Bob Woodward

WoodwardWoodward, BobRobert WoodwardWoodward, RobertElsa WalshRobert "Bob" Upshur WoodwardRobert U. Woodward
Robert Upshur Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is an American investigative journalist.wikipedia
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The Washington Post

Washington Postwashingtonpost.comWashington Post Magazine
He has worked for The Washington Post since 1971 as a reporter, and is currently an associate editor.
In the early 1970s, in the best-known episode in the newspaper's history, reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein led the American press's investigation into what became known as the Watergate scandal.

Carl Bernstein

BernsteinBernstein, Carl
While a young reporter for The Washington Post in 1972, Woodward teamed up with Carl Bernstein; the two did much of the original news reporting on the Watergate scandal.
While a young reporter for The Washington Post in 1972, Bernstein was teamed up with Bob Woodward; the two did much of the original news reporting on the Watergate scandal.

Alfred E. Woodward

Alfred WoodwardAlfred Eno Woodward II
Woodward was born in Geneva, Illinois, the son of Jane (née Upshur) and Alfred Eno Woodward II, a lawyer who later became chief judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit Court.
Alfred Eno Woodward II (December 15, 1913 – February 20, 2007) was the Chief Judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit Court, DuPage County, Illinois, from 1973 to 1975 and the father of reporter and author Bob Woodward.

All the President's Men

book1974 non-fiction book of the same namebook of the same name
Their book about the scandal, All the President's Men, became a No.
All the President's Men is a 1974 non-fiction book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, two of the journalists who investigated the May 1972 break-in at the Watergate Office Building and the resultant political scandal for The Washington Post.

Deep Throat (Watergate)

Deep ThroatinformantDeep Bone
The book and movie also led to the enduring mystery of the identity of Woodward's secret Watergate informant known as Deep Throat, a reference to the title of a popular pornographic movie at the time.
Deep Throat is the pseudonym given to the secret informant who provided information in 1972 to Bob Woodward, who shared it with Carl Bernstein.

All the President's Men (film)

All the President's Men1976 film adaptationAll the President's Men Revisited
The 1976 film, starring Robert Redford as Woodward and Dustin Hoffman as Bernstein, transformed the reporters into celebrities and inspired a wave of interest in investigative journalism.
Directed by Alan J. Pakula with a screenplay by William Goldman, it is based on the 1974 non-fiction book of the same name by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, the two journalists investigating the Watergate scandal for The Washington Post.

The Final Days

book
Woodward and Bernstein followed up All the President’s Men with a second book on Watergate, entitled The Final Days (Simon and Schuster 1976), covering in extensive depth the period from November 1973 until President Nixon resigned in August 1974.
The Final Days is a 1976 non-fiction book written by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein about the Watergate scandal.

1996 United States campaign finance controversy

Chinagatecampaign finance controversyalleged Chinese attempts to influence American politics
China's alleged role in the 1996 United States campaign finance controversy first gained public attention when Woodward and Brian Duffy published a story stating that a United States Department of Justice investigation into the fund-raising activities had uncovered evidence that Chinese agents sought to direct contributions from foreign sources to the Democratic National Committee (DNC) before the 1996 presidential campaign.
While questions regarding the U.S. Democratic Party's fund-raising activities first arose over a Los Angeles Times article published on September 21, 1996, China's alleged role in the affair first gained public attention when Bob Woodward and Brian Duffy of The Washington Post published a story stating that a United States Department of Justice investigation into the fund-raising activities had uncovered evidence that agents of China sought to direct contributions from foreign sources to the Democratic National Committee (DNC) before the 1996 presidential campaign.

Harry M. Rosenfeld

Harry Rosenfeld
Harry M. Rosenfeld, the Post's metropolitan editor, gave him a two-week trial but did not hire him because of his lack of journalistic experience.
Though Post editor-in-chief Benjamin C. Bradlee gets most of the credit, managing editor Howard Simons and Rosenfeld worked most closely with reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein on developing the story.

Plan of Attack

Woodward's four books, Bush at War (2002), Plan of Attack (2004), State of Denial (2006), and The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006–2008) (2008) are detailed accounts of the Bush presidency, including the response to the September 11 attacks and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Plan of Attack is a 2004 book by the American author and investigative reporter Bob Woodward.

The War Within (Woodward book)

The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006–2008)The War Within'' (Woodward book)The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006-2008)
Woodward's four books, Bush at War (2002), Plan of Attack (2004), State of Denial (2006), and The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006–2008) (2008) are detailed accounts of the Bush presidency, including the response to the September 11 attacks and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006–2008) is a non-fiction book by Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward that was released by publisher Simon & Schuster on September 8, 2008.

Bush at War

Woodward's four books, Bush at War (2002), Plan of Attack (2004), State of Denial (2006), and The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006–2008) (2008) are detailed accounts of the Bush presidency, including the response to the September 11 attacks and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Bush at War is a 2002 book by Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward recounting President George W. Bush's responses to the September 11 attacks and his administration's handling of the subsequent War in Afghanistan.

Dustin Hoffman

Dusty' Hoffman
The 1976 film, starring Robert Redford as Woodward and Dustin Hoffman as Bernstein, transformed the reporters into celebrities and inspired a wave of interest in investigative journalism.
All the President's Men (1976) was made less than two years after the Watergate scandal, and starred Hoffman and Robert Redford as the real-life journalists, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, respectively.

Robert Redford

RedfordJeremiah JohnsonRobert
The 1976 film, starring Robert Redford as Woodward and Dustin Hoffman as Bernstein, transformed the reporters into celebrities and inspired a wave of interest in investigative journalism.
All the President's Men (1976), in which Redford and Hoffman play Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, was a landmark film for Redford.

Richard Nixon

Richard M. NixonNixonPresident Nixon
These scandals led to numerous government investigations and the eventual resignation of President Richard Nixon.
The Washington Post picked up on the story; reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward relied on an informant known as "Deep Throat"—later revealed to be Mark Felt, associate director at the FBI—to link the men to the Nixon administration.

Janet Cooke

Forfeiture
In September 1980, a Sunday feature story appeared on the front page of the Post titled "Jimmy's World" in which reporter Janet Cooke wrote a profile of the life of an eight-year-old heroin addict.
Although some within the Post doubted the story's veracity, the paper defended it and assistant managing editor Bob Woodward submitted the story for the Pulitzer Prize.

Wired (book)

Wired: The Short Life and Fast Times of John BelushiWiredbook of the same name
He also wrote the book Wired, about the Hollywood drug culture and the death of comic John Belushi.
Wired: The Short Life and Fast Times of John Belushi, is a 1984 non-fiction book by American journalist Bob Woodward about the American actor and comedian John Belushi.

Geneva, Illinois

GenevaGeneva, ILGeneva, Ill.
Woodward was born in Geneva, Illinois, the son of Jane (née Upshur) and Alfred Eno Woodward II, a lawyer who later became chief judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit Court.

Ben Bradlee

Benjamin C. BradleeBenjamin BradleeBenjamin Crowninshield Bradlee
Their work, under editor Ben Bradlee, became known for being the first to report on a number of political "dirty tricks" used by the Nixon re-election committee during his campaign for re-election.
He became a national figure during the, when he challenged the federal government over the right to publish the Pentagon Papers and oversaw the publication of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's stories documenting the Watergate scandal.

Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award

Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for Courage in Journalism
In 2012, Colby College presented Woodward with the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism as well as an honorary doctorate.

Montgomery County Sentinel

Montgomery SentinelMontgomery County Sentinel,The Montgomery County Sentinel
After a year at the Montgomery Sentinel, a weekly newspaper in the Washington, D.C., suburbs, Woodward was hired as a Post reporter in 1971.
Bob Woodward was hired as a reporter at the Sentinel after failing a two-week trial hiring at the Washington Post in 1970.

Investigative journalism

investigative journalistexposéinvestigative reporter
The 1976 film, starring Robert Redford as Woodward and Dustin Hoffman as Bernstein, transformed the reporters into celebrities and inspired a wave of interest in investigative journalism. Robert Upshur Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is an American investigative journalist.

Plame affair

Valerie Plame affairCIA leak scandalPlamegate
New York University professor Jay Rosen severely criticized Woodward for allegedly being co-opted by the Bush White House and also for not telling the truth about his role in the Plame affair, writing: "Not only is Woodward not in the hunt, but he is slowly turning into the hunted. Part of what remains to be uncovered is how Woodward was played by the Bush team, and what they thought they were doing by leaking to him, as well as what he did with the dubious information he got."
According to Isikoff, as based on his sources, Armitage told Bob Woodward Plame's identity three weeks before talking to Novak, and Armitage himself was aggressively investigated by special counsel Patrick Fitzgerald, but was never charged because Fitzgerald found no evidence that Armitage knew of Plame's covert CIA status when he talked to Novak and Woodward.

Leonard Downie Jr.

Leonard Downie, Jr.Leonard DownieLen Downie
Woodward apologized to Leonard Downie Jr., editor of The Washington Post, for not informing him earlier of the June 2003 conversation.
The New Muckrakers (New Republic Books, 1976) detailed the rise and impact of a new generation of investigative reporters, including his colleagues Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

Mark Felt

W. Mark FeltWilliam Mark FeltWilliam Mark Felt, Sr.
For more than 30 years, only Woodward, Bernstein, and a handful of others knew the informant's identity until it was claimed by his family to Vanity Fair magazine to be former Federal Bureau of Investigation Associate Director W. Mark Felt in May 2005.
In 2005, at age 91, Felt revealed that during his tenure as associate director of the FBI he had been the notorious anonymous source known as "Deep Throat" who had provided The Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein with critical information about the Watergate scandal that had ultimately led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon in 1974.