Bishop (chess)

bishopbishopschess bishopBchess piecegood" rather than "badwhite bishop
A bishop is a piece in the board game of chess.wikipedia
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Chess

chess playerchess gamewestern chess
A bishop is a piece in the board game of chess.
Each player begins with 16 pieces: one king, one queen, two rooks, two knights, two bishops, and eight pawns.

Chess piece

piecepieceschess pieces
A bishop is a piece in the board game of chess.
2 bishops

The exchange (chess)

the exchangeexchangeexchange sacrifice
A rook is generally worth about two pawns more than a bishop (see Chess piece relative value and the exchange).
The exchange in chess refers to a situation in which one player loses a minor piece (i.e. a bishop or knight) but captures the opponent's rook.

Rook (chess)

rookrookschess rook
The bishop has access to only half of the squares on the board, whereas all squares of the board are accessible to the rook.
In general, rooks are stronger than bishops or knights (which are called minor pieces) and are considered greater in value than either of those pieces by nearly two pawns but less valuable than two minor pieces by approximately a pawn.

Chess endgame

endgameendgamesending
Bishops usually gain in relative strength towards the endgame as more pieces are captured and more open lines become available on which they can operate. In an endgame with a bishop, in some cases the bishop is the "wrong bishop", meaning that it is on the wrong color of square for some purpose (usually promoting a pawn).
Usually in the endgame, the stronger side (the one with more using the standard piece point count system) should try to exchange pieces (knights, bishops, rooks, and queens), while avoiding the exchange of pawns.

Queen (chess)

queenqueenschess queen
One starts between the and the king, the other between the and the queen.
The queen can be moved any number of unoccupied squares in a straight line vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, thus combining the moves of the rook and bishop.

Two knights endgame

Troitsky linetwo knightstwo knights versus a pawn
Two bishops and king can force checkmate against a lone king, whereas two knights cannot.
In contrast to a king plus two bishops (on opposite-colored squares), or a bishop and a knight, a king and two knights cannot force checkmate against a lone king.

Knight (chess)

knightknightsKnight's Move
Bishops, like all other pieces except the knight, cannot jump over other pieces.
Moreover, it takes more moves for an uncentralized knight to switch operation to the opposite side of the board than an uncentralized bishop, rook, or queen.

Bishop and knight checkmate

bishop and knightbishop and knight versus lone kingbishop, knight, and king versus lone king
A bishop and knight can force mate, but with far greater difficulty than two bishops.
The bishop and knight checkmate in chess is the checkmate of a lone king which can be forced by a bishop, knight, and king.

King (chess)

kingkingschess king
One starts between the and the king, the other between the and the queen.
As a result, opposing kings may never occupy adjacent squares (see opposition), but the king can give discovered check by unmasking a bishop, rook, or queen.

Opposite-colored bishops endgame

bishops on opposite colorsopposite-coloured bishops endgamebishops of opposite colors
In addition, having a "bad" bishop may be advantageous in an opposite-colored bishops endgame.
The opposite-colored bishops endgame is a chess endgame in which each side has a single bishop, but the bishops reside on opposite-colored squares on the chessboard, thus cannot attack or block each other.

Fianchetto

rule the diagonal
A bishop may be fianchettoed, for example after moving the g2 pawn to g3 and the bishop on f1 to g2. This can form a strong defense for the castled king on g1 and the bishop can often exert strong pressure on the long diagonal (here h1–a8).
In chess, the fianchetto ( "little flank") is a pattern of development wherein a bishop is developed to the second rank of the adjacent knight file, the knight pawn having been moved one or two squares forward.

Skewer (chess)

skewerskewersskewering
In certain positions a bishop can by itself lose a move (see triangulation and tempo), while a knight can never do so. The bishop is capable of skewering or pinning a piece, while the knight can do neither.
Only pieces that can move an indefinite number of squares in a horizontal, vertical, or diagonal line (i.e. bishops, rooks, and queens) can skewer; kings, knights, and pawns cannot.

Fork (chess)

forkforkingforks
Less experienced players tend to underrate the bishop compared to the knight because the knight can reach all squares and is more adept at forking.
Besides attacking pieces, a target of a fork can be a direct mating threat (for example, attacking an unprotected knight while simultaneously setting up a battery of queen and bishop to threaten mate).

Chess piece relative value

pointsvalueschess piece value
A rook is generally worth about two pawns more than a bishop (see Chess piece relative value and the exchange).

Checkmate

matecheckmatingmates
Two bishops and king can force checkmate against a lone king, whereas two knights cannot. Also, a king and rook can force checkmate against a lone king, while a king and bishop cannot.
There are four fundamental checkmates when one side has only his king and the other side has only the minimum needed to force checkmate, i.e. (1) one queen, (2) one rook, (3) two bishops on opposite-colored squares, or (4) a bishop and a knight.

Promotion (chess)

promotionpromoteunderpromotion
In an endgame with a bishop, in some cases the bishop is the "wrong bishop", meaning that it is on the wrong color of square for some purpose (usually promoting a pawn).
Promotion is a chess rule that requires a pawn that reaches its eighth to be immediately replaced by the player's choice of a queen, knight, rook, or bishop of the same.

Block (chess)

Blockinterposingblocked
A knight check cannot be blocked but a bishop check can.
This type of blocking will only work if the attacking piece is a type that can move linearly an indefinite number of squares such as a queen, rook, or bishop and there is at least one empty square in the line between the attacking and attacked piece.

Wrong rook pawn

rook pawnWhite's bishop is of the "wrong color" from the rook pawns
For example, with just a bishop and a rook pawn, if the bishop cannot control the promotion square of the pawn, it is said to be the "wrong bishop" or the pawn is said to be the wrong rook pawn.
In chess endgames with a bishop, a pawn that is a may be the wrong rook pawn.

Fortress (chess)

fortressfortressesdefense perimeter
This results in some positions being drawn (by setting up a fortress) which otherwise would be won.
This might involve keeping the enemy king out of one's position, or a zone the enemy cannot force one out of (e.g. see the opposite-colored bishops example).

Wrong bishop

could not force
In an endgame with a bishop, in some cases the bishop is the "wrong bishop", meaning that it is on the wrong color of square for some purpose (usually promoting a pawn).
The wrong bishop is a situation in chess endgame when a bishop on the other color of square of the chessboard would either win a game instead of draw or salvage a draw from an inferior position ; in other words, a bishop is unable to guard squares of the other color.

Check (chess)

checkcheckschecking
A knight check cannot be blocked but a bishop check can.
3) Blocking the check. This only works if the checking piece is a queen, rook, or bishop and there is at least one empty square in the line between the checking piece and the checked king. Blocking a check is done by moving a piece to one such empty square. (The blocking piece is then pinned to the king by the attacking piece.)

Courier chess

The modern bishop first appeared shortly after 1200 in Courier chess.
It pioneered the modern chess bishop (called the "courier"), and probably played a part in evolving modern chess out of Medieval Chess.

Tempo (chess)

tempotempi
In certain positions a bishop can by itself lose a move (see triangulation and tempo), while a knight can never do so. The bishop is capable of skewering or pinning a piece, while the knight can do neither.
Kings, queens, bishops, and rooks can lose a tempo; a knight cannot.

Shogi

shōgiJapanese chessamateur 5-dan ranked player
The bishop was also independently invented in Japan at about the same time (the 13th century), where it formed part of sho shogi and dai shogi; it remains present in modern shogi as the direct descendant of sho shogi.
1 bishop