A healthcare worker measuring blood pressure using a sphygmomanometer.
Modern stethoscope
A digital sphygmomanometer used for measuring blood pressure
A girl having her heart listened to with a stethoscope.
Overview of main complications of persistent high blood pressure
This early stethoscope belonged to Laennec. (Science Museum, London)
Cardiac systole and diastole
Early stethoscopes
Blood flow velocity waveforms in the central retinal artery (red) and vein (blue), measured by laser Doppler imaging in the eye fundus of a healthy volunteer.
A Traube-type stethoscope in ivory
Schematic of pressures in the circulation
Early flexible tube stethoscopes. Golding Bird's instrument is on the left. The instrument on the right is the stethophone.
A schematic representation of the arterial pressure waveform over one cardiac cycle. The notch in the curve is associated with closing of the aortic valve.
A doctor using a stethoscope to listen to a patient's abdomen
Taking blood pressure with a sphygmomanometer
Parts of a binaural stethoscope
Acoustic stethoscope, with the bell upwards
A Pinard horn used by a U.S. Army Reserve nurse in Uganda
A 3D-printed stethoscope

In combination with a manual sphygmomanometer, it is commonly used when measuring blood pressure.

- Stethoscope

Traditionally, a health-care worker measured blood pressure non-invasively by auscultation (listening) through a stethoscope for sounds in one arm's artery as the artery is squeezed, closer to the heart, by an aneroid gauge or a mercury-tube sphygmomanometer.

- Blood pressure
A healthcare worker measuring blood pressure using a sphygmomanometer.

1 related topic

Alpha

Medical student taking blood pressure at the brachial artery

Sphygmomanometer

Medical student taking blood pressure at the brachial artery
Explanation of how blood pressure is measured based on Korotkow sounds
A French sphygmomanometer used during World War I

A sphygmomanometer, a blood pressure monitor, or blood pressure gauge, is a device used to measure blood pressure, composed of an inflatable cuff to collapse and then release the artery under the cuff in a controlled manner, and a mercury or aneroid manometer to measure the pressure.

Manual sphygmomanometers are used with a stethoscope when using the auscultatory technique.