Bit rate

bitratedata ratedata transfer ratetransfer ratebits per secondkbit/sbpsdata ratesMbit/sbit/s
In telecommunications and computing, bit rate (bitrate or as a variable R) is the number of bits that are conveyed or processed per unit of time.wikipedia
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Data-rate units

Mbit/skbit/sGbit/s
The bit rate is quantified using the bits per second unit (symbol: "bit/s"), often in conjunction with an SI prefix such as "kilo" (1 kbit/s = 1,000 bit/s), "mega" (1 Mbit/s = 1,000 kbit/s), "giga" (1 Gbit/s = 1,000 Mbit/s) or "tera" (1 Tbit/s = 1000 Gbit/s).
In telecommunications, data-transfer rate is the average number of bits (bitrate), characters or symbols (baudrate), or data blocks per unit time passing through a communication link in a data-transmission system.

Data signaling rate

data ratesdata ratesignaling rate
In digital communication systems, the physical layer gross bitrate, raw bitrate, data signaling rate, gross data transfer rate or uncoded transmission rate (sometimes written as a variable R b or f b ) is the total number of physically transferred bits per second over a communication link, including useful data as well as protocol overhead.
In telecommunication, data signaling rate (DSR), also known as gross bit rate, is the aggregate rate at which data pass a point in the transmission path of a data transmission system.

Symbol rate

symbolbaud rateSR
The gross bit rate is related to the symbol rate or modulation rate, which is expressed in bauds or symbols per second.
The symbol rate is related to the gross bitrate expressed in bits per second.

Baud

megabaudkilobaudBaud rate
The gross bit rate is related to the symbol rate or modulation rate, which is expressed in bauds or symbols per second.
Baud is related to, but not equivalent to, gross bit rate, which can be expressed as bits per second.

Time-division multiplexing

TDMtime division multiplexingtime slot
The physical layer net bitrate, information rate, useful bit rate, payload rate, net data transfer rate, coded transmission rate, effective data rate or wire speed (informal language) of a digital communication channel is the capacity excluding the physical layer protocol overhead, for example time division multiplex (TDM) framing bits, redundant forward error correction (FEC) codes, equalizer training symbols and other channel coding.
It is used when the bit rate of the transmission medium exceeds that of the signal to be transmitted.

Communication channel

channelchannelscommunications channel
The physical layer net bitrate, information rate, useful bit rate, payload rate, net data transfer rate, coded transmission rate, effective data rate or wire speed (informal language) of a digital communication channel is the capacity excluding the physical layer protocol overhead, for example time division multiplex (TDM) framing bits, redundant forward error correction (FEC) codes, equalizer training symbols and other channel coding.
A channel has a certain capacity for transmitting information, often measured by its bandwidth in Hz or its data rate in bits per second.

Modulation

modulatedmodulatordigital modulation
For most line codes and modulation methods:
Since each tone (i.e., symbol) represents a message consisting of two digital bits in this example, the bit rate is twice the symbol rate, i.e. 2000 bits per second.

Wire speed

Networkwire-speed
The physical layer net bitrate, information rate, useful bit rate, payload rate, net data transfer rate, coded transmission rate, effective data rate or wire speed (informal language) of a digital communication channel is the capacity excluding the physical layer protocol overhead, for example time division multiplex (TDM) framing bits, redundant forward error correction (FEC) codes, equalizer training symbols and other channel coding.
In computer networking, wire speed or wirespeed refers to the hypothetical peak physical layer net bitrate (useful information rate) of a cable (consisting of fiber-optical wires or copper wires) combined with a certain digital communication device, interface, or port.

Kilobit

kbitkbkilobits
The kilobit is commonly used in the expression of data rates of digital communication circuits as kilobits per second (kbit/s or kb/s), or abbreviated as kbps, as in, for example, a 56 kbps PSTN circuit, or a 512 kbit/s broadband Internet connection.

Physical layer

physicalLayer 1PHY
In digital communication systems, the physical layer gross bitrate, raw bitrate, data signaling rate, gross data transfer rate or uncoded transmission rate (sometimes written as a variable R b or f b ) is the total number of physically transferred bits per second over a communication link, including useful data as well as protocol overhead. The physical layer net bitrate, information rate, useful bit rate, payload rate, net data transfer rate, coded transmission rate, effective data rate or wire speed (informal language) of a digital communication channel is the capacity excluding the physical layer protocol overhead, for example time division multiplex (TDM) framing bits, redundant forward error correction (FEC) codes, equalizer training symbols and other channel coding.

Phase-shift keying

QPSKBPSKPSK
Most other digital carrier-modulated schemes, for example ASK, PSK, QAM and OFDM, can be characterized as double sideband modulation, resulting in the following relation:

Code rate

rateCoding rate
The relationship between the gross bit rate and net bit rate is affected by the FEC code rate according to the following.
If R is the gross bitrate or data signalling rate (inclusive of redundant error coding), the net bitrate (the useful bit rate exclusive of error-correction codes) is.

Non-return-to-zero

NRZINRZnon-return-to-zero, inverted
In this case, the gross bit rate is equal to the symbol rate or pulse rate of 125 megabaud, due to the NRZI line code.
For a given data signaling rate, i.e., bit rate, the NRZ code requires only half the baseband bandwidth required by the Manchester code (the passband bandwidth is the same).

List of interface bit rates

List of device bandwidthsList of device bit ratesBandwidth
For more examples, see list of device bit rates, spectral efficiency comparison table and OFDM system comparison table.
Wireless devices, BPL, and modems may produce a higher line rate or gross bit rate, due to error-correcting codes and other physical layer overhead.

Throughput

maximum throughputasymptotic bandwidthBandwidth
The term throughput, essentially the same thing as digital bandwidth consumption, denotes the achieved average useful bit rate in a computer network over a logical or physical communication link or through a network node, typically measured at a reference point above the datalink layer.
As other bit rates and data bandwidths, the asymptotic throughput is measured in bits per second (bit/s), very seldom bytes per second (B/s), where 1 B/s is 8 bit/s.

Asymmetric digital subscriber line

ADSLAsymmetric DSLADSL
In ADSL, bandwidth and bit rate are said to be asymmetric, meaning greater toward the customer premises (downstream) than the reverse (upstream).

Bandwidth (computing)

bandwidthnetwork bandwidthInternet bandwidth
The term throughput, essentially the same thing as digital bandwidth consumption, denotes the achieved average useful bit rate in a computer network over a logical or physical communication link or through a network node, typically measured at a reference point above the datalink layer. Consequently, the net bit rate is sometimes called digital bandwidth capacity in bit/s.
Digital bandwidth may also refer to: multimedia bit rate or average bitrate after multimedia data compression (source coding), defined as the total amount of data divided by the playback time.

Basic Rate Interface

BRIISDN BRI2B1D
The net bit rate of ISDN2 Basic Rate Interface (2 B-channels + 1 D-channel) of 64+64+16 = 144 kbit/s also refers to the payload data rates, while the D channel signalling rate is 16 kbit/s.
In contrast to the BRI, the Primary Rate Interface (PRI) configuration provides more B channels and operates at a higher bit rate.

UMTS

WCDMAW-CDMATD-SCDMA
UMTS supports maximum theoretical data transfer rates of 42 Mbit/s when Evolved HSPA (HSPA+) is implemented in the network.

Binary prefix

gibikibitebi
Binary prefixes are sometimes used for bit rates.

Link adaptation

Adaptive modulationModulation and Coding SchemeAdaptive coding and modulation
In modems and wireless systems, link adaptation (automatic adaption of the data rate and the modulation and/or error coding scheme to the signal quality) is often applied.
Adaptive modulation systems improve rate of transmission, and/or bit error rates, by exploiting the channel state information that is present at the transmitter.

Data transmission

data transferdigital communicationsdigital communication
However, the gross bit rate and the baud value are equal only when there are only two levels per symbol, representing 0 and 1, meaning that each symbol of a data transmission system carries exactly one bit of data; for example, this is not the case for modern modulation systems used in modems and LAN equipment.
Because it requires less signal processing and less chances for error than parallel transmission, the transfer rate of each individual path may be faster.

Compression artifact

artifactscompression artifactsmosquito noise
If lossy data compression is used on audio or visual data, differences from the original signal will be introduced; if the compression is substantial, or lossy data is decompressed and recompressed, this may become noticeable in the form of compression artifacts.
Lossy data compression involves discarding some of the media's data so that it becomes small enough to be stored within the desired disk space or transmitted (streamed) within the available bandwidth (known as the data rate or bit rate).

Variable bitrate

VBRvariable bit ratevariable
The term average bitrate is used in case of variable bitrate multimedia source coding schemes.
Variable bitrate (VBR) is a term used in telecommunications and computing that relates to the bitrate used in sound or video encoding.

Video

analog videovideo albumvideo recording
In digital multimedia, bit rate refers to the number of bits used per second to represent a continuous medium such as audio or video after source coding (data compression).
It could not initially compete with analog video, due to early digital uncompressed video requiring impractically high bitrates.