United States and does not apply to a parliamentary system (such as Great Britain) since the minority party is not involved in helping write legislation or voting for it.

The Atlantic

The Atlantic MonthlyAtlantic MonthlyAtlantic
According to political analyst James Fallows in The Atlantic (based on a "note from someone with many decades' experience in national politics"), bipartisanship is a phenomenon belonging to a two-party system such as the political system of the United States and does not apply to a parliamentary system (such as Great Britain) since the minority party is not involved in helping write legislation or voting for it.

Parliamentary system

parliamentaryparliamentarismparliamentary democracy
According to political analyst James Fallows in The Atlantic (based on a "note from someone with many decades' experience in national politics"), bipartisanship is a phenomenon belonging to a two-party system such as the political system of the United States and does not apply to a parliamentary system (such as Great Britain) since the minority party is not involved in helping write legislation or voting for it.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
According to political analyst James Fallows in The Atlantic (based on a "note from someone with many decades' experience in national politics"), bipartisanship is a phenomenon belonging to a two-party system such as the political system of the United States and does not apply to a parliamentary system (such as Great Britain) since the minority party is not involved in helping write legislation or voting for it.

Anne Applebaum

Applebaum, Anne
However, analyst Anne Applebaum in The Washington Post suggested that partisanship had been rampant in the United Kingdom and described it as "a country in which the government and the opposition glower at each other from opposite sides of the House of Commons, in which backbenchers jeer when their opponents speak."

The Washington Post

Washington Postwashingtonpost.comWashington Post Magazine
However, analyst Anne Applebaum in The Washington Post suggested that partisanship had been rampant in the United Kingdom and described it as "a country in which the government and the opposition glower at each other from opposite sides of the House of Commons, in which backbenchers jeer when their opponents speak."