Last three Přemyslid kings according to illumination from the Chronicon Aulae regiae: Přemysl Ottokar II (one crown – Bohemia), Wenceslaus II (two crowns – Bohemia and Poland) and Wenceslaus III (three crowns – Hungary, Bohemia and Poland)
Bohemian king Wenceslaus II as the King of Poland, a romantic drawing by Jan Matejko (1892)
The Margraviate of Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
Maximum extent of the kingdom under Ottokar II, c. 1276
Sitting of the Moravian Diet, 17th century
An 1892 map showing Bohemia proper outlined in pink, Moravia in yellow, and Austrian Silesia in orange
Premyslid Dynasty Family Tree
The Margraviate of Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
Territory under the control of the Přemyslids, c. 1301:
Kingdom of Bohemia
Kingdom of Poland
Probable extent of territory under control of Wenceslaus III in Hungary
Vassals
The former Moravian Diet building. It now houses the Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic.
The coat of arms of the Přemyslid dynasty (until 1253–1262)
The Margraviate of Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Bohemia
The unadopted coat of arms as a heraldic artwork made by Hugo Gerard Ströhl
The radical Hussites became known as Taborites, after the town of Tábor that became their center
Moravian and Austrian Silesian districts, 1897
Bohemia as the heart of Europa regina; Sebastian Münster, Basel, 1570
Judicial districts (Gerichtsbezirke) in Moravia
Bohemia (westernmost area) in Czechoslovakia 1918–1938
Linguistic map of interwar Czechoslovakia (c. 1930)
Bohemian city Karlovy Vary
A panorama of Kłodzko, the capital city of Kłodzko Land, which is referred to as "Little Prague"
Lands of the Bohemian Crown (until 1635), map by Josef Pekař, 1921

The Přemyslid dynasty or House of Přemyslid (Přemyslovci, Premysliden, Przemyślidzi) was a Bohemian royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.

- Přemyslid dynasty

Gradually they expanded, conquering much of the region of Bohemia, located in the Bohemian basin where it was not threatened by the expansion of the Frankish Empire.

- Přemyslid dynasty

The Margraviate lay east of Bohemia proper, with an area about half that region's size.

- Margraviate of Moravia

Temporarily ruled by King Bolesław I Chrobry of Poland from 999 until 1019, Moravia was re-conquered by Duke Oldřich of Bohemia and ultimately became a land of the Crown of Saint Wenceslas held by the Přemyslid dynasty.

- Margraviate of Moravia

A native monarchy arose to the throne, and Bohemia came under the rule of the Přemyslid dynasty, which would rule the Czech lands for the next several hundred years.

- Bohemia

The renewal of the old Bohemian Crown (Kingdom of Bohemia, Margraviate of Moravia, and Duchy of Upper and Lower Silesia) became the official political program of both Czech liberal politicians and the majority of Bohemian aristocracy ("state rights program"), while parties representing the German minority and small part of the aristocracy proclaimed their loyalty to the centralist Constitution (so-called "Verfassungstreue").

- Bohemia
Last three Přemyslid kings according to illumination from the Chronicon Aulae regiae: Přemysl Ottokar II (one crown – Bohemia), Wenceslaus II (two crowns – Bohemia and Poland) and Wenceslaus III (three crowns – Hungary, Bohemia and Poland)

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Kingdom of Bohemia

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Medieval and early modern monarchy in Central Europe, the predecessor of the modern Czech Republic.

Medieval and early modern monarchy in Central Europe, the predecessor of the modern Czech Republic.

The Kingdom of Bohemia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
Territories ruled by Ottokar II of Bohemia in 1273
The Kingdom of Bohemia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
The oldest depiction of coat of arms of Bohemia, castle Gozzoburg in Krems
The Kingdom of Bohemia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
Wenceslaus II as depicted in the Codex Manesse
Territories under the control of the Přemyslid dynasty around 1301
Prague Castle, the ancient seat of Bohemian dukes and kings, Roman kings and emperors, and after 1918 the office of the Czechoslovak and Czech presidents
Kutná Hora, a medieval silver-mining centre, was once the second most important town of the kingdom.
Jan Žižka, the leader of the Hussites
The Hussite wagon fort
The Bohemian Diet in 1564
Coat of arms of the Austrian province of Bohemia by Hugo Gerard Ströhl
Ströhl's unofficial artwork of the Coat of arms of the kingdom (with the Crown of Saint Wenceslas, Bohemian Crown Jewels part)
Railway network of Bohemia in 1883
Bohemia and Lands of the Bohemian Crown in 1618
Administrative divisions of Bohemia in 1712
Administrative divisions of Bohemia in 1847
Administrative divisions of Bohemia in 1893

The kings of Bohemia, besides the region of Bohemia proper itself, also ruled other lands belonging to the Bohemian Crown, which at various times included Moravia, Silesia, Lusatia, and parts of Saxony, Brandenburg, and Bavaria.

The kingdom was established by the Přemyslid dynasty in the 12th century from the Duchy of Bohemia, later ruled by the House of Luxembourg, the Jagiellonian dynasty, and from 1526 the House of Habsburg and its successor, the House of Habsburg-Lorraine.

the Margraviate of Moravia (Markrabství moravské), acquired by Přemyslid and Slavník Bohemian rulers after the 955 Battle of Lechfeld, lost in 999 to Poland and reconquered by Duke Bretislaus I in 1019/1029 (uncertain dating);

Charles IV in the Votive Panel of Jan Očko of Vlašim

Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor

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The first King of Bohemia to become Holy Roman Emperor.

The first King of Bohemia to become Holy Roman Emperor.

Charles IV in the Votive Panel of Jan Očko of Vlašim
Coat of arms of the House of Luxembourg–Bohemia
Arms of Charles IV as Holy Roman Emperor
Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Charles IV
Bust of Charles IV in St. Vitus Cathedral, 1370s
The Golden Bull of 1356
Charles's possessions at the signing of the Golden Bull of 1356.
Meeting with Charles V of France in Paris in 1378, from a fifteenth-century manuscript in the Bibliothèque de l'Arsenal
Statue of Charles IV near Charles Bridge (1848), Prague, by Ernst Julius Hähnel
100-CZK banknote
Charles and his first wife, Blanche

He was a member of the House of Luxembourg from his father's side and the Bohemian House of Přemyslid from his mother's side; he emphasized the latter due to his lifelong affinity for the Bohemian side of his inheritance, and also because his direct ancestors in the Přemyslid line included two saints.

In 1334, Charles was named Margrave of Moravia, the traditional title for heirs to the throne.

Bohemia had remained untouched by the plague.

Ottokar's royal seal

Ottokar II of Bohemia

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Ottokar's royal seal
At the peak of his power, Ottokar II's realm stretched from the Sudetes to the Adriatic Sea.
In the painting, Přemysl Otakar II: The Union of Slavic Dynasties (1924), part of Alphonse Mucha's 20-canvas work The Slav Epic, Ottokar is depicted at his niece's wedding celebration, forging alliances with other Slavic rulers in attendance.
Burial crown of Ottokar II of Bohemia at Prague Castle
Tomb of Ottokar II in St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague
Ottokar II Přemysl in a miniature from the Gelnhausen Codex
Ottokar is accepted as Duke of Austria in 1251. A painting by Jan Goth, 1936
Depiction in the Zbraslav Chronicle by Peter of Zittau, 14th century
Otacarvs II. rex, statue by Ludwig von Schwanthaler (1847) placed at the National Museum in Prague (symbol of keep at his right foot is reminiscent of the many castles and towns, which he founded)

Ottokar II (Přemysl Otakar II.; c. 1233, in Městec Králové, Bohemia – 26 August 1278, in Dürnkrut, Lower Austria), the Iron and Golden King, was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty who reigned as King of Bohemia from 1253 until his death in 1278.

He also held the titles of Margrave of Moravia from 1247, Duke of Austria from 1251, and Duke of Styria from 1260, as well as Duke of Carinthia and landgrave of Carniola from 1269.

Moravia

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Rolling hills of the Králický Sněžník massif, Horní Morava, near the border with Bohemia
Šance Dam on the Ostravice River in the Moravian-Silesian Beskids; the river forms the border with Silesia.
Steppe landscape near Mohelno
Venus of Vestonice, the oldest surviving ceramic figurine in the world
Pálava mountains with Věstonice Reservoir, area of palaeolithic settlement
Territory of Great Moravia in the 9th century: area ruled by Rastislav (846–870) map marks the greatest territorial extent during the reign of Svatopluk I (871–894), violet core is origin of Moravia.
Saint Wenceslas Cathedral in Olomouc, seat of bishops of Olomouc since the 10th century and the current seat of the Archbishopric of Olomouc, the Metropolitan archdiocese of Moravia
Moravian nationality, as declared by people in the 1991 census
Moravian Slovak costumes (worn by men and women) during the Jízda králů ("Ride of the Kings") Festival held annually in the village of Vlčnov (southeastern Moravia)
Old ethnic division of Moravians according to an encyclopaedia of 1878
Lednice Castle
Punkevní Cave in the Moravian Karst
Bohemia and Moravia in the 12th century
Church of St. Thomas in Brno, mausoleum of Moravian branch House of Luxembourg, rulers of Moravia; and the old governor's palace, a former Augustinian abbey
12th century Romanesque St. Procopius Basilica in Třebíč
The Moravian banner of arms, which first appeared in the medieval era<ref>{{cite conference|first1 = Zbyšek|last1 = Svoboda|first2 = Pavel|last2 = Fojtík|first3 = Petr|last3 = Exner|first4 = Jaroslav|last4 = Martykán|title = Odborné vexilologické stanovisko k moravské vlajce|book-title = Vexilologie. Zpravodaj České vexilologické společnosti, o.s. č. 169|pages = 3319, 3320|publisher = Česká vexilologická společnost|date = 2013|location = Brno|url = http://www.moravska-vlajka.eu/dokumenty/vexilologie-169.pdf}}</ref><ref>{{cite conference|first = František|last = Pícha|title = Znaky a prapory v kronice Ottokara Štýrského|book-title = Vexilologie. Zpravodaj České vexilologické společnosti, o.s. č. 169|pages = 3320–3324|publisher = Česká vexilologická společnost|date = 2013|location = Brno|url = http://www.moravska-vlajka.eu/dokumenty/vexilologie-169.pdf}}</ref>
Habsburg Empire Crown lands: growth of the Habsburg territories and Moravia's status
Administrative division of Moravia as crown land of Austria in 1893
Jan Černý, president of Moravia in 1922–1926, later also Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia
A general map of Moravia in the 1920s
In 1928, Moravia was merged into Moravia-Silesia, one of four lands of Czechoslovakia, together with Bohemia, Slovakia and Subcarpathian Rus.
The Tatra 77 (1934)
WIKOV Supersport (1931)
Thonet No. 14 chair
The speed train Tatra M 290.0 Slovenská strela 1936
Zlín XIII aircraft on display at the National Technical Museum in Prague
Zetor 25A tractor
Comenius
Gregor Mendel
František Palacký
Jaromír Mundy
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk
Leoš Janáček
Sigmund Freud
Edmund Husserl
Alphonse Mucha
Adolf Loos
Tomáš Baťa
Kurt Gödel
Emil Zátopek
Milan Kundera
Ivan Lendl
Electron microscope Brno
Aeroplane L 410 NG by Let Kunovice
Precise rifle scope by MeOpta
The (modern) BREN gun M 2 11
The modern street car EVO 2
Diesel railway coach class Bfhpvee295

Moravia (, also , ; Morava ; Mähren ; Morawy ; ; Moravia) is a historical region in the east of the Czech Republic and one of three historical Czech lands, with Bohemia and Czech Silesia.

The medieval and early modern Margraviate of Moravia was a crown land of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown from 1348 to 1918, an imperial state of the Holy Roman Empire from 1004 to 1806, a crown land of the Austrian Empire from 1804 to 1867, and a part of Austria-Hungary from 1867 to 1918.

Following the defeat of the Magyars by Emperor Otto I at the Battle of Lechfeld in 955, Otto's ally Boleslaus I, the Přemyslid ruler of Bohemia, took control over Moravia.