Blue carbon

Blue carbon sequestration
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae.wikipedia
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Ocean

marineoceansmaritime
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae.

Salt marsh

saltmarshsalt marshessalt-marsh
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae.

Seagrass

sea grassseagrass meadowseagrasses
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae. Seagrass are a group of about 60 angiosperm species that have adapted to an aquatic life, and can grow in meadows along the shores of all continents except Antarctica.

Ecosystem services

ecosystem serviceenvironmental servicesecological services
These seagrass meadows are highly productive habitats that provide many ecosystem services, including sediment stabilization, habitat and biodiversity, better water quality, and carbon and nutrient sequestration.

Carbon sequestration

sequestrationsequesteredsequester
Seagrasses, mangroves and salt marshes can capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by sequestering the C in their underlying sediments, in underground and below-ground biomass, and in dead biomass. Mangroves are woody halophytes that form intertidal forests and provide many important ecosystem services including coastal protection, nursery grounds for coastal fish and crustaceans, forest products, recreation, nutrient filtration and carbon sequestration.

Mangrove

mangrovesmangrove forestmangrove swamps
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae. Mangroves are woody halophytes that form intertidal forests and provide many important ecosystem services including coastal protection, nursery grounds for coastal fish and crustaceans, forest products, recreation, nutrient filtration and carbon sequestration.
Mangroves are an important source of blue carbon.

Carbon

Ccarbonaceouscarbon atom
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae. Historically the ocean and terrestrial forest ecosystems have been the major natural carbon (C) sinks.

Ecosystem

ecosystemsenvironmenteco-system
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae.

Seaweed

macroalgaeseaweedssea weed
Blue carbon is the carbon captured by the world's coastal ocean ecosystems, mostly mangroves, salt marshes, seagrasses and potentially macroalgae.

Forest ecology

forest ecosystemforest ecosystemsforest habitat
Historically the ocean and terrestrial forest ecosystems have been the major natural carbon (C) sinks.

Seabed

sea floorocean floorseafloor
Although the ocean's vegetated habitats cover less than 0.5% of the seabed, they are responsible for more than 50%, and potentially up to 70%, of all carbon storage in ocean sediments.

Carbon sink

carbon dioxide sinksinkssink
Despite their small footprint, they can store a comparable amount of carbon per year and are highly efficient carbon sinks.

Carbon dioxide

CO 2 CO2carbon dioxide (CO 2 )
Seagrasses, mangroves and salt marshes can capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by sequestering the C in their underlying sediments, in underground and below-ground biomass, and in dead biomass.

Terrestrial plant

terrestrialterrestriallyterrestrials
Although vegetated coastal ecosystems cover less area and have less aboveground biomass than terrestrial plants they have the potential to impact longterm C sequestration, particularly in sediment sinks.

Flowering plant

Angiospermsflowering plantsangiosperm
Seagrass are a group of about 60 angiosperm species that have adapted to an aquatic life, and can grow in meadows along the shores of all continents except Antarctica.

Antarctica

AntarcticAntarctic continentReference Elevation Model of Antarctica
Seagrass are a group of about 60 angiosperm species that have adapted to an aquatic life, and can grow in meadows along the shores of all continents except Antarctica.

Water quality

qualitywaterchemical hydrology
Seagrass meadows form in maximum depths of up to 50m, depending on water quality and light availability, and can include up to 12 different species in one meadow.

Biodiversity

diversitybiological diversitybiodiverse
These seagrass meadows are highly productive habitats that provide many ecosystem services, including sediment stabilization, habitat and biodiversity, better water quality, and carbon and nutrient sequestration.

Pelagic sediment

marine sedimentmarine sedimentspelagic sediments
Carbon primarily accumulates in marine sediments, which are anoxic and thus continually preserve organic carbon from decadal-millennial time scales.

Anoxic waters

anoxicanoxiaanoxic conditions
Carbon primarily accumulates in marine sediments, which are anoxic and thus continually preserve organic carbon from decadal-millennial time scales.

Electrical resistivity and conductivity

electrical conductivityresistivityconductivity
High accumulation rates, low oxygen, low sediment conductivity and slower microbial decomposition rates all encourage carbon burial and carbon accumulation in these coastal sediments.

Decomposition

decomposedecaydecomposing
High accumulation rates, low oxygen, low sediment conductivity and slower microbial decomposition rates all encourage carbon burial and carbon accumulation in these coastal sediments.

Eutrophication

eutrophiceutrophicatedeutrophied
Seagrass habitats are threatened by coastal eutrophication, increased seawater temperatures, increased sedimentation and coastal development, and sea-level rise which may decrease light availability for photosynthesis.

Photosynthesis

photosyntheticphotosynthesizephotosynthesizing
Seagrass habitats are threatened by coastal eutrophication, increased seawater temperatures, increased sedimentation and coastal development, and sea-level rise which may decrease light availability for photosynthesis.

Halophyte

halophytichalophytessalt-tolerant
Mangroves are woody halophytes that form intertidal forests and provide many important ecosystem services including coastal protection, nursery grounds for coastal fish and crustaceans, forest products, recreation, nutrient filtration and carbon sequestration.