Bob Clampett

Robert ClampettBob Clampett ProductionsClampettR. ClampettRobert Clampett, Jr.
Robert Emerson Clampett (May 8, 1913 – May 2, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes animated series from Warner Bros., and the television shows Time for Beany and Beany and Cecil.wikipedia
399 Related Articles

Beany and Cecil

Beanie and CecilBeany Copter" hatCecil
Robert Emerson Clampett (May 8, 1913 – May 2, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes animated series from Warner Bros., and the television shows Time for Beany and Beany and Cecil.
Beany and Cecil is an animated television series created by Bob Clampett for the American Broadcasting Company.

The Great Piggy Bank Robbery

Duck Twacy
Among Clampett's most acclaimed films are Porky in Wackyland (1938) and The Great Piggy Bank Robbery (1946).
It was directed by Robert Clampett, and features Daffy Duck in Clampett's penultimate Warner cartoon, produced shortly before he left the studio.

Porky in Wackyland

Wackylandcaged hooligansYoyo Dodo
Among Clampett's most acclaimed films are Porky in Wackyland (1938) and The Great Piggy Bank Robbery (1946).
Porky in Wackyland is a 1938 animated short film, directed by Robert Clampett for Leon Schlesinger Productions as part of Warner Bros.' Looney Tunes series.

Daffy Duck

DaffyBaby DaffyDaffy Duck/the Easter Bunny
Clampett was promoted to a directorial position in 1937 and during his fifteen years at the studio, directed 84 cartoons later deemed classic and designed some of the studio's most famous characters, including Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, and Tweety.
Directors such as Bob Clampett, Robert McKimson, and Chuck Jones are notable examples of the character.

Time for Beany

Robert Emerson Clampett (May 8, 1913 – May 2, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes animated series from Warner Bros., and the television shows Time for Beany and Beany and Cecil.
It was created by animator Bob Clampett, who later reused its main characters for the animated series Beany and Cecil.

Tweety

Tweety BirdTweety PieBaby Tweety
Clampett was promoted to a directorial position in 1937 and during his fifteen years at the studio, directed 84 cartoons later deemed classic and designed some of the studio's most famous characters, including Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, and Tweety. Clampett later created the character of Tweety, introduced in A Tale of Two Kitties in 1942.
In his early appearances in Bob Clampett cartoons, Tweety is a very aggressive character who tries anything to foil his foe, even kicking his enemy when he is down.

Looney Tunes

Looney TuneThe Bugs n' Daffy ShowLoony Tunes
Robert Emerson Clampett (May 8, 1913 – May 2, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes animated series from Warner Bros., and the television shows Time for Beany and Beany and Cecil.
New directors including Tex Avery, Friz Freleng and Bob Clampett were brought in or promoted to work with animators in the Schlesinger studio, with Avery's unit housed in a bungalow the animators dubbed "Termite Terrace."

Warner Bros. Cartoons

Leon Schlesinger ProductionsWarner Bros.Leon Schlesinger Studios
The two series were produced at Harman-Ising until mid-1933 when they split into Leon Schlesinger Productions.
Many of the creative staff members at the studio, including directors and animators such as Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson, Tex Avery, Robert Clampett, Arthur Davis and Frank Tashlin, are considered major figures in the art and history of traditional animation.

Warner Bros.

Warner BrothersWarner Bros. PicturesWarner Bros
Robert Emerson Clampett (May 8, 1913 – May 2, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes animated series from Warner Bros., and the television shows Time for Beany and Beany and Cecil.
By the end of World War II, a new Schlesinger production team, including directors Friz Freleng (started in 1934), Tex Avery (started in 1935), Frank Tashlin (started in 1936), Bob Clampett (started in 1937), Chuck Jones (started in 1938), and Robert McKimson (started in 1946), was formed.

When's Your Birthday?

Clampett was promoted to director in late 1936, directing a color sequence in the feature When's Your Birthday? (1937).
While original prints of this film had a cartoon sequence in Technicolor directed by Bob Clampett and Leon Schlesinger, most prints (including the Internet Archive) have the sequence in black-and-white.

A Tale of Two Kitties

Tale of Two Kitties, A
Clampett later created the character of Tweety, introduced in A Tale of Two Kitties in 1942.
A Tale of Two Kitties is a 1942 Merrie Melodies cartoon directed by Bob Clampett, written by Warren Foster, and features music by Carl W. Stalling.

The Hep Cat

Milton Gray notes that from The Hep Cat (1942) on, the cartoons become even more wild as Clampett's experimentation reached a peak.
The Hep Cat is a 1942 Warner Bros. cartoon directed by Bob Clampett, written by Warren Foster, animated primarily by Robert McKimson, and set to a musical score composed by Carl Stalling.

The Big Snooze

The Big Snooze was his final cartoon with the studio, and one for which he did not get screen credit (only one of three he directed pitting Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd).
The Big Snooze is a 1946 Warner Bros. Looney Tunes cartoon directed by an uncredited Bob Clampett.

Chuck Jones

Charles M. JonesCharles JonesThe Chuck Jones Show
They were soon joined by animators Chuck Jones, Virgil Ross, and Sid Sutherland, and worked virtually without interference on their new, groundbreaking style of humor for the next year.
He also said that the "feud" that there may have been between Jones and colleague Bob Clampett was mainly because they were so different from each other.

Screen Gems

Winkler ProductionsScreen Gems TelevisionScreen Gems Broadcasting
Clampett worked for a time at Screen Gems, then the cartoon division of Columbia Pictures, as a screenwriter and gag writer.
Animators, directors, and writers at the series included people such as Art Davis, Sid Marcus, Bob Wickersham, and during its latter period, Bob Clampett.

My Green Fedora

Clampett's story won first prize and was made into My Green Fedora, also directed by Freleng.
My Green Fedora is a 1935 Merrie Melodies animated short film directed by Friz Freleng, produced by Leon Schlesinger and animated by Chuck Jones and Robert Clampett.

Otis College of Art and Design

Otis Art InstituteOtis College of Art & DesignOtis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design
In addition, they paid his way through Otis Art Institute, where Clampett learned to paint with oils and to sculpt.

Herbert Hoover High School (Glendale)

Herbert Hoover High SchoolHoover High SchoolGlendale (CA) Hoover
Clampett attended both Glendale High School and Hoover High School in Glendale, California but left Hoover a few months short of graduating in 1931.

Stan Freberg

Stan FreburgHunter FrebergJohn and Marsha
The show, featuring the talents of voice artists Stan Freberg and Daws Butler, would earn Clampett three Emmys.
His first notable cartoon voice work was in a Warner Brothers cartoon called For He's a Jolly Good Fala, which was recorded but never filmed (due to the death of Fala's owner, President Franklin D. Roosevelt), followed by Roughly Squeaking (1946) as Bertie; and in 1947, he was heard in It's a Grand Old Nag (Charlie Horse), produced and directed by Bob Clampett for Republic Pictures; The Goofy Gophers (Tosh), and One Meat Brawl (Grover Groundhog and Walter Winchell).

Porky's Badtime Story

Clampett's first cartoon with a directorial credit was Porky's Badtime Story.
The cartoon was directed by Robert Clampett.

Tex Avery

Fred AveryDoggone TiredFred "Tex" Avery
After Schlesinger realized he needed another unit, he made a deal with Tex Avery, naming Clampett his collaborator.
Avery was granted exclusive use of four animators: Bob Clampett, Chuck Jones, Sid Sutherland and Virgil Ross.

Charlotte Clark

Afterwards, Clampett found a job working at a doll factory owned by his aunt, Charlotte Clark.
She is also related to Looney Tunes director Bob Clampett.

Bugs Bunny

BugsBaby BugsHappy Rabbit
The Big Snooze was his final cartoon with the studio, and one for which he did not get screen credit (only one of three he directed pitting Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd).
Immediately following on A Wild Hare, Bob Clampett's Patient Porky (1940) features a cameo appearance by Bugs, announcing to the audience that 750 rabbits have been born.

Gabby Goat

These shorts featured the short-lived and generally unpopular Gabby Goat as Porky's sidekick.
Bob Clampett created Gabby to be a sidekick for Porky Pig in the 1937 short Porky and Gabby, directed by Ub Iwerks, who briefly subcontracted to Leon Schlesinger Productions, producers of the Looney Tunes shorts.

Virgil Ross

Virgil Walter Ross
They were soon joined by animators Chuck Jones, Virgil Ross, and Sid Sutherland, and worked virtually without interference on their new, groundbreaking style of humor for the next year.
In 1935, he moved on to work for Leon Schlesinger at Warner Bros. where he spent about 30 years, first under Tex Avery's supervision, and then Bob Clampett in 1942.