Blood

human bloodhematologicalblood-formingoxygenated bloodoxygen consumptionoxygen transportblood compositionoxygen deliveryblood oxygen capacityhemic
Blood is a body fluid in humans and other animals that delivers necessary substances such as nutrients and oxygen to the cells and transports metabolic waste products away from those same cells.wikipedia
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Hemoglobin

haemoglobinoxyhemoglobindeoxyhemoglobin
These contain hemoglobin, an iron-containing protein, which facilitates oxygen transport by reversibly binding to this respiratory gas and greatly increasing its solubility in blood. 4.7 to 6.1 million (male), 4.2 to 5.4 million (female) erythrocytes: Red blood cells contain the blood's hemoglobin and distribute oxygen. Mature red blood cells lack a nucleus and organelles in mammals. The red blood cells (together with endothelial vessel cells and other cells) are also marked by glycoproteins that define the different blood types. The proportion of blood occupied by red blood cells is referred to as the hematocrit, and is normally about 45%. The combined surface area of all red blood cells of the human body would be roughly 2,000 times as great as the body's exterior surface.
Haemoglobin in the blood carries oxygen from the lungs or gills to the rest of the body (i.e. the tissues).

Circulatory system

cardiovascularcirculationcardiovascular system
Insects and some mollusks use a fluid called hemolymph instead of blood, the difference being that hemolymph is not contained in a closed circulatory system.
The circulatory system, also called the cardiovascular system or the vascular system, is an organ system that permits blood to circulate and transport nutrients (such as amino acids and electrolytes), oxygen, carbon dioxide, hormones, and blood cells to and from the cells in the body to provide nourishment and help in fighting diseases, stabilize temperature and pH, and maintain homeostasis.

Hemolymph

haemolymphcirculatory system
Insects and some mollusks use a fluid called hemolymph instead of blood, the difference being that hemolymph is not contained in a closed circulatory system.
Hemolymph, or haemolymph, is a fluid, analogous to the blood in vertebrates, that circulates in the interior of the arthropod body remaining in direct contact with the animal's tissues.

Coagulation

blood clottingblood coagulationclotting
Platelets are important in the clotting of blood.
Coagulation, also known as clotting, is the process by which blood changes from a liquid to a gel, forming a blood clot.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
Blood is circulated around the body through blood vessels by the pumping action of the heart.
The heart is a muscular organ in most animals, which pumps blood through the blood vessels of the circulatory system.

Artery

arteriesarterialarterial system
In animals with lungs, arterial blood carries oxygen from inhaled air to the tissues of the body, and venous blood carries carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism produced by cells, from the tissues to the lungs to be exhaled. In humans, blood is pumped from the strong left ventricle of the heart through arteries to peripheral tissues and returns to the right atrium of the heart through veins.
An artery (plural arteries) is a blood vessel that takes blood away from the heart to all parts of the body (tissues, lungs, etc).

Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
In animals with lungs, arterial blood carries oxygen from inhaled air to the tissues of the body, and venous blood carries carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism produced by cells, from the tissues to the lungs to be exhaled. In humans, blood is pumped from the strong left ventricle of the heart through arteries to peripheral tissues and returns to the right atrium of the heart through veins.
Veins are blood vessels that carry blood toward the heart.

Blood vessel

vascularblood vesselsintravascular
Blood is circulated around the body through blood vessels by the pumping action of the heart.
The blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system, and microcirculation, that transports blood throughout the human body.

Blood cell

blood cellshematopoietic cellhemocyte
In vertebrates, it is composed of blood cells suspended in blood plasma. Arthropods, using hemolymph, have hemocytes as part of their immune system.
A blood cell, also called a hematopoietic cell, hemocyte, or hematocyte, is a cell produced through hematopoiesis and found mainly in the blood.

Arthropod

arthropodsarthropodabug
Arthropods, using hemolymph, have hemocytes as part of their immune system.
Arthropods' primary internal cavity is a haemocoel, which accommodates their internal organs, and through which their haemolymph – analogue of blood – circulates; they have open circulatory systems.

Blood lipids

blood cholesterolblood lipidserum
Supply of nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids (dissolved in the blood or bound to plasma proteins (e.g., blood lipids))
Blood lipids (or blood fats) are lipids in the blood, either free or bound to other molecules.

Hemorheology

blood viscosityBlood Rheologyblood viscosity ("thickness" of the blood)
Whole blood (plasma and cells) exhibits non-Newtonian fluid dynamics.
Hemorheology, also spelled haemorheology (from the Greek ‘αἷμα, haima "blood" and rheology [from Greek ῥέω rhéō, "flow" and -λoγία, -logia, "study of"]), or blood rheology, is the study of flow properties of blood and its elements of plasma and cells.

Blood volume

volumevolume of bloodblood volume determination
Blood accounts for 7% of the human body weight, with an average density around 1060 kg/m 3, very close to pure water's density of 1000 kg/m 3 . The average adult has a blood volume of roughly 5 L, which is composed of plasma and several kinds of cells.
Blood volume is the volume of blood (both red blood cells and plasma) in the circulatory system of any individual.

Antibody

antibodiesimmunoglobulinimmunoglobulins
Immunological functions, including circulation of white blood cells, and detection of foreign material by antibodies
Soluble antibodies are released into the blood and tissue fluids, as well as many secretions to continue to survey for invading microorganisms.

Hematocrit

haematocrithemoconcentrationpacked cell volume
4.7 to 6.1 million (male), 4.2 to 5.4 million (female) erythrocytes: Red blood cells contain the blood's hemoglobin and distribute oxygen. Mature red blood cells lack a nucleus and organelles in mammals. The red blood cells (together with endothelial vessel cells and other cells) are also marked by glycoproteins that define the different blood types. The proportion of blood occupied by red blood cells is referred to as the hematocrit, and is normally about 45%. The combined surface area of all red blood cells of the human body would be roughly 2,000 times as great as the body's exterior surface.
The hematocrit (Ht or HCT), also known by several other names, is the volume percentage (vol%) of red blood cells in blood.

Body fluid

bodily fluidbodily fluidsbody fluids
Blood is a body fluid in humans and other animals that delivers necessary substances such as nutrients and oxygen to the cells and transports metabolic waste products away from those same cells.
Clinical samples are generally defined as non-infectious human or animal materials including blood, saliva, excreta, body tissue and tissue fluids, and also FDA-approved pharmaceuticals that are blood products.

White blood cell

leukocyteleukocyteswhite blood cells
Immunological functions, including circulation of white blood cells, and detection of foreign material by antibodies The blood cells are mainly red blood cells (also called RBCs or erythrocytes), white blood cells (also called WBCs or leukocytes) and platelets (also called thrombocytes).
Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system.

Endothelium

endothelialendothelial cellsendothelial cell
4.7 to 6.1 million (male), 4.2 to 5.4 million (female) erythrocytes: Red blood cells contain the blood's hemoglobin and distribute oxygen. Mature red blood cells lack a nucleus and organelles in mammals. The red blood cells (together with endothelial vessel cells and other cells) are also marked by glycoproteins that define the different blood types. The proportion of blood occupied by red blood cells is referred to as the hematocrit, and is normally about 45%. The combined surface area of all red blood cells of the human body would be roughly 2,000 times as great as the body's exterior surface.
Endothelium refers to cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels, forming an interface between circulating blood or lymph in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall.

Non-Newtonian fluid

non-Newtoniannon-Newtonian flowoobleck
Whole blood (plasma and cells) exhibits non-Newtonian fluid dynamics.
Many salt solutions and molten polymers are non-Newtonian fluids, as are many commonly found substances such as custard, honey, toothpaste, starch suspensions, maizena, paint, blood, and shampoo.

Lactic acid

lactatelacticblood lactate
Removal of waste such as carbon dioxide, urea, and lactic acid
The concentration of blood lactate is usually 1–2 mM at rest, but can rise to over 20 mM during intense exertion and as high as 25 mM afterward.

Serum albumin

albuminplasma albuminALB
Serum albumin
Serum albumin, often referred to simply as blood albumin, is an albumin (a type of globular protein) found in vertebrate blood.

Immune system

immuneimmune responseimmune responses
Arthropods, using hemolymph, have hemocytes as part of their immune system.
The symptoms of inflammation are redness, swelling, heat, and pain, which are caused by increased blood flow into tissue.

Ventricle (heart)

ventricleleft ventricleright ventricle
In humans, blood is pumped from the strong left ventricle of the heart through arteries to peripheral tissues and returns to the right atrium of the heart through veins.
A ventricle is one of two large chambers toward the bottom of the heart that collect and expel blood received from an atrium towards the peripheral beds within the body and lungs.

Urinary system

urinary tracturinaryrenal system
Blood pH, partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO 2 ), and bicarbonate (HCO 3 − ) are carefully regulated by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, which exert their influence principally through the respiratory system and the urinary system to control the acid-base balance and respiration.
Urine is formed in the kidneys through a filtration of blood.

Haematopoiesis

hematopoietichematopoiesishaematopoietic
In vertebrates, the various cells of blood are made in the bone marrow in a process called hematopoiesis, which includes erythropoiesis, the production of red blood cells; and myelopoiesis, the production of white blood cells and platelets.
Haematopoiesis (from Greek αἷμα, "blood" and ποιεῖν "to make"; also hematopoiesis in American English; sometimes also haemopoiesis or hemopoiesis) is the formation of blood cellular components.