Black Canadians

BlackBlack CanadianAfrican CanadianAfrican-CanadianAfricanBlacksAfro-CanadianCaribbean-CanadianAfrican originsAfrican Canadians
Black Canadians is a designation used for people of full or partial Sub-Saharan African descent, who are citizens or permanent residents of Canada.wikipedia
950 Related Articles

Black Nova Scotians

Black Nova ScotianAfrican Nova ScotianBlack
The majority of Black Canadians are of Caribbean origin, though the population also consists of African-American immigrants and their descendants (including Black Nova Scotians), as well as many native African immigrants.
Black Nova Scotians or African Nova Scotians are Black Canadians whose ancestors primarily date back to the Colonial United States as slaves or freemen, and later arrived in Nova Scotia, Canada during the 18th and early 19th centuries.

Thomas Peters (revolutionary)

Thomas PetersThomas Peters (black leader)
Promised freedom by the British during the American Revolutionary War, thousands of Black Loyalists were resettled by the Crown in Canada afterward, such as Thomas Peters.
Peters was among a group of influential Black Canadians who pressed the Crown to fulfill its commitment for land grants in Nova Scotia.

South Asian Canadians

South AsianSouth AsiansSouth Asian Canadian
Black Canadians form the third-largest visible minority group in Canada, after South Asian and Chinese Canadians.
This makes them the largest visible minority group in Canada comprising 25.6% of the visible minority population, followed by East Asian and Black Canadians respectively.

George Elliott Clarke

George Elliot ClarkeDr George Elliot ClarkeGeorge Elliot Clark
Writer George Elliott Clarke has cited a McGill University study which found that fully 43 per cent of all Black Canadians were not counted as black in the 1991 Canadian census, because they had identified on census forms as British, French or other cultural identities which were not included in the census group of Black cultures.
One of Canada's most illustrious poets, Clarke is also known for chronicling the experience and history of the Black Canadian communities of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, creating a cultural geography that he has coined "Africadia".

Jamaican Canadians

Jamaican CanadianJamaicanJamaican-Canadian
More specific national terms such as Jamaican Canadian, Haitian Canadian, or Ghanaian Canadian are also used.
Jamaican Canadians comprise about 30% of the entire Black Canadian population.

Mathieu da Costa

Mathieu de Costa
The first recorded black person to set foot on land now known as Canada was a free man named Mathieu da Costa.
He was the first recorded free black person to arrive to the land that, on 1 July 1867, would become Canada.

CKFG-FM

G98.7CKFGIntercity Broadcasting
For example, one key health organization dedicated to HIV/AIDS education and prevention in the Black Canadian community is now named the African and Caribbean Council on HIV/AIDS in Ontario, the Toronto publication Pride bills itself as an "African-Canadian and Caribbean-Canadian news magazine", and G98.7, a Black-oriented community radio station in Toronto, was initially branded as Caribbean African Radio Network.
The station is targeted to the local Black Canadian community and began broadcasting on October 3, 2011.

Lincoln Alexander

Lincoln M. AlexanderLincoln MacCauley AlexanderLincoln "Linc" Alexander
Many of the first visible minorities to hold high public offices have been Black, including Michaëlle Jean, Donald Oliver, Stanley G. Grizzle, Rosemary Brown and Lincoln Alexander, in turn opening the door for other minorities.
He ran again in the 1968 federal election and on June 25, 1968, he won the seat, becoming Canada's first black Member of Parliament.

Rosemary Brown (politician)

Rosemary BrownBROWN, Rosemary
Many of the first visible minorities to hold high public offices have been Black, including Michaëlle Jean, Donald Oliver, Stanley G. Grizzle, Rosemary Brown and Lincoln Alexander, in turn opening the door for other minorities.
She served as a Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) in the British Columbia legislature as a part of the New Democratic Party from 1972 to 1986, making her the first Black Canadian woman to be elected to a Canadian provincial legislature.

Visible minority

visible minoritiesracializedVisible minority population
Many of the first visible minorities to hold high public offices have been Black, including Michaëlle Jean, Donald Oliver, Stanley G. Grizzle, Rosemary Brown and Lincoln Alexander, in turn opening the door for other minorities.
In 2016, there were approximately 1.9 million South Asian Canadians, representing 5.6% of the country's population, followed by Chinese Canadians (4.6%) and Black Canadians (3.5%).

Underground Railroad

Underground RailwayThe Underground RailroadNational Underground Railroad Network to Freedom
In addition, an estimated ten to thirty thousand fugitive slaves reached freedom in Canada from the Southern United States during the antebellum years, aided by people along the Underground Railroad.
Numerous Black Canadian communities developed in Southern Ontario.

The Negro (film)

The NegroLe NègThe Negro (Le nèg')
Nègre ("Negro") is considered derogatory; Quebec film director Robert Morin faced controversy in 2002 when he chose the title Le Nèg' for a film about anti-Black racism, and more recently in 2015 five placenames containing Nègre (as well as six that contained the English term nigger) were changed after the Commission de toponymie du Québec ruled the terms no longer acceptable for use in geographic names.
An examination of racism, the film centres on a police officer in a small Quebec town who is trying to reconstruct, through the conflicting testimony of witnesses and participants, the events of the night before, when the petty vandalism of a woman's lawn jockey escalated within a few hours to the woman being found dead and the young Black Canadian suspected of committing the vandalism having been viciously beaten in a field.

Vancouver

Vancouver, British ColumbiaVancouver, BCVancouver, Canada
The ten most black-populated census metropolitan areas were Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary, Vancouver, Edmonton, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Halifax, and Oshawa.
The black population of Vancouver is rather scant in comparison to other Canadian major cities, making up 0.9% of the city.

Calgary

Calgary, AlbertaCalgary, ABCalgary, Alberta, Canada
The ten most black-populated census metropolitan areas were Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary, Vancouver, Edmonton, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Halifax, and Oshawa.

Winnipeg

Winnipeg, ManitobaWinnipeg, CanadaWinnipeg, MB
The ten most black-populated census metropolitan areas were Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary, Vancouver, Edmonton, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Halifax, and Oshawa.

Montreal

Montreal, QuebecMontréalMontreal, Canada
The ten most black-populated census metropolitan areas were Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary, Vancouver, Edmonton, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Halifax, and Oshawa.
The five most numerous visible minorities are Blacks (10.3%), Arabs, mainly Lebanese (7.3%), Latin Americans (4.1%), South Asians (3.3%), and Chinese (3.3%).

Stanley G. Grizzle

Stanley Grizzle
Many of the first visible minorities to hold high public offices have been Black, including Michaëlle Jean, Donald Oliver, Stanley G. Grizzle, Rosemary Brown and Lincoln Alexander, in turn opening the door for other minorities.
In 1959, Grizzle and Jack White were the first Black Canadian candidates to run for election to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (the predecessor to the New Democratic Party).

Africville

Africville, Nova Scotia
Refugees from the War of 1812, primarily from the Chesapeake Bay and Georgia Sea Islands, fled the United States to settle in Hammonds Plains, Beechville, Lucasville, North Preston, East Preston, Africville and Elm Hill, New Brunswick.
The community has become an important symbol of Black Canadian identity, as an example of the "urban renewal" trend of the 1960s that razed similarly racialized neighbourhoods across Canada, and the struggle against racism.

St. Catharines

St. Catharines, OntarioSt CatharinesSt. Catharines, ON
Militarily, a Black Loyalist named Richard Pierpoint, who was born about 1744 in Senegal and who had settled near present-day St. Catharines, Ontario, offered to organize a Corps of Men of Colour to support the British war effort.
St. Catharines remains an important place in Black Canadian history.

Elm Hill, New Brunswick

Elm Hill
Refugees from the War of 1812, primarily from the Chesapeake Bay and Georgia Sea Islands, fled the United States to settle in Hammonds Plains, Beechville, Lucasville, North Preston, East Preston, Africville and Elm Hill, New Brunswick.
It is significant as the last surviving Black Canadian community in New Brunswick.

William Hall (VC)

William HallWilliam Hall, VCWilliam Neilson Hall
In 1857, William Hall of Horton, Nova Scotia, serving as a sailor in the Royal Navy, became the first black man to win the Victoria Cross, the highest decoration for valor in the British empire, for his actions at the siege of Lucknow.
William Edward Hall (28 April 1827 – 27 August 1904) was the first Black person, first Nova Scotian, and third Canadian to receive the Victoria Cross.

Wilson Ruffin Abbott

Wilson Ruffin
In 1840, Wilson Ruffin Abbott become the first black elected to any office in what became Canada when he was elected to the city council in Toronto.
Wilson Ruffin Abbott (1801–1876) was an American-born Black Canadian and successful businessman and landowner in Toronto, Ontario.

Preston, Nova Scotia

PrestonPrestonsNorth Preston
Preston, in the Halifax area, is the community with the highest percentage of black people, with 69.4 per cent; it was a settlement where the Crown provided land to Black Loyalists after the American Revolution.
Reflecting its early history, Preston has the largest percentage of black people of any area in Canada; 69.4% of its population is black.

Daniel G. Hill

Daniel HillDaniel G HillDaniel G.
The American-born Canadian sociologist Daniel G. Hill wrote this week in June 1854 appeared to be typical of the black exodus to Canada.
Daniel Grafton Hill III, (November 23, 1923 – June 26, 2003) was a Canadian sociologist, civil servant, human rights specialist, and Black Canadian historian.

Hamilton, Ontario

HamiltonHamilton, ONCity of Hamilton
The ten most black-populated census metropolitan areas were Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary, Vancouver, Edmonton, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Halifax, and Oshawa.