Bogie

trucksbogiestruckCleminson's patentpower bogiearticulated bogieArticulated lorriesbogie truckCommonwealth bogiestrucks (bogies)
A bogie (in some senses called a truck in North American English) is a chassis or framework that carries a wheelset, attached to a vehicle—a modular subassembly of wheels and axles.wikipedia
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Bogie exchange

Axle exchangebogie-changingbogies changed
A bogie may remain normally attached (as on many railroad cars and semi-trailers) or be quickly detachable (as the dolly in a road train or in railway bogie exchange); it may contain a suspension within it (as most rail and trucking bogies do), or be solid and in turn be suspended (as most bogies of tracked vehicles are); it may be mounted on a swivel, as traditionally on a railway carriage or locomotive, additionally jointed and sprung (as in the landing gear of an airliner), or held in place by other means (centreless bogies).
To perform a bogie exchange, a car is converted from one gauge to another by removing the bogies or trucks (the chassis containing the wheels and axles of the car), and installing a new bogie with differently spaced wheels.

Wheelset (rail transport)

wheelsetwheelsetswheel sets
A bogie (in some senses called a truck in North American English) is a chassis or framework that carries a wheelset, attached to a vehicle—a modular subassembly of wheels and axles.
The frame assembly beneath each end of a car, railcar or locomotive that holds the wheelsets is called the bogie (or truck in North America).

Dolly (trailer)

dollydolliesdetachable dolly
A bogie may remain normally attached (as on many railroad cars and semi-trailers) or be quickly detachable (as the dolly in a road train or in railway bogie exchange); it may contain a suspension within it (as most rail and trucking bogies do), or be solid and in turn be suspended (as most bogies of tracked vehicles are); it may be mounted on a swivel, as traditionally on a railway carriage or locomotive, additionally jointed and sprung (as in the landing gear of an airliner), or held in place by other means (centreless bogies).
There are several types of dolly bogie:

Train wheel

wheelswheelcarwheel
A bogie (in some senses called a truck in North American English) is a chassis or framework that carries a wheelset, attached to a vehicle—a modular subassembly of wheels and axles.
A rolling component is typically pressed onto an axle and mounted directly on a rail car or locomotive or indirectly on a bogie (UK), also called a truck (North America).

Railroad car

railway carriagecarsrailway car
A bogie may remain normally attached (as on many railroad cars and semi-trailers) or be quickly detachable (as the dolly in a road train or in railway bogie exchange); it may contain a suspension within it (as most rail and trucking bogies do), or be solid and in turn be suspended (as most bogies of tracked vehicles are); it may be mounted on a swivel, as traditionally on a railway carriage or locomotive, additionally jointed and sprung (as in the landing gear of an airliner), or held in place by other means (centreless bogies). Usually, two bogies are fitted to each carriage, wagon or locomotive, one at each end.
Indian English sometimes uses "bogie" in the same manner, though the term has other meanings in other variants of English.

Landing gear

undercarriagemonowheelmonowheel gear
A bogie may remain normally attached (as on many railroad cars and semi-trailers) or be quickly detachable (as the dolly in a road train or in railway bogie exchange); it may contain a suspension within it (as most rail and trucking bogies do), or be solid and in turn be suspended (as most bogies of tracked vehicles are); it may be mounted on a swivel, as traditionally on a railway carriage or locomotive, additionally jointed and sprung (as in the landing gear of an airliner), or held in place by other means (centreless bogies).
The Airbus A340-500/-600 has an additional four-wheel undercarriage bogie on the fuselage centerline, much like the twin-wheel unit in the same general location, used on later DC-10 and MD-11 airliners.

Bogie bolster wagon

bogie wagonbogie bolsterbolster wagon
In South Africa, the term bogie is often alternatively used to refer to a freight or goods wagon (shortened from bogie wagon).
A bogie bolster has both bogies and bolsters.

Jacobs bogie

JacobsJakobs bogieTrucks
Another configuration is often used in articulated vehicles, which places the bogies (often Jacobs bogies) under the connection between the carriages or wagons.
Jacobs bogies (named after Wilhelm Jakobs,, 1858–1942, a German mechanical railway engineer) are a type of rail vehicle bogie commonly found on articulated railcars and tramway vehicles.

Span bolster

bolsters
Heavy-duty cars may have more than two bogies using span bolsters to equalize the load and connect the bogies to the cars.
A span bolster, in rail terminology, is a beam or frame used to link two trucks (US) or bogies (UK) so that they can be articulated together and be joined to the locomotive or railroad car at one rotating mounting point.

List of railroad truck parts

axle boxaxleboxjournal box
It was a heavy, cast-steel design weighing about 6.5 LT, with sealed roller bearings on the axle ends, avoiding the need to maintain axle box oil levels.
A bogie or railroad truck holds the wheel sets of a rail vehicle.

Articulated vehicle

articulatedarticulationarticulating
Another configuration is often used in articulated vehicles, which places the bogies (often Jacobs bogies) under the connection between the carriages or wagons.
Many train cars are made with articulated connections, sharing a common truck between two cars.

Semi-trailer

semi-trailerstrailerstrailer
A bogie may remain normally attached (as on many railroad cars and semi-trailers) or be quickly detachable (as the dolly in a road train or in railway bogie exchange); it may contain a suspension within it (as most rail and trucking bogies do), or be solid and in turn be suspended (as most bogies of tracked vehicles are); it may be mounted on a swivel, as traditionally on a railway carriage or locomotive, additionally jointed and sprung (as in the landing gear of an airliner), or held in place by other means (centreless bogies).

British Railways Mark 1

Mark 1British Rail Mark 1Mk1
Fitted with SKF or Timken bearings, it was introduced in the late 1950s for all BR Mark 1 vehicles.
Most had underframes 63 ft long, with bogies at 46 ft centres; the body was 64 ft long if the coach was gangwayed, or 63 ft if non-gangwayed.

HT-C truck

HT-CHTSCHTSC truck
Those commonly used in the North America include Type A, Blomberg, HT-C and Flexicoil trucks.
The HT-C locomotive truck, known as a bogie in the UK, was designed by Electro-Motive Diesel (EMD) and first mounted in 1970 under experimental EMD SD45X locomotives; after successful testing it was then made standard on 1972 through 1994 EMD Dash 2 (improved 40 series), and 50 series and 60 series six axle units.

Flexicoil suspension

FlexicoilFlexicoil truckFlexicoil lightweight
Those commonly used in the North America include Type A, Blomberg, HT-C and Flexicoil trucks.
It is a secondary suspension, installed between the body and the bogie of the locomotive, passenger car or wagon so fitted.

Blomberg B

BlombergBlomberg trucksBlomberg M
Those commonly used in the North America include Type A, Blomberg, HT-C and Flexicoil trucks.
The EMD#BlombergB is a 2 power axle locomotive bogie truck, introduced with the 1939 EMD#FT series, and were standard through their 1985~1994 GP60 series.

Bissel truck

pony truckBissel bogiepony trucks
On a steam locomotive, the leading and trailing wheels may be mounted on bogies like pony trucks or Bissel bogies.
A Bissell or Bissel truck (also Bissel bogie or Pony truck) is a single-axle bogie which pivots towards the centre of a steam locomotive to enable it to negotiate curves more easily.

Loading gauge

clearancegaugeW6
Usually, the train floor is at a level above the bogies, but the floor of the car may be lower between bogies, such as for a bilevel rail car to increase interior space while staying within height restrictions, or in easy-access, stepless-entry, low-floor trains.
The old standard North American passenger railcar is 10 ft wide by 14 ft high and measures 85 ft over coupler pulling faces with 59 ft truck centers, or 86 ft over coupler pulling faces with 60 ft truck centers.

Fairlie locomotive

FairlieDouble FairlieModified Fairlie
Articulated locomotives (e.g. Fairlie, Garratt or Mallet locomotives) have power bogies similar to those on diesel and electric locomotives.
A Fairlie is a type of articulated steam locomotive that has the driving wheels on bogies.

Leading wheel

leading truckleadingleading axle
On a steam locomotive, the leading and trailing wheels may be mounted on bogies like pony trucks or Bissel bogies.
The axle or axles of the leading wheels are normally located on a leading truck.

AAR type A switcher truck

AAR Type ABlomberg AAR Type AEMD AAR TypeA trucks
Those commonly used in the North America include Type A, Blomberg, HT-C and Flexicoil trucks.
The EMD#AAR Type A locomotive bogie truck was first introduced in 1935; it became standard on EMD switchers into the 1970s, and was also used on other makers locomotives.

Rollbock

roll-blockRollböckecarrying trucks
A rollbock is a specialized type of bogie that is inserted under the wheels of a rail wagon/car, usually to convert for another track gauge.
Rollbocks, sometimes called transporter trailers, are pre-coupled narrow gauge transporter trucks or bogies that allow a coupled train of standard gauge wagons to be automatically loaded or rolled onto so that the train can then continue through a change of gauge.

Electric locomotive

electricelectric locomotiveselectric trains
Modern diesel and electric locomotives are mounted on bogies.
However, they were much larger than the DC motors of the time and could not be mounted in underfloor bogies: they could only be carried within locomotive bodies.

Locomotive

locomotivesmixed trafficrailway locomotive
Usually, two bogies are fitted to each carriage, wagon or locomotive, one at each end.
However, they were much larger than the DC motors of the time and could not be mounted in underfloor bogies: they could only be carried within locomotive bodies.

Steam locomotive

steam locomotivessteamsteam train
On a steam locomotive, the leading and trailing wheels may be mounted on bogies like pony trucks or Bissel bogies.
To counter this, locomotives often fit unpowered carrying wheels mounted on two-wheeled trucks or four-wheeled bogies centred by springs/inverted rockers/geared rollers that help to guide the locomotive through curves.