Black

The Blackblack colorCoal BlackcolorRed Black a color rich in symbolismAfrican AmericanAfrican slaveAfrican-American
Black is the darkest color, the result of the absence or complete absorption of visible light.wikipedia
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White

white lightpearl whitewhitish
It is an achromatic color, literally a color without hue, like white and gray. It is often used symbolically or figuratively to represent darkness, while white represents light.
It is the color of fresh snow, chalk, and milk, and is the opposite of black.

Sable (heraldry)

sableblackcolour black
In heraldry, the word used for the black color is sable, named for the black fur of the sable, an animal.
In heraldry, sable is the tincture black, and belongs to the class of dark tinctures, called "colours".

Little black dress

black dressLBDsimple black dress
Other designers contributed to the trend of the little black dress.
Black has always been a color rich in symbolism.

Anarchist symbolism

black flaganarchy symbolanarchist symbol
The symbols of anarchism was usually either a black flag or a black letter A. More recently it is usually represented with a bisected red and black flag, to emphasise the movement's socialist roots in the First International.
The black flag and the color black in general have been associated with anarchism since the 1880s.

Gum arabic

acacia gumgumArabic Gum
The powdered charcoal was then mixed with gum arabic or the yellow of an egg to make a paint.
Phosphoric, nitric or tannic acid is added in varying concentrations to the acacia gum to etch the darker tones up to dark blacks.

Lützow Free Corps

Königlich Preußisches Freikorps von Lützow(Lützow) Uhlanen RegimentBlack Hussars
Patriotic Resistance. The Lützow Free Corps, composed of volunteer German students and academics fighting against Napoleon in 1813, could not afford to make special uniforms and therefore adopted black, as the only color that could be used to dye their civilian clothing without the original color showing.
Black was therefore used for their uniforms rather than the normal Prussian blue, because this was the only color that could be used to dye the improvised clothing (if any other had been used, the clothing's original color would have shown through, resulting in an unacceptable mix of colors for the Corps as a whole).

Black Friday (shopping)

Black Fridayday after ThanksgivingFriday following
In the United States, "Black Friday" (the day after Thanksgiving Day, the fourth Thursday in November) is traditionally the busiest shopping day of the year. Many Americans are on holiday because of Thanksgiving, and many retailers open earlier and close later than normal, and offer special prices. The day's name originated in Philadelphia sometime before 1961, and originally was used to describe the heavy and disruptive downtown pedestrian and vehicle traffic which would occur on that day. Later an alternative explanation began to be offered: that "Black Friday" indicates the point in the year that retailers begin to turn a profit, or are "in the black", because of the large volume of sales on that day.
When this was recorded in the financial records, once-common accounting practices would use red ink to show negative amounts and black ink to show positive amounts.

Rich black

Rich black, which is different from using black ink alone, in printing.
Rich black, in printing, is an ink mixture of solid black over one or more of the other CMYK colors, resulting in a darker tone than black ink alone generates in a printing process.

Mourning

official mourningmournmourning clothes
In Europe and America, black is commonly associated with mourning and bereavement, and usually worn at funerals and memorial services.
For women, the customs involved wearing heavy, concealing, black clothing, and the use of heavy veils of black crêpe.

Absorption (electromagnetic radiation)

absorptionabsorbedabsorb
Black is the darkest color, the result of the absence or complete absorption of visible light.

Visible spectrum

visiblevisible lightspectrum
Black is the darkest color, the result of the absence or complete absorption of visible light.

Hue

colorcolor huecolors
It is an achromatic color, literally a color without hue, like white and gray.

Gray's Anatomy

grayGray's ''AnatomyGray's Anatomy of the Human Body
It is an achromatic color, literally a color without hue, like white and gray.

Symbol

symbolssymbologysymbologist
It is often used symbolically or figuratively to represent darkness, while white represents light.

Dark Ages (historiography)

Dark AgesDark Agethe Dark Ages
Black and white have often been used to describe opposites; particularly truth and ignorance, good and evil, the Dark Ages versus Age of Enlightenment.

Age of Enlightenment

Enlightenmentthe Enlightenment18th-century philosophy
Black and white have often been used to describe opposites; particularly truth and ignorance, good and evil, the Dark Ages versus Age of Enlightenment.

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval period
Since the Middle Ages, black has been the symbolic color of solemnity and authority, and for this reason is still commonly worn by judges and magistrates.

Neolithic

Neolithic periodNeolithic AgeNeolithic era
Black was one of the first colors used by artists in neolithic cave paintings.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
In the Roman Empire, it became the color of mourning, and over the centuries it was frequently associated with death, evil, witches and magic.

Death

mortalitydeaddeceased
In the Roman Empire, it became the color of mourning, and over the centuries it was frequently associated with death, evil, witches and magic.

Ink

printing inkinksindelible ink
Black ink is the most common color used for printing books, newspapers and documents, as provides the highest contrast with white paper and thus the easiest color to read.

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
The word black comes from Old English blæc ("black, dark", also, "ink"), from Proto-Germanic *blakkaz ("burned"), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- ("to burn, gleam, shine, flash"), from base *bhel- ("to shine"), related to Old Saxon blak ("ink"), Old High German blach ("black"), Old Norse blakkr ("dark"), Dutch blaken ("to burn"), and Swedish bläck ("ink").

Proto-Germanic language

Proto-GermanicGermanicCommon Germanic
The word black comes from Old English blæc ("black, dark", also, "ink"), from Proto-Germanic *blakkaz ("burned"), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- ("to burn, gleam, shine, flash"), from base *bhel- ("to shine"), related to Old Saxon blak ("ink"), Old High German blach ("black"), Old Norse blakkr ("dark"), Dutch blaken ("to burn"), and Swedish bläck ("ink").

Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-EuropeanIndo-EuropeanPIE
The word black comes from Old English blæc ("black, dark", also, "ink"), from Proto-Germanic *blakkaz ("burned"), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- ("to burn, gleam, shine, flash"), from base *bhel- ("to shine"), related to Old Saxon blak ("ink"), Old High German blach ("black"), Old Norse blakkr ("dark"), Dutch blaken ("to burn"), and Swedish bläck ("ink").

Old Saxon

SaxonLow GermanSaxon language
The word black comes from Old English blæc ("black, dark", also, "ink"), from Proto-Germanic *blakkaz ("burned"), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- ("to burn, gleam, shine, flash"), from base *bhel- ("to shine"), related to Old Saxon blak ("ink"), Old High German blach ("black"), Old Norse blakkr ("dark"), Dutch blaken ("to burn"), and Swedish bläck ("ink").