Blinding (punishment)

blindedblindingblindact of vengeance and tortureeyes burned outhis sightlost their sight
Blinding is a type of physical punishment which results in complete or nearly complete loss of vision.wikipedia
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Visual impairment

blindblindnessvisually impaired
Blinding is a type of physical punishment which results in complete or nearly complete loss of vision.
Blinding has been used as an act of vengeance and torture in some instances, to deprive a person of a major sense by which they can navigate or interact within the world, act fully independently, and be aware of events surrounding them.

Corporal punishment

physical punishmentcorporalbeaten
Blinding is a type of physical punishment which results in complete or nearly complete loss of vision.
In Medieval Europe, the Byzantine Empire blinded and denosed some criminals and rival emperors.

Royal forest

forest lawroyal hunting forestforest
King William was also accused of making the killing of a hart or hind in a royal forest into a crime punishable by blinding, but the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle claims that this was made up to tarnish the King's reputation.
The accusation that he "laid a law upon it, that whoever slew hart or hind should be blinded," according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is little more than propaganda.

Revenge

vengeanceretaliationretribution
It has been used as an act of revenge and torture.

Torture

Classical antiquity

antiquityclassicalancient
The punishment has been used since Antiquity; Greek mythology makes several references to blinding as divine punishment, which reflects human practice.

Greek mythology

GreekGreek mythmythological
The punishment has been used since Antiquity; Greek mythology makes several references to blinding as divine punishment, which reflects human practice.

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineEastern Roman EmpireByzantines
In the Byzantine Empire and many other historical societies, blinding was accomplished by gouging out the eyes, sometimes using a hot poker, and by pouring a boiling substance, such as vinegar, on them. Byzantine general Belisarius (c.

Eye-gouging

Eye gougingeye gougeeye-gouge
In the Byzantine Empire and many other historical societies, blinding was accomplished by gouging out the eyes, sometimes using a hot poker, and by pouring a boiling substance, such as vinegar, on them.

Oedipus

OedipalŒdipusOedipe
Oedipus gouged out his own eyes after accidentally fulfilling the prophecy that he would end up killing his father and marrying his mother.

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
In the Bible, Samson was blinded upon his capture by the Philistines.

Samson

SampsonShimshonSamson and Delilah
In the Bible, Samson was blinded upon his capture by the Philistines.

Philistines

PhilistinePhilistiaPeleset
In the Bible, Samson was blinded upon his capture by the Philistines.

Early Christianity

early Christianearly Churchearly Christians
Early Christians were often blinded as a penalty for their beliefs.

Saint Lucy

St. LucyLucyLucy of Syracuse
For example, St. Lucy's torturers tore out her eyes.

Treason

high treasontraitortraitors
In the Middle Ages, blinding was used as a penalty for treason or as a means of rendering a political opponent unable to rule and lead an army in war.

Belisarius

Flavius BelisariusGeneral BelisariusBelisarius invades Africa
Byzantine general Belisarius (c.

Justinian I

JustinianEmperor JustinianJustinian the Great
500 - 565) is said to have been blinded at the order of the Emperor Justinian.

Vazul

contradictory information of his parentagetwo contradictory reports
Vazul (before 997 – 1031/1032) of the Hungarian royal House of Árpád was blinded at the order either of his cousin King Stephen I or of his queen, Gisela.

Árpád dynasty

ÁrpádHouse of ÁrpádÁrpáds
Vazul (before 997 – 1031/1032) of the Hungarian royal House of Árpád was blinded at the order either of his cousin King Stephen I or of his queen, Gisela.

Stephen I of Hungary

Stephen ISaint StephenStephen
Vazul (before 997 – 1031/1032) of the Hungarian royal House of Árpád was blinded at the order either of his cousin King Stephen I or of his queen, Gisela.

Gisela of Hungary

GiselaGiselle of BavariaGisela of Bavaria
Vazul (before 997 – 1031/1032) of the Hungarian royal House of Árpád was blinded at the order either of his cousin King Stephen I or of his queen, Gisela.

Battle of Kleidion

Kleidion, Battle ofBattle of BelasitsaBattle of Kleidon
After the Battle of Kleidion of 1014, the Byzantine Emperor Basil II had captured several thousand soldiers from the Bulgarian Empire.

List of Byzantine emperors

Byzantine EmperorEmperorByzantine emperors
After the Battle of Kleidion of 1014, the Byzantine Emperor Basil II had captured several thousand soldiers from the Bulgarian Empire.