Boeing 747

Boeing 747-200747Boeing 747-100Boeing 747-200BBoeing 747-200FB747Boeing 747-121Boeing 747-400Boeing 747–200Boeing 747-206B
The Boeing 747 is an American wide-body commercial jet airliner and cargo aircraft.wikipedia
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Boeing 747 hull losses

lost
, 60 of the jets have been lost in accidents in which a total of 0 people died.
As of January 2017, a total of 61 Boeing 747 aircraft, or just under 4% of the total number of 747s built, first flown commercially in 1970, have been involved in accidents and incidents resulting in a hull loss, meaning that the aircraft has either been destroyed or has been damaged beyond economical repair.

Wide-body aircraft

wide-bodywidebodyjumbo jet
The Boeing 747 is an American wide-body commercial jet airliner and cargo aircraft.
The biggest wide-body aircraft are known as jumbo jets due to their very large size; examples include the Boeing 747 ("jumbo jet"), Airbus A380 ("superjumbo jet"), and Boeing 777X ("mini jumbo jet").

Boeing 747-8

Boeing 747-8F747-8B747-8
The newest version of the aircraft, the 747-8, is in production and received certification in 2011.
The 747-8 is the third generation of the 747, with a lengthened fuselage, redesigned wings, new engines, and improved efficiency.

Boeing Commercial Airplanes

BoeingBoeing 7x7 seriesCommercial Airplane Group
Manufactured by Boeing's Commercial Airplane unit in the United States, the 747 was originally planned to have 150 percent greater capacity than the Boeing 707, a common large commercial aircraft of the 1960s.
For model numbers in the 707 to 777 range, the model number consists of an airplane's model number, for example 707 or 747, followed by a dash and three digits that represent the series within the model, for example 707-320 or 747-400.

Douglas DC-8

DC-8Douglas DC-8-62McDonnell Douglas DC-8
The era of commercial jet transportation, led by the enormous popularity of the Boeing 707 and Douglas DC-8, had revolutionized long-distance travel.
Launched after the competing Boeing 707, the DC-8 nevertheless kept Douglas in a strong position in the airliner market, and remained in production until 1972 when it began to be superseded by larger wide-body designs, including the Boeing 747, McDonnell Douglas DC-10, and Lockheed L-1011 TriStar.

Joe Sutter

Joseph F. SutterJoseph SutterMr Joseph F. "Joe" Sutter
In 1965, Joe Sutter was transferred from Boeing's 737 development team to manage the design studies for the new airliner, already assigned the model number 747.
Joseph Frederick "Joe" Sutter (March 21, 1921 – August 30, 2016) was an American engineer for the Boeing Airplane Company and manager of the design team for the Boeing 747 under Malcolm T. Stamper, the head of the 747 project.

Juan Trippe

Juan T. TrippeJuan Terry TrippePresident
Even before it lost the CX-HLS contract, Boeing was asked by Juan Trippe, president of Pan American World Airways (Pan Am), one of their most important airline customers, to build a passenger aircraft more than twice the size of the 707.
He was instrumental in numerous revolutionary advances in airline history, including the development and production of the Boeing 314 Clipper, which opened trans-Pacific airline travel, the Boeing Stratoliner which helped to pioneer cabin pressurization, the Boeing 707 and the Boeing 747 which introduced the era of jumbo jets (evolved from Air Force bombers, tanker and transport design, respectively).

Double-deck aircraft

double-deckdouble deckerdouble-decker
The 747 uses a double-deck configuration for part of its length and is available in passenger, freighter, and other versions.
The first partial double-deck jet airliner was the widebody Boeing 747, in service from 1970, with the top deck smaller than the main deck.

Supersonic transport

SSTsupersonic airlinerhypersonic transport
Boeing expected supersonic airliners—the development of which was announced in the early 1960s—to render the 747 and other subsonic airliners obsolete, while the demand for subsonic cargo aircraft would remain robust well into the future.
When first designed, the SSTs were envisioned to compete with long-range aircraft seating 80 to 100 passengers such as the Boeing 707, but with newer aircraft such as the Boeing 747 carrying four times that, the speed and fuel advantages of the SST concept were taken away by sheer size.

El Al Flight 1862

Bijlmerramp18621992 Amsterdam plane crash
This measure caused anxiety when these aircraft crashed, for example El Al Flight 1862 at Amsterdam in 1992 with 282 kg of uranium in the tailplane (horizontal stabilizer).
On 4 October 1992, El Al Flight 1862, a Boeing 747 cargo aircraft of the then state-owned Israeli airline El Al, crashed into the Groeneveen and Klein-Kruitberg flats in the Bijlmermeer (colloquially "Bijlmer") neighbourhood (part of Amsterdam-Zuidoost) of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Cargo aircraft

transport aircraftcargo planecargo
The Boeing 747 is an American wide-body commercial jet airliner and cargo aircraft.
The Boeing 747 was originally designed to the same specification as the C-5, but later modified as a design that could be offered as either passenger or all-freight versions.

Pratt & Whitney JT9D

JT9DPW JT9DP&W JT9D
Pratt & Whitney was also working on the same principle and, by late 1966, Boeing, Pan Am and Pratt & Whitney agreed to develop a new engine, designated the JT9D to power the 747.
Its initial application was the Boeing 747-100, the original "Jumbo Jet".

Paine Field

Everett Army Air FieldSnohomish County AirportEverett
The company considered locations in about 50 cities, and eventually decided to build the new plant some 30 mi north of Seattle on a site adjoining a military base at Paine Field near Everett, Washington.
In 1966, the Boeing Company selected Paine Field for the site of its Everett assembly plant as part of the Boeing 747 program.

Seattle

Seattle, WashingtonSeattle, WACity of Seattle
The company considered locations in about 50 cities, and eventually decided to build the new plant some 30 mi north of Seattle on a site adjoining a military base at Paine Field near Everett, Washington.
Another major local economic downturn was in the late 1960s and early 1970s, at a time when Boeing was heavily affected by the oil crises, loss of Government contracts, and costs and delays associated with the Boeing 747.

GE Aviation

General ElectricGEGeneral Electric Aviation
In May 1964, airframe proposals arrived from Boeing, Douglas, General Dynamics, Lockheed, and Martin Marietta; engine proposals were submitted by General Electric, Curtiss-Wright, and Pratt & Whitney.
Although Lockheed later changed their engine to the Rolls-Royce RB211, the DC-10 continued with the CF6, and this success led to widespread sales on many large aircraft including the Boeing 747.

Boeing 767

Boeing 767-300ERBoeing 767-300Boeing 767-200
When economic problems in the US and other countries after the 1973 oil crisis led to reduced passenger traffic, several airlines found they did not have enough passengers to fly the 747 economically, and they replaced them with the smaller and recently introduced McDonnell Douglas DC-10 and Lockheed L-1011 TriStar trijet wide bodies (and later the 767 and A300/A310 twinjets).
Designed as a smaller wide-body airliner than earlier aircraft such as the 747, the 767 has a seating capacity for 181 to 375 people, and a design range of 3850 to 6385 nmi, depending on variant.

Boeing 747SP

747SPBoeing 747SP-09B747SP
The shortened 747SP (special performance) with a longer range was also developed, and entered service in 1976.
The Boeing 747SP is a version of the Boeing 747 jet airliner which was designed for ultra-long-range flights.

Everett, Washington

EverettEverett, WACity of Everett
The company considered locations in about 50 cities, and eventually decided to build the new plant some 30 mi north of Seattle on a site adjoining a military base at Paine Field near Everett, Washington.
The Boeing Company selected a 780 acre plot of land north of the airport in June 1966 to build a new airplane factory for its Boeing 747 passenger jetliner, which would become the world's first "jumbo jet".

Paris Air Show

Paris AirshowSalon de l'AéronautiqueLe Bourget
However, these difficulties did not prevent Boeing from taking a test aircraft to the 28th Paris Air Show in mid-1969, where it was displayed to the public for the first time.
"The largest plane in the world," the Boeing 747 jet airliner, arrived on June 3, after flying non-stop from Seattle, Washington, and the Apollo 8 command module, charred by its re-entry, was there flanked by the Apollo 9 astronauts, but the most-viewed exhibit was the supersonic Concorde, which made its first flight over Paris as the show opened.

John F. Kennedy International Airport

JFK AirportIdlewild AirportJFK International Airport
During the 1970s and 1980s, there was often over 30 regularly scheduled 747s at John F. Kennedy International Airport.
(National Airlines and British Airways arrived later.) The airport was designed for aircraft up to 300000 lb gross weight The airport had to be modified in the late 1960s to accommodate the Boeing 747's weight.

Airbus A380

A380Airbus A380-800Airbus A380 airliner
In 2000, Boeing offered the more modest 747X and 747X stretch derivatives as alternatives to the Airbus A3XX.
Airbus studies started in 1988 and the project was announced in 1990 to challenge the dominance of the Boeing 747 in the long haul market.

Lockheed C-5 Galaxy

C-5 GalaxyC-5C-5A Galaxy
In 1965, Lockheed's aircraft design and General Electric's engine design were selected for the new C-5 Galaxy transport, which was the largest military aircraft in the world at the time.
However, they rejected it in favor of the Boeing 747, in part due to the 747's low-wing design.

Pan American World Airways

Pan AmPan American AirwaysPan American
Even before it lost the CX-HLS contract, Boeing was asked by Juan Trippe, president of Pan American World Airways (Pan Am), one of their most important airline customers, to build a passenger aircraft more than twice the size of the 707.
Pan Am was the launch customer of the Boeing 747, placing a $525 million order for 25 in April 1966.

Boeing 707

707Boeing 707-300Boeing 707-321B
Manufactured by Boeing's Commercial Airplane unit in the United States, the 747 was originally planned to have 150 percent greater capacity than the Boeing 707, a common large commercial aircraft of the 1960s. The era of commercial jet transportation, led by the enormous popularity of the Boeing 707 and Douglas DC-8, had revolutionized long-distance travel.
Boeing's answer to the problem was the first wide-body airliner—the Boeing 747.

McDonnell Douglas DC-10

McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30DC-10Douglas DC-10
When economic problems in the US and other countries after the 1973 oil crisis led to reduced passenger traffic, several airlines found they did not have enough passengers to fly the 747 economically, and they replaced them with the smaller and recently introduced McDonnell Douglas DC-10 and Lockheed L-1011 TriStar trijet wide bodies (and later the 767 and A300/A310 twinjets).
In 1966, American Airlines offered a specification to manufacturers for a widebody aircraft smaller than the Boeing 747 but capable of flying similar long-range routes from airports with shorter runways.