Black Watch

Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)The Black WatchThe Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)Black Watch RegimentRoyal HighlandersThe Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)6th Black WatchRoyal Highland RegimentThe Black Watch, 3rd Battalion
The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland (3 SCOTS) is an infantry battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.wikipedia
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73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot

73rd Regiment of Foot73rd Foot73rd Regiment
The regiment was created as part of the Childers Reforms in 1881, when the 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot (The Black Watch) was amalgamated with the 73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot.
Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 42nd Regiment of Foot to form the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) in 1881.

Royal Regiment of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of Scotland3rd Battalion, The Black WatchGolden Highlanders
The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland (3 SCOTS) is an infantry battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. Under a plan devised by Lieutenant General Alistair Irwin and approved by General Sir Mike Jackson, on 16 December 2004, it was announced that the Black Watch was to join with five other Scottish regiments – the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders – to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, a single regiment consisting of five regular and two territorial battalions.
The status of the Black Watch was particularly controversial.

51st (Highland) Division

51st (Highland) Infantry Division51st Highland DivisionHighland Division
The 1/6th (Perthshire) Battalion and the 1/7th (Fife) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 153rd Brigade in the 51st (Highland) Division in May 1915 for service on the Western Front.
The situation was only resolved when, in January 1916, the Lancashire Brigade (by then renumbered the 154th (3rd Highland) Brigade and later became the 164th (North Lancashire) Brigade) left the division and their place was filled by original Highland battalions released by the regular divisions and by battalions of the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) not originally in the division.

1st Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

1st Division1st Infantry DivisionBritish 1st Infantry Division
The 1st Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 1st Brigade in the 1st Division in August 1914 for service on the Western Front.
42nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Highlanders, the Black Watch)

24th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

24th Guards Brigade24th Airmobile Brigade24th Brigade
The 1/5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 24th Brigade in the 8th Division for service on the Western Front.
1/5th Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) (from November 1914, left October 1915)

Highland Brigade (United Kingdom)

Highland BrigadeThe Highland Brigade Highland regiment
Part of the Scottish Division for administrative purposes from 1967, it was the senior Highland regiment.
1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

44th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

44th Brigade44th (Lowland) Infantry Brigade44th
The 9th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 44th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in July 1915 for service on the Western Front.
9th (Service) Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) (until February 1918)

1st Armoured Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

1st Guards Brigade1st (Guards) Brigade1st Armoured Infantry Brigade
The 1st Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 1st Brigade in the 1st Division in August 1914 for service on the Western Front.
1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)

Tartan

plaidclan tartantartans
This epithet may have come from the uniform plaids of dark tartan with which the companies were provided.
From 1725 the government force of the Highland Independent Companies introduced a standardised tartan chosen to avoid association with any particular clan, and this was formalised when they became the Black Watch regiment in 1739.

15th (Scottish) Infantry Division

15th (Scottish) Division15th Division15th Scottish Division
The 9th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 44th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in July 1915 for service on the Western Front.
9th (Service) Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) (left February 1918)

Battle of Magersfontein

MagersfonteinMagersfontein Battlefield MuseumMagersfotein
The battalion suffered heavy losses at the Battle of Magersfontein in December 1899.
The first column was ordered to march directly on the south-western spur of the kopje and on arrival, before dawn, the 2nd Black Watch were to move east of the kopje, where he believed the Boers had a strong-point.

Childers Reforms

reforms1881Childers
The regiment was created as part of the Childers Reforms in 1881, when the 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot (The Black Watch) was amalgamated with the 73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot.

Anglo-Egyptian War

1882 Anglo-Egyptian WarEgyptian WarEgypt 1882
The 1st Battalion saw action at the Battle of Tel el-Kebir in September 1882 during the Anglo-Egyptian War.
1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

Second Battle of the Hook

defending a positionsuccessfully held the HookThe Hook
The regiment won honours after the Second Battle of the Hook in November 1952 during the Korean War.
The advanced party of 1st Black Watch had arrived in the divisional area on 8 June and by 22 June the battalion, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel David McNeil Campbell Rose, had completed its concentration and it was arranged that training should be completed by 7 July, after which the Black Watch would join the 29th British Infantry Brigade.

Battle of Istabulat

Istabulat
It took part in the defence of Givenchy in December 1915 and then moved to Mesopotamia later that month and saw action during the siege of Kut in Spring 1916, the fall of Baghdad in March 1917 and the Battle of Istabulat in April 1917.
On 18 April, the Black Watch pushed forward a patrol along the east bank of the Dujail scouting the Ottoman position at Istabulat.

12th Armoured Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

12th Infantry Brigade12th Armoured Infantry Brigade12th Brigade
The 1st Battalion landed in France in September 1939 as part of the 12th Brigade in the 4th Infantry Division for service with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF).
1st Battalion, Black Watch (until March 1940)

26th Division (United Kingdom)

26th Division26th26th British Division
The 10th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 77th Brigade in the 26th Division in September 1915 for service on the Western Front.
10th (Service) Battalion, Black Watch (left 30 June 1918)

Royal Scots

1st Regiment of Foot1st Foot1st Royals
Under a plan devised by Lieutenant General Alistair Irwin and approved by General Sir Mike Jackson, on 16 December 2004, it was announced that the Black Watch was to join with five other Scottish regiments – the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders – to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, a single regiment consisting of five regular and two territorial battalions.
The regiment existed continuously until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, which merged with the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch, the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Scottish, Welsh and Irish Division

It has been part of the Scottish, Welsh and Irish Division for administrative purposes from 2017.
The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland (Light infantry)

Clan Campbell

CampbellCampbellsCampbell family
In 1725, following the Jacobite rebellion of 1715, General George Wade was authorised by George I to form six "watch" companies to patrol the Highlands of Scotland, three from Clan Campbell, one from Clan Fraser of Lovat, one from Clan Munro and one from Clan Grant.
Campbell: More commonly known as the Black Watch tartan or the Government Sett. The Black Watch, first raised in 1695 to police the 'Black Trade' of cattle smuggling in the Highlands, taking role later as a militia in 1725 by General Wade (after the act of Union in 1707), become what was the first Highland Regiment in the British Army. All Campbell tartans are based upon the Black Watch tartan, as are many clan tartans. The tartan was used, and is in current use, by several military units throughout the Commonwealth.

King's Own Scottish Borderers

25th Regiment of Foot25th Foot25th
Under a plan devised by Lieutenant General Alistair Irwin and approved by General Sir Mike Jackson, on 16 December 2004, it was announced that the Black Watch was to join with five other Scottish regiments – the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders – to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, a single regiment consisting of five regular and two territorial battalions.
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment.

Second Battle of Fallujah

Battle of FallujahOperation Phantom FuryFallujah
In October, the Black Watch was at the centre of political controversy after the United States Army requested British forces to be moved further north, outside of the British-controlled Multi-National Division (South East), to replace forces temporarily redeployed for the Second Battle of Fallujah.
The 850-strong 1st Battalion of the Black Watch was ordered to help U.S. and Iraqi forces with the encirclement of Fallujah.

7th (Meerut) Division

21st (Bareilly) Brigade19th (Dehra Dun) Brigade7th (Meerut)
The 2nd Battalion landed at Marseille as part of the Bareilly Brigade in the 7th (Meerut) Division in October 1914 for service on the Western Front.
2nd Bn. Black Watch

8th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

8th Division8th Infantry Division8th
The 1/5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 24th Brigade in the 8th Division for service on the Western Front.
1/5th Battalion, the Black Watch (until October 1915)

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders)1st Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highland Regiment93rd Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
Under a plan devised by Lieutenant General Alistair Irwin and approved by General Sir Mike Jackson, on 16 December 2004, it was announced that the Black Watch was to join with five other Scottish regiments – the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders – to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, a single regiment consisting of five regular and two territorial battalions.
As part of the restructuring of the British Army's infantry in 2006, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders were amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) and the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) into the seven battalion strong Royal Regiment of Scotland.