Bog

peat bogbogspeat bogsmiresphagnum bogquaking bograised bogboglandboggyquagmire
A bog or bogland is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss.wikipedia
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Peat

turfpeat cuttingpeat extraction
A bog or bogland is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss.
It is unique to natural areas called peatlands, bogs, mires, moors, or muskegs.

Wetland

wetlandscoastal wetlandwetland habitat
A bog or bogland is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss.
The main wetland types are swamp, marsh, bog, and fen; sub-types include mangrove forest, carr, pocosin, floodplains, mire, vernal pool, sink, and many others.

Fen

fenlandfensFen meadow
Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire, and muskeg; alkaline mires are called fens.
A fen is one of the main types of Wetlands, the others being grassy marshes, forested swamps, and peaty bogs.

Muskeg

muskegs
Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire, and muskeg; alkaline mires are called fens.
Muskeg is approximately synonymous with bogland, but "muskeg" is the standard term in Western Canada and Alaska, while 'bog' is common elsewhere.

Mire

peatlandpeatlandsquagmire
Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire, and muskeg; alkaline mires are called fens.
There are four types of mire: bog, fen, marsh and swamp.

Carnivorous plant

carnivorous plantscarnivorousinsectivorous plant
Carnivorous plants such as sundews (Drosera) and pitcher plants (for example Sarracenia purpurea) have adapted to the low-nutrient conditions by using invertebrates as a nutrient source.
Carnivorous plants have adapted to grow in places where the soil is thin or poor in nutrients, especially nitrogen, such as acidic bogs.

Biodiversity

diversitybiological diversitybiodiverse
Bogs have distinctive assemblages of animal, fungal and plant species, and are of high importance for biodiversity, particularly in landscapes that are otherwise settled and farmed.
Many regions of high biodiversity and/or endemism arise from specialized habitats which require unusual adaptations, for example, alpine environments in high mountains, or Northern European peat bogs.

Ombrotrophic

ombotrophicombrotrophy
In some cases, the water is derived entirely from precipitation, in which case they are termed ombrotrophic (cloud-fed).
The vegetation of ombrotrophic peatlands is often bog, dominated by Sphagnum mosses.

Moss

mossesBryophytaMusci
A bog or bogland is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss.
Moss species can be classed as growing on: rocks, exposed mineral soil, disturbed soils, acid soil, calcareous soil, cliff seeps and waterfall spray areas, streamsides, shaded humusy soil, downed logs, burnt stumps, tree trunk bases, upper tree trunks, and tree branches or in bogs.

Tannin

tanninshamamelitannintan
Water flowing out of bogs has a characteristic brown colour, which comes from dissolved peat tannins.
Water flowing out of bogs has a characteristic brown color from dissolved peat tannins.

Siberia

SiberianEastern SiberiaEast Siberia
The world's largest wetland is the peat bogs of the Western Siberian Lowlands in Russia, which cover more than a million square kilometres.
The frozen peat bogs in this region may hold billions of tons of methane gas, which may be released into the atmosphere.

Raised bog

raisedraised peat bogsKermi bog
They thus represent a special type of bog, hydrologically, ecologically and in terms of their development history, in which the growth of peat mosses over centuries or millennia plays a decisive role.

String bog

In periglacial climates a patterned form of blanket bog may occur, known as a string bog.
A string bog or strong mire is a bog consisting of slightly elevated ridges and islands, with woody plants, alternating with flat, wet sedge mat areas.

Hudson Bay Lowlands

Hudson Bay LowlandJames Bay LowlandsHudson/James Bay Lowlands
Large peat bogs also occur in North America, particularly the Hudson Bay Lowland and the Mackenzie River Basin.
A majority of the wetland is peat bog, although salt marshes occur along the coast, and marshes and wet meadows occur along the major rivers.

Vegetation

vegetativevegetatedvegetative cover
In cool climates with consistently high rainfall (on more than c. 235 days a year), the ground surface may remain waterlogged for much of the time, providing conditions for the development of bog vegetation.
Primeval redwood forests, coastal mangrove stands, sphagnum bogs, desert soil crusts, roadside weed patches, wheat fields, cultivated gardens and lawns; all are encompassed by the term vegetation.

Sphagnum

sphagnum mosspeat mossbog moss
A bog or bogland is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss. The bog vegetation, mostly sphagnum moss anchored by sedges (such as Carex lasiocarpa), forms a floating mat approximately half a meter thick on the surface of the water or on top of very wet peat.
Hence, as sphagnum moss grows, it can slowly spread into drier conditions, forming larger mires, both raised bogs and blanket bogs.

Drosera

sundewsundewspygmy sundew
Carnivorous plants such as sundews (Drosera) and pitcher plants (for example Sarracenia purpurea) have adapted to the low-nutrient conditions by using invertebrates as a nutrient source.
Common habitats include bogs, fens, swamps, marshes, the tepuis of Venezuela, the wallums of coastal Australia, the fynbos of South Africa, and moist streambanks.

Palsa

Palsa bogpalsaspermafrost plateau
Surface water, found in bogs, enhances palsa formation in areas called palsa bogs.

Ericaceae

heatherheath familyEpacridaceae
They are frequently covered in ericaceous shrubs rooted in the sphagnum moss and peat.
This plant family is also typical of peat bogs and blanket bogs; examples include Rhododendron groenlandicum and Kalmia polifolia.

Floating mat

The bog vegetation, mostly sphagnum moss anchored by sedges (such as Carex lasiocarpa), forms a floating mat approximately half a meter thick on the surface of the water or on top of very wet peat.
This type of habitat is protected and is designated in the European Habitats Directive as "LRT No. 7140 Transition and Floating Mat Bogs".

Marsh

marshlandmarshesmarshlands
These develop from a lake or flat marshy area, over either non-acidic or acidic substrates.
The pH in marshes tends to be neutral to alkaline, as opposed to bogs, where peat accumulates under more acid conditions.

Phaonia jaroschewskii

P. jaroschewskii
Bogs even have distinctive insects; English bogs give a home to a yellow fly called the hairy canary fly (Phaonia jaroschewskii), and bogs in North America are habitat for a butterfly called the bog copper (Lycaena epixanthe).
This species is found on sphagnum moss on healthy wet bog ecosystems.

Cataract bog

A cataract bog is a rare ecological community formed where a permanent stream flows over a granite outcropping.
Bogs get water from the atmosphere, while fens get their water from groundwater seepage.

Soil

soilsdirtsoil moisture
These bogs are often still under the influence of mineral soil water (groundwater).
Depressions allow the accumulation of water, minerals and organic matter and in the extreme, the resulting soils will be saline marshes or peat bogs.

Cranberry

cranberriescranberry bogcranberry bogs
Blueberries, cranberries, cloudberries, huckleberries, and lingonberries are harvested from the wild in bogs.
They can be found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the Northern Hemisphere.