Blues

blues musicthe bluespiano bluesEast Coast bluesurban bluesbluesyjuke joint bluesblues pianocontemporary bluesbluesman
Blues is a music genre and musical form which was originated in the Deep South of the United States around the 1870s by African-Americans from roots in African musical traditions, African-American work songs, and spirituals.wikipedia
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Jazz

jazz musicContemporary jazzModern Jazz
The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.
It originated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.

Bassline

bassbass linewalking bass
Blues shuffles or walking bass reinforce the trance-like rhythm and form a repetitive effect known as the groove.
A bassline (also known as a bass line or bass part) is the term used in many styles of music, such as jazz, blues, funk, dub and electronic, traditional music, or classical music for the low-pitched instrumental part or line played (in jazz and some forms of popular music) by a rhythm section instrument such as the electric bass, double bass, cello, tuba or keyboard (piano, Hammond organ, electric organ, or synthesizer).

List of blues genres

subgenres
Blues subgenres include country blues, such as Delta blues and Piedmont blues, as well as urban blues styles such as Chicago blues and West Coast blues.
Blues can be categorized into a number of genres.

Blues scale

bluesblues-scale6-Z47
The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.
The term blues scale refers to several different scales with differing numbers of pitches and related characteristics.

Delta blues

DeltabluesMississippi blues
Blues subgenres include country blues, such as Delta blues and Piedmont blues, as well as urban blues styles such as Chicago blues and West Coast blues.
Delta blues is one of the earliest-known styles of blues.

Chord progression

progressionchord progressionschord changes
The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.
Chord progressions are the foundation of Western popular music styles (e.g., pop music, rock music) and traditional music (e.g., blues and jazz).

Electric blues

electricChicago electric blueselectric-based R&B
World War II marked the transition from acoustic to electric blues and the progressive opening of blues music to a wider audience, especially white listeners.
Electric blues refers to any type of blues music distinguished by the use of electric amplification for musical instruments.

Chicago blues

ChicagoChicago-style bluesblues
Blues subgenres include country blues, such as Delta blues and Piedmont blues, as well as urban blues styles such as Chicago blues and West Coast blues.
The Chicago blues is a form of blues music indigenous to Chicago, Illinois.

Rock music

rockrock bandrock musician
In the 1960s and 1970s, a hybrid form called blues rock developed, which blended blues styles with rock music.
It has its roots in 1940s and 1950s rock and roll, a style which drew heavily from the genres of blues, rhythm and blues, and from country music.

Blues rock

blues-rockbluesbluesy
In the 1960s and 1970s, a hybrid form called blues rock developed, which blended blues styles with rock music.
Blues rock is a fusion genre combining elements of blues and rock.

Country blues

folk bluesacoustic bluesfolk-blues
Blues subgenres include country blues, such as Delta blues and Piedmont blues, as well as urban blues styles such as Chicago blues and West Coast blues.
Country blues (also folk blues, rural blues, backwoods blues, or downhome blues) is one of the earliest forms of blues music.

Blue note

blue notesblueblue seventh
Blue notes (or "worried notes"), usually thirds, fifths or sevenths flattened in pitch are also an essential part of the sound.
In jazz and blues, a blue note is a note that—for expressive purposes—is sung or played at a slightly different pitch than standard.

West Coast blues

West CoastWestern blues
Blues subgenres include country blues, such as Delta blues and Piedmont blues, as well as urban blues styles such as Chicago blues and West Coast blues.
The West Coast blues is a type of blues influenced by jazz and jump blues, with strong piano-dominated sounds and jazzy guitar solos, which originated from Texas blues players who relocated to California in the 1940s.

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Blind LemonLemon JeffersonBlind Lemon" Jefferson
For instance Blind Lemon Jefferson's "Rising High Water Blues" (1927) tells of the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927:
Lemon Henry "Blind Lemon" Jefferson (September 24, 1893 – December 19, 1929) was an American blues and gospel singer-songwriter and musician.

Hokum

hokum blueshillbilly hokum
Hokum blues celebrated both comedic lyrical content and a boisterous, farcical performance style.
Hokum is a particular song type of American blues music—a humorous song which uses extended analogies or euphemistic terms to make sexual innuendos.

Dirty blues

The Copulatin' Collection
Blues songs with sexually explicit lyrics were known as dirty blues.
Dirty blues encompasses forms of blues music that deal with socially taboo subjects and obscenity, including sexual acts and/or references to drug use of some kind.

Tampa Red

Hudson WhittakerHudson Woodbridge
Tampa Red's classic "Tight Like That" (1928) is a sly wordplay with the double meaning of being "tight" with someone coupled with a more salacious physical familiarity.
Tampa Red is best known as a blues guitarist who had a distinctive single-string slide style.

Reverend Gary Davis

Rev. Gary DavisGary DavisBlind Gary Davis
Reverend Gary Davis and Blind Willie Johnson are examples of artists often categorized as blues musicians for their music, although their lyrics clearly belong to spirituals.
Reverend Gary Davis, also Blind Gary Davis (born Gary D. Davis, April 30, 1896 – May 5, 1972), was a blues and gospel singer who was also proficient on the banjo, guitar and harmonica.

Rock and roll

rockrock 'n' rollrock & roll
The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.
Particularly significant influences were jazz, blues, gospel, country, and folk.

Field holler

field hollersfield callhollers
Blues incorporated spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts, chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads.
The Afro-American music form ultimately influenced strands of African American music, such as the blues, rhythm and blues, and spirituals.

Bessie Smith

BessieBessie "The Empress of the Blues" SmithBessie's Blues
With the popularity of early performers, such as Bessie Smith, use of the twelve-bar blues spread across the music industry during the 1920s and 30s.
Bessie Smith (April 15, 1894 – September 26, 1937) was an American blues singer.

Big Bill Broonzy

BroonzyWilliam BroonzyWillie Broonzy
Other chord progressions, such as 8-bar forms, are still considered blues; examples include "How Long Blues", "Trouble in Mind", and Big Bill Broonzy's "Key to the Highway".
Big Bill Broonzy (born Lee Conley Bradley, June 26, 1903 – August 14, 1958) was an American blues singer, songwriter and guitarist.

How Long, How Long Blues

How Long BluesHow LongHow Long–How Long Blues
Other chord progressions, such as 8-bar forms, are still considered blues; examples include "How Long Blues", "Trouble in Mind", and Big Bill Broonzy's "Key to the Highway".
"How Long, How Long Blues" (also known as "How Long Blues" or "How Long How Long") is a blues song recorded by the American blues duo Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell in 1928.

Ray Charles

I Believe to My SoulRay Charles BandCharles
There are also 16-bar blues, such as Ray Charles's instrumental "Sweet 16 Bars" and Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man".
Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic.

Call and response (music)

call and responsecall-and-responsecall-response
The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.
These include soul, gospel, blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll, funk and hip hop.