Blue whale

blueblue whalesBalaenoptera musculusNorthern blue whalesouthern blueSouthern blue whaleBalaenoptera musculus intermediaBalaenoptera musculus musculusBalaeonoptera musculusBlue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the baleen whale parvorder, Mysticeti.wikipedia
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Largest organisms

largestlargest living organismlargest organism
At up to 29.9 m in length and with a maximum recorded weight of 173 tonne, it is the largest animal known to have ever existed.
The blue whale is believed to be the largest animal to have ever lived.

Baleen whale

Mysticetibaleen whalesmysticete
The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the baleen whale parvorder, Mysticeti.
Baleen whales range in size from the 6 m and 3000 kg pygmy right whale to the 31 m and 190 MT blue whale, the largest known animal to have ever existed.

Fin whale

finBalaenoptera physalusfin whales
Blue whales are rorquals (family Balaenopteridae), a family that includes the humpback whale, the fin whale, Bryde's whale, the sei whale, and the minke whale.
It is the second-largest species on Earth after the blue whale.

Pygmy blue whale

pygmy bluePygmy blues
m. brevicauda'' (also known as the pygmy blue whale) found in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean.
The pygmy blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) is a subspecies of the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) found in the Indian Ocean and the southern Pacific Ocean.

Sei whale

seiBalaenoptera borealisNorthern sei whale
Blue whales are rorquals (family Balaenopteridae), a family that includes the humpback whale, the fin whale, Bryde's whale, the sei whale, and the minke whale.
The sei whale ( or ) (Balaenoptera borealis) is a baleen whale, the third-largest rorqual after the blue whale and the fin whale.

Krill

euphausiidEuphausiaceaEuphausiidae
As with other baleen whales, its diet consists almost exclusively of small crustaceans known as krill.
Krill are also the main prey of baleen whales, including the blue whale.

Humpback whale

MegapteraMegapterinaehumpback whales
Blue whales are rorquals (family Balaenopteridae), a family that includes the humpback whale, the fin whale, Bryde's whale, the sei whale, and the minke whale.
Humpback whales are rorquals, members of the Balaenopteridae family that includes the blue, fin, Bryde's, sei and minke whales.

Rorqual

BalaenopteridaeBalaenopterinaebalaenopterid
Blue whales are rorquals (family Balaenopteridae), a family that includes the humpback whale, the fin whale, Bryde's whale, the sei whale, and the minke whale.
They include what is believed to be the largest animal that has ever lived, the blue whale, which can reach 180 t, and the fin whale, which reaches 120 t; even the smallest of the group, the northern minke whale, reaches 9 t.

Minke whale

minkeminke whalesAntarctic minke whales
Blue whales are rorquals (family Balaenopteridae), a family that includes the humpback whale, the fin whale, Bryde's whale, the sei whale, and the minke whale.
The name is a partial translation of Norwegian minkehval, possibly after a Norwegian whaler named Meincke, who mistook a northern minke whale for a blue whale.

Bryde's whale

Eden's whaleBalaenoptera edeniBryde
Blue whales are rorquals (family Balaenopteridae), a family that includes the humpback whale, the fin whale, Bryde's whale, the sei whale, and the minke whale.
The Bryde's whale is a baleen whale, more specifically a rorqual belonging to the same group as blue whales and humpback whales.

Largest body part

largestlongestLargest body parts
The heart of an average sized blue whale weighs 400 lb and is the largest known in any animal.

Blue whale penis

largest penis of any organismThe blue whale's penis
The blue whale penis is the largest penis of any living organism and also set the Guinness World Record as the longest of any animal's.
The blue whale has the largest penis in the animal kingdom.

Marine mammal

marine mammalssea mammalssea mammal
The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the baleen whale parvorder, Mysticeti.
Today, populations of species that were historically hunted, such as blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) and the North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica), are much lower than their pre-whaling levels.

Cetology of Moby-Dick

Moby-Dickcetology
Herman Melville called this species "sulphur-bottom" in his novel Moby-Dick (1851) due to an orange-brown or yellow tinge on the underparts from diatom films on the skin.
In the case of some species, in particular the blue whale (which Ishmael calls the "sulphur-bottom whale"), very little was known at the time.

Southern Ocean

Antarctic OceanSouthernSouth Seas
m. intermedia of the Southern Ocean and B.
Antarctic sea life includes penguins, blue whales, orcas, colossal squids and fur seals.

Right whale

Eubalaenaright whalesright
Their speed and power meant that they were rarely pursued by early whalers, who instead targeted sperm and right whales.
In fact, right whales rank only behind the blue whale in sheer body mass. One (apocryphal) explanation for their name is that whalers identified them as the "right" whale to kill on a hunt due to the plentiful oil and baleen they could provide.

Antarctica

AntarcticAntarctic continentReference Elevation Model of Antarctica
There is some uncertainty about the biggest blue whale ever found, as most data came from blue whales killed in Antarctic waters during the first half of the twentieth century, which were collected by whalers not well-versed in standard zoological measurement techniques.
Antarctic sea life includes penguins, blue whales, orcas, colossal squids and fur seals.

Bragar

Bragar, Na h-Eileanan Siar
In 1920, a blue whale washed up near Bragar on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.
The village's best-known landmark is a whalebone arch, made in 1921 from the jawbone of an 80 ft long blue whale which was beached on the shore the year before.

Killer whale

orcakiller whalesorcas
The whales' only natural predator is the orca.
Groups even attack larger cetaceans such as minke whales, grey whales, and, rarely, sperm whales or blue whales.

Sea of Japan

Japan SeaEast SeaJapan
There were also small, but constant catch records around the Korean Peninsula and in the coastal waters of the Sea of Japan; this species is normally considered not to frequent into marginal seas, such as the Sea of Okhotsk, on usual migrations.
They also made attempts to catch blue and fin whales, but these species invariably sank after being killed.

Robert Sibbald

Sir Robert SibbaldDr (later Sir) Robert SibbaldSibbald
The first published description of the blue whale comes from Robert Sibbald's Phalainologia Nova (1694).
Originally the blue whale was named after Sibbald, who first described it scientifically.

Hainan

Hainan IslandHainan ProvinceHainan, China
Historically, wintering grounds existed off the Hawaiian Archipelago, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Bonin Islands and Ryukyu Islands, the Philippines, Taiwan, the Zhoushan Archipelago, and the South China Sea such as in Daya Bay, off the Leizhou Peninsula, and off Hainan Island, and further south to the Paracel Islands.
Many whales such as North Pacific right whales, western gray whales, humpback whales, and blue whales (all of these are almost extinct in Chinese waters) were historically seen in the winter and spring to mate and calve.

Marine mammals and sonar

sonaracoustic pollutionactive sonar
The ever-increasing amount of ocean noise, including sonar, drowns out the vocalizations produced by whales, which makes it harder for them to communicate.
Research has recently shown that beaked and blue whales are sensitive to mid-frequency active sonar and move rapidly away from the source of the sonar, a response that disrupts their feeding and can cause mass strandings.

Whaling in the Soviet Union and Russia

illegal whaling by the Soviet Union
Blue whale hunting was banned in 1966 by the International Whaling Commission, and illegal whaling by the Soviet Union finally halted in the 1970s, by which time 330,000 blue whales had been caught in the Antarctic, 33,000 in the rest of the Southern Hemisphere, 8,200 in the North Pacific, and 7,000 in the North Atlantic.
During this time, catches rose significantly from 384 in the 1946–47 season to almost 3000 in the 1951–52 season, and during this time falsification of catches began in earnest: in the 1951–52 season, the fleet killed 950 humpback whales and reported only 8; many blue and southern right whales were killed during this time as well and went unreported.

Porcupine Seabight

Porcupine Basin
Off Ireland, the first confirmed sightings were made in 2008, since then Porcupine Seabight has been regarded as a prominent habitat for the species along with fin whales.
This includes many fin whales and blue whales, the first confirmed sighting of the latter in Irish waters being made here as recently as 2008.