Black Nova Scotians

Black Nova ScotianAfrican Nova ScotianBlackAfrican Nova ScotiansDecline of Slavery in Nova ScotiaAfrican-Canadian550 maroonsAfrican CanadianAfrican-Nova ScotianBlack Canadians
Black Nova Scotians or African Nova Scotians are Black Canadians whose ancestors primarily date back to the Colonial United States as slaves or freemen, and later arrived in Nova Scotia, Canada during the 18th and early 19th centuries.wikipedia
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Black Canadians

BlackBlack CanadianAfrican Canadian
Black Nova Scotians or African Nova Scotians are Black Canadians whose ancestors primarily date back to the Colonial United States as slaves or freemen, and later arrived in Nova Scotia, Canada during the 18th and early 19th centuries.
The majority of Black Canadians are of Caribbean origin, though the population also consists of African-American immigrants and their descendants (including Black Nova Scotians), as well as many native African immigrants.

Viola Desmond

Viola Desmond Pardon
In the 21st century, the government and grassroots groups have initiated actions in Nova Scotia to address past harm done to Black Nova Scotians, such as the Africville Apology, the Viola Desmond Pardon, and the restorative justice initiative for the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children.
Viola Irene Desmond (July 6, 1914 – February 7, 1965) was a Canadian civil rights activist and businesswoman of Black Nova Scotian descent.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
Black Nova Scotians or African Nova Scotians are Black Canadians whose ancestors primarily date back to the Colonial United States as slaves or freemen, and later arrived in Nova Scotia, Canada during the 18th and early 19th centuries.
According to the 2006 Canadian census the largest ethnic group in Nova Scotia is Scottish (31.9%), followed by English (31.8%), Irish (21.6%), French (17.9%), German (11.3%), Aboriginal origin (5.3%), Dutch (4.1%), Black Canadians (2.8%), Welsh (1.9%) Italian (1.5%), and Scandinavian (1.4%).

Africville Apology

In the 21st century, the government and grassroots groups have initiated actions in Nova Scotia to address past harm done to Black Nova Scotians, such as the Africville Apology, the Viola Desmond Pardon, and the restorative justice initiative for the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children.
The Africville Apology was delivered on February 24, 2010 by Halifax, Nova Scotia for the eviction and eventual destruction of Africville, a Black Nova Scotian community.

Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission

in human rights
In the 20th century, Black Nova Scotians organized for civil rights, establishing such groups as the Nova Scotia Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, the Black United Front, and the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia.
Originally the mandate of the Commission was primarily to address the plight of Black Nova Scotians.

Old Burying Ground (Halifax, Nova Scotia)

Old Burying GroundOld Burial GroundOld Burying Ground, Halifax
Prior to 1799, 29 recorded Blacks were buried in the Old Burying Ground (Halifax, Nova Scotia), of which 12 of them were listed with both first and last names; seven of the graves are from the New England Planter migration (1763-1775); and 22 graves are from immediately following the arrival of the Black Loyalists in 1776.
There are also 167 recorded Blacks buried in the graveyard, all with unmarked graves.

New Horizons Baptist Church

Cornwallis Street Baptist ChurchAfrican Baptist Church
Creation of institutions such as the Royal Acadian School and the African Baptist Church in Halifax, founded in 1832, opened opportunities for Black Canadians.
Under the direction of Richard Preston, the church laid the foundation for social action to address the plight of Black Nova Scotians.

Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange

Sir Thomas Andrew Lumisden StrangeSir Thomas Strange
Similar to the judiciary in Massachusetts, two chief justices, Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange (1790–1796) and Sampson Salter Blowers (1797–1832) waged "judicial war" in their efforts to free slaves from their owners in Nova Scotia.
Sir Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange (November 30, 1756 – July 16, 1841) was a chief justice in Nova Scotia, known for waging "judicial war" to free Black Nova Scotian slaves from their owners.

Book of Negroes

The Book of Negroes3,000 former slavesa historical document of the same name
Many of these African-American settlers were recorded in the Book of Negroes.
Enslaved Africans in America who escaped to the British during the American Revolutionary War became the first settlement of Black Nova Scotians and Black Canadians.

Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia

Black Cultural CentreNova Scotia's Black Cultural CentreThe Society for the Protection and Preservation of Black Culture in Nova Scotia
In the 20th century, Black Nova Scotians organized for civil rights, establishing such groups as the Nova Scotia Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, the Black United Front, and the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia.
The centre is a museum and a library resource centre that focuses on the history and culture of African Nova Scotians.

Richard John Uniacke

Uniacke Estate
Led by Richard John Uniacke, in 1787, 1789 and again on January 11, 1808, the Nova Scotian legislature refused to legalize slavery.
He fought in the American Revolution and later sought to emancipate Catholics and Black Nova Scotians who were slaves in Nova Scotia.

Black United Front

Black United Front of Nova ScotiaBlack United Front Cairo
In the 20th century, Black Nova Scotians organized for civil rights, establishing such groups as the Nova Scotia Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, the Black United Front, and the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia.
The Black United Front did a lot to benefit the Black Nova Scotian community.

Sampson Salter Blowers

Similar to the judiciary in Massachusetts, two chief justices, Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange (1790–1796) and Sampson Salter Blowers (1797–1832) waged "judicial war" in their efforts to free slaves from their owners in Nova Scotia.
Sampson Salter Blowers (March 10, 1742 – October 25, 1842) was a noted North American lawyer, Loyalist and jurist from Nova Scotia who, along with Chief Justice Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange, waged "judicial war" in his efforts to free Black Nova Scotian slaves from their owners, leading to the decline of slavery in Nova Scotia.

Underground Railroad

Underground RailwayThe Underground RailroadNational Underground Railroad Network to Freedom
Some arrived during the war in Nova Scotia as a result of the Underground Railroad.
Another important destination was Nova Scotia, which was first settled by Black Loyalists during the American Revolution and then by Black Refugee (War of 1812) (see Black Nova Scotians).

Africville

Africville, Nova Scotia
Black Refugees from the United States settled in many parts of Nova Scotia including Hammonds Plains, Beechville, Lucasville and Africville.
Africville was founded by Black Nova Scotians from a variety of origins.

Nova Scotian Settlers

Nova Scotian settlerAfrican American foundersSettlers
They were led to Sierra Leone by John Clarkson (abolitionist) and became known as the Nova Scotian Settlers.
Their descendants today comprise the Black Nova Scotians, one of the oldest communities of Black Canadians.

Lucasville, Nova Scotia

Lucasville
Black Refugees from the United States settled in many parts of Nova Scotia including Hammonds Plains, Beechville, Lucasville and Africville.
Lucasville is a Black Nova Scotian settlement within the Halifax Regional Municipality in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.

Richard Preston (clergyman)

Richard Preston
He was the mentor of Richard Preston.
He escaped slavery in Virginia to become an important leader for the African Nova Scotian community and in the international struggle against slavery.

Birchtown, Nova Scotia

Birchtown
Blucke led the founding of Birchtown, Nova Scotia in 1783.
They formed the ancestral basis of the Black Nova Scotian population of Shelburne County today.

Black Refugee (War of 1812)

Black RefugeesBlack Refugeeescaped slaves
Black Refugees from the United States settled in many parts of Nova Scotia including Hammonds Plains, Beechville, Lucasville and Africville.
They make up the most significant single immigration source for today's African Nova Scotian communities.

Royal Acadian School

Creation of institutions such as the Royal Acadian School and the African Baptist Church in Halifax, founded in 1832, opened opportunities for Black Canadians.
Bromley had recruited many black students - children and adults - whom he taught on the weekends because they were employed during the week.

William Pearly Oliver

Reverends at the church included William A. White (1919–1936) and William Pearly Oliver (1937–1962).
William Pearly Oliver (February 11, 1912 in Wolfville, Nova Scotia – Lucasville in May 26, 1989) worked at the Cornwallis Street Baptist Church for twenty-five years (1937–1962) and was instrumental in developing the four leading organizations to support Black Nova Scotians in the 20th century: Nova Scotia Association for the Advancement of Colored People (1945), the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (1967), the Black United Front (1969) and the Black Cultural Centre (1983).

John Clarkson (abolitionist)

John ClarksonLieutenant John ClarksonLieutenant John Clarkson, RN
They were led to Sierra Leone by John Clarkson (abolitionist) and became known as the Nova Scotian Settlers.
Lieutenant Clarkson's charge was to secure among black communities of Nova Scotia, Canada, volunteers to settle in the area of the mouth of the Sierra Leone River.

Jamaican Maroons

Jamaican MaroonMaroonsMaroon
There was also the forced migration of the Jamaican Maroons in 1796, although a third of the Loyalists and nearly all of the Maroons left to found Freetown in Sierra Leone four years later.

Black Loyalist

Black LoyalistsothersAfrican descent
They were promised freedom by the Crown if they joined British lines, and some 3,000 African Americans were resettled in Nova Scotia after the war, where they were known as Black Loyalists.