Bohemia

BohemianBöhmenAustrian BohemiaCzechČechyBohemia properBoiohaemumHabsburg BohemiaKing of BohemiaKingdom of Bohemia
Bohemia (Čechy; ; Czechy; Bohemia; פּיהם ) is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic.wikipedia
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Czech Republic

CzechCZEthe Czech Republic
Bohemia (Čechy; ; Czechy; Bohemia; פּיהם ) is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic.
The Czech Republic includes the historical territories of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.

Moravia

Habsburg MoraviaMoravianMorava
In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings. Bohemia was bordered in the south by Upper and Lower Austria (both in Austria), in the west by Bavaria and in the north by Saxony and Lusatia (all in Germany), in the northeast by Silesia (in Poland), and in the east by Moravia (also part of the Czech Republic).
Moravia (, also, ; Morava ; Mähren ; Morawy ; Moravia) is a historical region in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia.

Czech lands

Czechhistorical landRegion
Bohemia (Čechy; ; Czechy; Bohemia; פּיהם ) is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic.
The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands (České země) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.

Czech Silesia

SilesiaSilesianMoravian Silesia
In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings.
While not today an administrative entity in itself, Czech Silesia is, together with Bohemia and Moravia, one of the three historical Czech lands.

Kingdom of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianBohemian Kingdom
Bohemia was a duchy of Great Moravia, later an independent principality, a kingdom in the Holy Roman Empire, and subsequently a part of the Habsburg Monarchy and the Austrian Empire.
The kings of Bohemia, besides Bohemia, also ruled the Lands of the Bohemian Crown, which at various times included Moravia, Silesia, Lusatia, and parts of Saxony, Brandenburg, and Bavaria.

Duchy of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianHistory of the Czech lands in the Middle Ages
Bohemia was a duchy of Great Moravia, later an independent principality, a kingdom in the Holy Roman Empire, and subsequently a part of the Habsburg Monarchy and the Austrian Empire.
The Bohemian lands separated from disintegrating Moravia after Duke Spytihněv swore fidelity to the East Frankish king Arnulf in 895.

Great Moravia

MoraviaGreat Moravian EmpireMoravians
Bohemia was a duchy of Great Moravia, later an independent principality, a kingdom in the Holy Roman Empire, and subsequently a part of the Habsburg Monarchy and the Austrian Empire.
Although the borders of his empire cannot be exactly determined, he controlled the core territories of Moravia as well as other neighbouring regions, including Bohemia, most of Slovakia and parts of Slovenia, Hungary, Poland and Ukraine, for some periods of his reign.

History of Czechoslovakia (1918–1938)

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakCzechoslovak state
After World War I and the establishment of an independent Czechoslovak state, the total of Bohemia became a part of Czechoslovakia, defying claims of the German speaking inhabitants that regions with German speaking majority should be included in the Republic of German-Austria.
The new state comprised the total of Bohemia whose borders did not coincide with the language border between German and Czech.

Second Czechoslovak Republic

Czechoslovakiathe remnants of the Czech stateSecond Republic
The remainder of Czech territory became the Second Czechoslovak Republic and was subsequently occupied as the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
It was composed of Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia and the autonomous regions of Slovakia and Subcarpathian Rus', the latter being renamed on 30 December 1938 to Carpathian Ukraine.

Sudetenland

SudetenSudeten crisisSudetenland Crisis
Between 1938 and 1945, these border regions were joined to Nazi Germany as the Sudetenland.
These German speakers had predominated in the border districts of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia from the time of the Austrian Empire.

Elbe

Elbe RiverRiver ElbeLabe
Bohemia's borders were mostly marked by mountain ranges such as the Bohemian Forest, the Ore Mountains, and the Krkonoše, a part of the Sudetes range; the Bohemian-Moravian border roughly follows the Elbe-Danube watershed.
It rises in the Krkonoše Mountains of the northern Czech Republic before traversing much of Bohemia (western half of the Czech Republic), then Germany and flowing into the North Sea at Cuxhaven, 110 km northwest of Hamburg.

Krkonoše

Giant MountainsKarkonoszeRiesengebirge
Bohemia's borders were mostly marked by mountain ranges such as the Bohemian Forest, the Ore Mountains, and the Krkonoše, a part of the Sudetes range; the Bohemian-Moravian border roughly follows the Elbe-Danube watershed.
The Czech-Polish border, which divides the historic regions of Bohemia and Silesia, runs along the main ridge.

Republic of German-Austria

German AustriaGerman-AustriaAustria
After World War I and the establishment of an independent Czechoslovak state, the total of Bohemia became a part of Czechoslovakia, defying claims of the German speaking inhabitants that regions with German speaking majority should be included in the Republic of German-Austria.
The assembly included representatives from Bohemia, Moravia, and Austrian Silesia who refused to submit to the new state of Czechoslovakia which had been declared on 28 October 1918.

Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
Bohemia was bordered in the south by Upper and Lower Austria (both in Austria), in the west by Bavaria and in the north by Saxony and Lusatia (all in Germany), in the northeast by Silesia (in Poland), and in the east by Moravia (also part of the Czech Republic).
In 1526, following the Battle of Mohács, Bohemia and the part of Hungary not occupied by the Ottomans came under Austrian rule.

Boii

BoianCeltsCeltic
In the 2nd century BC, the Romans were competing for dominance in northern Italy with various peoples including the Gauls-Celtic tribe Boii.
The Boii (Latin plural, singular Boius; ) were a Gallic tribe of the later Iron Age, attested at various times in Cisalpine Gaul (northern Italy), Pannonia (Hungary), parts of Bavaria, in and around Bohemia (after whom the region is named in most languages; comprising the bulk of the Czech Republic), parts of Poland, and Gallia Narbonensis.

Bohemian Forest

ŠumavaŠumava MountainsBöhmerwald
Bohemia's borders were mostly marked by mountain ranges such as the Bohemian Forest, the Ore Mountains, and the Krkonoše, a part of the Sudetes range; the Bohemian-Moravian border roughly follows the Elbe-Danube watershed.
In Czech, Šumava is also used as a name for the entire adjacent region in Bohemia.

Lusatia

LausitzUpper LusatiaUpper Lusatian
Bohemia was bordered in the south by Upper and Lower Austria (both in Austria), in the west by Bavaria and in the north by Saxony and Lusatia (all in Germany), in the northeast by Silesia (in Poland), and in the east by Moravia (also part of the Czech Republic).
Neighbouring regions were Silesia in the east, Bohemia in the south, the Margraviate of Meissen and the Duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg in the west as well as the Margraviate of Brandenburg (Mittelmark) in the north.

Marcomanni

Germanic MarcomannicMarcomaniiMarcomannic
In the area of modern Bohemia the Marcomanni and other Suebic groups were led by their king, Marobodus, after they had suffered defeat to Roman forces in Germany.
The Marcomanni were a Germanic tribal confederation who eventually came to live in a powerful kingdom north of the Danube, somewhere in the region near modern Bohemia, during the peak of power of the nearby Roman Empire.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechCzechoslovakian
After World War I and the establishment of an independent Czechoslovak state, the total of Bohemia became a part of Czechoslovakia, defying claims of the German speaking inhabitants that regions with German speaking majority should be included in the Republic of German-Austria.
It consisted of the present day territories of Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia and Carpathian Ruthenia.

Suebi

SueviSuevesSuebian
The emigration of the Helvetii and Boii left southern Germany and Bohemia a lightly inhabited "desert" into which Suebic peoples arrived, speaking Germanic languages, and became dominant over remaining Celtic groups.
During this time, Maroboduus of the Marcomanni established the first confederation of Germanic tribes in Bohemia.

Hermunduri

HermanduriHermunduri-Chatti War
They were able to maintain a strong alliance with neighbouring tribes including (at different times) the Lugii, Quadi, Hermunduri, Semnones, and Buri, which was sometimes partly controlled by the Roman Empire and sometimes in conflict with it; for example, in the 2nd century, they fought Marcus Aurelius.
The Hermunduri, Hermanduri, Hermunduli, Hermonduri, or Hermonduli were an ancient Germanic tribe, who occupied an area near the Elbe river, around what is now Thuringia, Bohemia, Saxony (in East Germany), and Franconia in northern Bavaria, from the first to the third century.

Czechs

CzechCzech peopleBohemian
The Czech name "Čechy" is derived from the name of the Slavic ethnic group, the Czechs, who settled in the area during the 6th or 7th century AD.
Ethnic Czechs were called Bohemians in English until the early 20th century, referring to the medieval land of Bohemia which in turn was adapted from late Iron Age tribe of Celtic Boii.

Silesia

SchlesienŚląskSilesian
Bohemia was bordered in the south by Upper and Lower Austria (both in Austria), in the west by Bavaria and in the north by Saxony and Lusatia (all in Germany), in the northeast by Silesia (in Poland), and in the east by Moravia (also part of the Czech Republic).
The first known states in Silesia were Greater Moravia and Bohemia.

White Serbia

White SerbsBoikiSerbs
Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII in his 10th century work De Administrando Imperio also mentioned the region as Boïki (see White Serbia).
913–959). According to it the "White Serbs" lived on the "other side of Turkey" (i.e. Hungary), in the area that they called "Boiki" (Bohemia).

Saxony

Free State of SaxonySaxonSachsen
Bohemia was bordered in the south by Upper and Lower Austria (both in Austria), in the west by Bavaria and in the north by Saxony and Lusatia (all in Germany), in the northeast by Silesia (in Poland), and in the east by Moravia (also part of the Czech Republic).
Eastern parts of present Saxony were ruled by Poland between 1002 and 1032 and by Bohemia since 1293.