Bob Kane

Elizabeth SandersClip CarsonGingerOscar the GumshoeProfessor Doolittle
Robert Kane (born Robert Kahn ; October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book writer and artist who co-created, with Bill Finger, the DC Comics character Batman.wikipedia
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Bill Finger

William Finger
Robert Kane (born Robert Kahn ; October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book writer and artist who co-created, with Bill Finger, the DC Comics character Batman.
Milton Finger, known professionally as Bill Finger (February 8, 1914 – January 18, 1974), was an American comic strip and comic book writer best known as the co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, and the co-architect of the series' development.

Will Eisner

EisnerEisner, WillW. Eisner
A high school friend of fellow cartoonist and future Spirit creator Will Eisner, Robert Kahn graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School and then legally changed his name to Robert Kane.
In 1936, high-school friend and fellow cartoonist Bob Kane, of future Batman fame, suggested that the 19-year-old Eisner try selling cartoons to the new comic book Wow, What A Magazine! "Comic books" at the time were tabloid-sized collections of comic strip reprints in color.

Jumbo Comics

Among his work there was the funny animal feature "Peter Pupp" — which belied its look with overtones of "mystery and menace" — published in the U.K. comic magazine Wags and reprinted in Fiction House's Jumbo Comics.
Notable creators who worked on Jumbo Comics included Jack Kirby (working under a variety of pseudonyms), Bob Kane, Matt Baker, Mort Meskin, Lou Fine, Bob Powell, Mort Leav, Art Saaf, Dick Briefer, Lily Renée, and Ruth Roche.

DeWitt Clinton High School

De Witt Clinton High SchoolDeWitt ClintonDeWitt Clinton HS
A high school friend of fellow cartoonist and future Spirit creator Will Eisner, Robert Kahn graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School and then legally changed his name to Robert Kane.

Batman

Bruce WayneBruce Wayne / BatmanBruce Wayne/Batman
Robert Kane (born Robert Kahn ; October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book writer and artist who co-created, with Bill Finger, the DC Comics character Batman.
The character was created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger, and first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in 1939.

Jerry Robinson

Robinson Park
Within a year, Kane hired art assistants Jerry Robinson (initially as an inker) and George Roussos (backgrounds artist and letterer).
Robinson was a 17-year-old journalism student at Columbia University in 1939 when he was discovered by Batman creator Bob Kane, who hired him to work on that fledgling comic as an inker and letterer.

Mary Roberts Rinehart

Mary RinehartThe Breaking Pointthe butler
Kane said his influences for the character included actor Douglas Fairbanks' film portrayal of the swashbuckler Zorro; Leonardo da Vinci's diagram of the ornithopter, a flying machine with huge bat-like wings; and the 1930 film The Bat Whispers, based on Mary Rinehart's mystery novel The Circular Staircase (1908).
The latter influenced Bob Kane in the creation of Batman's iconography.

Inker

inkinginkedinks
Within a year, Kane hired art assistants Jerry Robinson (initially as an inker) and George Roussos (backgrounds artist and letterer).
Although some "star" creators' names (such as Simon and Kirby or Bob Kane) usually appeared at the beginning of each story, the publisher generally didn't care which artists worked on the book.

Lew Sayre Schwartz

Lew Schwartz
After the strip finished in 1946, Kane returned to the comic books but, unknown to DC, had hired his own personal ghosts, including Lew Schwartz and Sheldon Moldoff from 1953-1967.
Lewis Sayre Schwartz (July 24, 1926 – June 18, 2011) was an American comic book artist, advertising creator and filmmaker, credited as a ghost artist for Bob Kane on DC Comics Batman from 1946-47 through 1953, and with writer David Vern Reed, as co-creator of the villain Deadshot.

Sheldon Moldoff

After the strip finished in 1946, Kane returned to the comic books but, unknown to DC, had hired his own personal ghosts, including Lew Schwartz and Sheldon Moldoff from 1953-1967.
Sheldon Moldoff (April 14, 1920 – February 29, 2012) was an American comics artist best known for his early work on the DC Comics characters Hawkman and Hawkgirl, and as one of Bob Kane's primary "ghost artists" (uncredited collaborators) on the superhero Batman.

Dick Grayson

RobinNightwingBatman
The new character, an orphaned circus performer named Dick Grayson, came to live with Bruce Wayne as his young ward in Detective Comics #38 (April 1940) and would inspire many similar sidekicks throughout the Golden Age of comic books.
Created by writer Bill Finger and artist Bob Kane, he first appeared in Detective Comics #38 in April 1940 as the original incarnation of Robin.

Joker (character)

JokerThe JokerJoker venom
Batman's nemesis the Joker was introduced near that same time, in Batman #1 (Spring 1940).
The Joker is a supervillain created by Bill Finger, Bob Kane, and Jerry Robinson who first appeared in the debut issue of the comic book Batman (April 25, 1940), published by DC Comics.

George Roussos

Roussos, George
Within a year, Kane hired art assistants Jerry Robinson (initially as an inker) and George Roussos (backgrounds artist and letterer).
The following year, Bob Kane and Bill Finger hired him to assist inker Jerry Robinson on Batman stories.

Eisner & Iger

Eisner and Iger StudioJerry Iger StudioW. Morgan Thomas
The following year, Kane began to work at Iger's subsequent studio, Eisner & Iger, which was one of the first comic book "packagers" that produced comics on demand for publishers entering the new medium during its late-1930s and 1940s Golden Age.
Other future luminaries who worked there included Lou Fine, Bob Kane, Wallace Wood, Bob Powell and Jules Feiffer.

Win Mortimer

Winslow Mortimer
DC Comics artists ghosting the comic-book stories now included Jack Burnley and Win Mortimer, with Robinson moving up as penciler and Fred Ray contributing some covers.
1945); contractually credited to Bob Kane, it is also signed "Mortimer."

List of Harvey Award winners

Jack Kirby Hall of FameHarvey AwardsBest Graphic Album of Previously Published Work
He was inducted into the comic book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1994 and into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1996.

Two-Face

Harvey DentHarvey Dent / Two-FaceHarvey Dent/Two-Face
According to comics historian Les Daniels, "nearly everyone seems to agree that Two-Face was Kane's brainchild exclusively".
The character was created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger and first appeared in Detective Comics #66 (August 1942).

Catwoman

Selina KyleSelina Kyle / CatwomanSelina Kyle/Catwoman
Catwoman, originally introduced by Kane with no costume as "the Cat", was partially inspired by his cousin, Ruth Steel.
Catwoman is a fictional character created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane who appears in American comic books published by DC Comics, commonly in association with superhero Batman.

Gardner Fox

Gardner F. FoxRod GrayNelson, Bruce
Future Justice League writer Gardner Fox wrote some early scripts, including the two-part story "The Monk" that introduced some of The Batman's first "Bat-" equipment.
During July 1939, just two issues after debut of the character Batman by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger, Fox wrote the first of his several tales for that character, introducing an early villain in the story "The Batman Meets Doctor Death".

Scarecrow (DC Comics)

ScarecrowThe ScarecrowJonathan Crane
Kane created the Scarecrow and drew his first appearance, which was scripted by Finger.
The Scarecrow (Jonathan Crane) is a fictional supervillain appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, created by Bill Finger, Bob Kane, and Jerry Robinson.

Clayface

Basil KarloEthan BennettClayface / Matt Hagen
Kane also created the original incarnation of Clayface.
Created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane, the original Clayface (Basil Karlo) appeared in Detective Comics #40 (June 1940) as a B-list actor who began a life of crime using the identity of a villain that he had portrayed in a horror film that he had starred in.

Penguin (character)

PenguinThe PenguinOswald Cobblepot
According to Kane, he drew the Penguin after being inspired by the then advertising mascot of Kool cigarettes — a penguin with a top hat and cane.
The character made his first appearance in Detective Comics #58 (December 1941) and was created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger.

Courageous Cat and Minute Mouse

Courageous Cat
He enjoyed a post-comics career in television animation, creating the characters Courageous Cat and Cool McCool, and as a painter showed his work in art galleries, although some of these paintings were produced by ghost artists.
The characters were created by Bob Kane as a spoof of his earlier creations, Batman and Robin.

Dick Sprang

Sprang Hall
Shortly afterward, when DC wanted more Batman stories than Kane's studio could deliver, the company assigned Dick Sprang and other in-house pencilers as "ghost artists", drawing uncredited under Kane's supervision.
Anticipating that Batman creator Bob Kane would be drafted to serve in World War II, DC inventoried Sprang's work to safeguard against delays.

Cool McCool

He enjoyed a post-comics career in television animation, creating the characters Courageous Cat and Cool McCool, and as a painter showed his work in art galleries, although some of these paintings were produced by ghost artists.
It was created by Bob Kane – most famous as one of the creators of Batman – and produced by Al Brodax for King Features.