Black Diaries

The Black Diaries are diaries purported to have been written by the Irish revolutionary Roger Casement, which contained accounts of homosexual liaisons with young men.wikipedia
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Roger Casement

Sir Roger Casementabuse of the indigenous tribes in the Putumayo regionAbuses against the Putumayo Indians
The Black Diaries are diaries purported to have been written by the Irish revolutionary Roger Casement, which contained accounts of homosexual liaisons with young men.
Before the trial, the British government circulated excerpts said to be from his private journals, known as the Black Diaries, which detailed homosexual activities.

Alfred Noyes

Alfred Noyes, The Highwayman.Noyes, Alfred
Another poet, Alfred Noyes, who had accepted the diaries as genuine in 1916, also criticised the establishment in a 1957 book, The Accusing Ghost or Justice for Casement.
To forestall calls for clemency, the British authorities showed public figures and known sympathizers selected pages from some of Casement's diaries – known as the Black Diaries – that exposed him as a promiscuous homosexual.

Jeff Dudgeon

Jeffrey DudgeonDudgeon, JeffreyJeffrey Edward Anthony Dudgeon
All the diaries, including for the first time the 1911 volume which contained the most prolonged sexual narrative, were published by Jeffrey Dudgeon the same year.
He has also published a study of Roger Casement's Black Diaries, which accepted them as genuine.

Homosexuality

homosexualgayhomosexuals
The Black Diaries are diaries purported to have been written by the Irish revolutionary Roger Casement, which contained accounts of homosexual liaisons with young men.

Treason

high treasontraitortraitors
Casement was charged with treason following the Easter Rising.

Easter Rising

1916 Rising1916 Easter RisingEaster Uprising
Casement was charged with treason following the Easter Rising.

F. E. Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead

Lord BirkenheadF. E. SmithF.E. Smith
During his trial the prosecution (F. E. Smith) suggested to the defence barrister (A. M. Sullivan) that they should jointly produce the diaries in evidence, as this would most likely cause the court to find Casement "guilty but insane", and save his life.

A. M. Sullivan (barrister)

A. M. SullivanSerjeant SullivanAlexander Martin Sullivan
During his trial the prosecution (F. E. Smith) suggested to the defence barrister (A. M. Sullivan) that they should jointly produce the diaries in evidence, as this would most likely cause the court to find Casement "guilty but insane", and save his life.

Trial of Lunatics Act 1883

guilty but insane
During his trial the prosecution (F. E. Smith) suggested to the defence barrister (A. M. Sullivan) that they should jointly produce the diaries in evidence, as this would most likely cause the court to find Casement "guilty but insane", and save his life.

Government of the United Kingdom

British GovernmentUK GovernmentGovernment
The British government then began to circulate photographic page copies to block any appeals or requests for clemency, particularly from the USA, that showed his "sexual degeneracy".

W. B. Yeats

William Butler YeatsW.B. YeatsYeats
The poet W. B. Yeats was moved by this book to write a poem, 'Roger Casement', which he described as "a ferocious ballad".

Official Secrets Act

Official Secrets Acts 1911 to 1989Official SecretsOfficial Secret
In 1959 Peter Singleton-Gates and Maurice Girodias published The Black Diaries—a version of the diaries which they described as being based on "a bundle of documents" given to Singleton-Gates in 1922 by "a person of some authority"—in Paris, where they could not be prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act.

Public Record Office

Keeper of Public RecordsKeeper of the Public RecordsPRO
The diaries were released by the British government the same year, when they were made available in the Public Record Office in London.

H. Montgomery Hyde

Montgomery HydeHarford Montgomery HydeHyde, H. Montgomery
In 1965 The Trial of Sir Roger Casement, a book by H. Montgomery Hyde, was banned by the Irish Censorship of Publications Board because the diary extracts in it were found to be "indecent or obscene".

Censorship of Publications Board (Ireland)

Censorship of Publications BoardCensorship BoardIrish Censorship Board
In 1965 The Trial of Sir Roger Casement, a book by H. Montgomery Hyde, was banned by the Irish Censorship of Publications Board because the diary extracts in it were found to be "indecent or obscene".

Home Office

Home AffairsHome DepartmentUK Home Office
In 1993 a Home Office expert Dr. David Baxendale made a report featured in a BBC Radio 4 documentary.

BBC Radio 4

Radio 4BBC Radio FourRadio Four
In 1993 a Home Office expert Dr. David Baxendale made a report featured in a BBC Radio 4 documentary.

Questioned document examination

forensic document examinationforensic document examinerQuestioned document examiner
At the turn of the 21st century a forensic examination of the diaries was commissioned by Bill McCormack, Professor of Literary History at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Goldsmiths, University of London

Goldsmiths CollegeGoldsmithsGoldsmith's College
At the turn of the 21st century a forensic examination of the diaries was commissioned by Bill McCormack, Professor of Literary History at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

The Guardian

GuardianManchester GuardianThe Manchester Guardian
The documents were examined by Audrey Giles, a leading forensic handwriting examiner, who concluded, according to a report in The Guardian, that "the handwriting, ink, paper, pen strokes and pencillings were all genuine."

Royal Irish Academy

MRIARIAMember of the Royal Irish Academy
The Royal Irish Academy formally published The Giles Report in 2005.

Congo Free State

CongoCongoleseHeads of state of the Congo Free State
He is a Belgian historian of the Congo Free State period, and argues closely that Casement's use of Kikongo slang, and some entries about people and places in 1903, could not have been known in London in 1916.

Kongo language

KikongoKongoKikongo language
He is a Belgian historian of the Congo Free State period, and argues closely that Casement's use of Kikongo slang, and some entries about people and places in 1903, could not have been known in London in 1916.

John Harris (anti-slavery campaigner)

John Hobbis HarrisJohn HarrisSir John Harris
Finally he quotes from the unpublished autobiography of John Harris, who was shown the diary in 1916: "''...I was so firmly convinced, that the diary was not Roger Casement's handiwork. Alas, when it was put before me and I had examined certain parts, my confidence was shaken. Then I came upon two or three facts only known in Europe to Casement and myself, and then my hopes were scattered..''".

University of Notre Dame

Notre DameNotre Dame UniversityThe University of Notre Dame
In 2016 the University of Notre Dame published Paul Hyde's monograph, which concludes that both sides of the dispute have outstanding issues to address: "... the dominant and “official” theory of the authenticity of the Black Diaries, in force for almost one hundred years, has almost no explanatory power whatsoever. It fails to answer the most basic and persistent questions" ... "Those who believe that the Black Diaries are forged do not have their belief supported by facts proven beyond reasonable doubt".