Bolesław III Wrymouth

Boleslaus IIIBolesław IIIBoleslaw III of PolandBoleslaw KrzywoustyBoleslaus III of PolandBolesław III KrzywoustyBolesław KrzywoustyBolesław III of PolandBoleslaw III WrymouthBoleslaus III the Wrymouth
Bolesław III Wrymouth (also known as Boleslaus III the Wry-mouthed, Bolesław III Krzywousty) (20 August 1086 – 28 October 1138), was a Duke of Lesser Poland, Silesia and Sandomierz between 1102 and 1107 and over the whole Poland between 1107 and 1138.wikipedia
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Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
Bolesław III Wrymouth (also known as Boleslaus III the Wry-mouthed, Bolesław III Krzywousty) (20 August 1086 – 28 October 1138), was a Duke of Lesser Poland, Silesia and Sandomierz between 1102 and 1107 and over the whole Poland between 1107 and 1138.
In 1109, Prince Bolesław III Wrymouth defeated the King of Germany Henry V at the Battle of Hundsfeld, stopping the German advance into Poland.

Zbigniew of Poland

Zbigniew
Backed by their father, Boleslaw and his half-brother Zbigniew finally expelled Sieciech from the country in 1101, after several years of fighting.
Zbigniew was considered illegitimate, and after the birth of his half-brother Bolesław was destined for the Church.

Salomea of Berg

SalomeaSalome of BergSalome von Berg
After her death, Bolesław married to a German noblewoman, Salomea of Berg, which in some way was the cause of changes in Polish foreign policy: in the second half of his rule, the Prince sought to restore diplomatic relations with his western neighbor.
1099/1101 – 27 July 1144) was a German noblewoman and, by marriage with Prince Bolesław III Wrymouth in 1115, High Duchess of Poland until her husband's death in 1138.

Testament of Bolesław III Wrymouth

Testament of Bolesław III Krzywoustytestamentfragmentation of Poland
His last, and perhaps the most momentous act, was his will and testament known as "The Succession Statute" in which he divided the country among his sons, leading to almost 200 years of feudal fragmentation of the Polish Kingdom.
]]The last will and testament of the Piast duke Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland, established rules for governance of the Polish kingdom by his four surviving sons after his death.

Lesser Poland

MałopolskaLesser PolishEast Małopolska
Bolesław III Wrymouth (also known as Boleslaus III the Wry-mouthed, Bolesław III Krzywousty) (20 August 1086 – 28 October 1138), was a Duke of Lesser Poland, Silesia and Sandomierz between 1102 and 1107 and over the whole Poland between 1107 and 1138. Bolesław's territory included Lesser Poland, Silesia and Lubusz Land.

Sandomierz

SandomirDuke of SandomierzSandomierski
Bolesław III Wrymouth (also known as Boleslaus III the Wry-mouthed, Bolesław III Krzywousty) (20 August 1086 – 28 October 1138), was a Duke of Lesser Poland, Silesia and Sandomierz between 1102 and 1107 and over the whole Poland between 1107 and 1138. Władysław also retained control of the most important cities i.e. Wrocław, Kraków and Sandomierz.
The testament (ca 1115-1118) of Bolesław III Wrymouth, in which he divided Poland among his sons, designated Sandomierz as the capital of one of the resulting principalities, the Duchy of Sandomierz.

Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor

Henry VEmperor Henry VHeinrich V
Bolesław sought to gain Pomerania which caused an armed conflict between the brothers, and forced Zbigniew to flee the country and seek military help from German King Henry V.
An attack by Boleslaus III of Poland and Borivoi on Svatopluk forced Henry to give up his campaign.

Christianization of Pomerania

Conversion of Pomeraniabecame ChristianChristianized
Integration of the newly annexed lands enabled Bolesław to build churches and began the process of converting Pomerania.
Another attempt was made following the subjugation of Pomerania by Boleslaw III of Poland.

Płock

PlockPłock, PolandPlock, Poland
In 1974, in the Masovian Blessed Virgin Mary Cathedral of Płock, where according to tradition Bolesław was buried, an archaeological research project was conducted.
From 1079 to 1138, during the reign of the Polish monarchs Władysław I Herman and Bolesław III Wrymouth, the city was the capital of Poland, then earning its title as the Ducal Capital City of Płock (Stołeczne Książęce Miasto Płock).

Skarbimir

SkarbmirSkarbimir (Skarbek)
This took place at a popular assembly or Wiec organized in Wrocław by a magnate named Skarbimir of the Awdaniec family.
Skarbimir of the Clan Awdaniec (died before 1132) was a Medieval Polish magnate, tutor, advisor and count palatine of Polish monarch Bolesław III Wrymouth.

Wrocław

BreslauWroclawBreslau (Wrocław)
This took place at a popular assembly or Wiec organized in Wrocław by a magnate named Skarbimir of the Awdaniec family. Władysław also retained control of the most important cities i.e. Wrocław, Kraków and Sandomierz. The military operations mainly taken place in southwestern Poland, in Silesia, where Henry V's army laid siege to major strongholds of Głogów, Wrocław and Bytom Odrzański.
In 1109 during the Polish-German war, Prince Bolesław III Wrymouth defeated the King of Germany Henry V at the Battle of Hundsfeld, stopping the German advance into Poland.

Lubusz Land

LubuszLand Lebushills of Lebus
Bolesław's territory included Lesser Poland, Silesia and Lubusz Land.
In 1125 Duke Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland established the Bishopric of Lebus to secure Lubusz Land.

Kalisz

Kalisch36 – KaliszKaliskie
The allied forces of Bolesław easily took control of most important cities including Kalisz, Gniezno, Spycimierz and Łęczyca, in effect taking half of Zbigniew's lands.
In 1106 Bolesław III Wrymouth captured the town and made it a part of his feudal domain.

Płock Cathedral

Masovian Blessed Virgin Mary CathedralCathedral of PłockPlock Cathedral
In 1974, in the Masovian Blessed Virgin Mary Cathedral of Płock, where according to tradition Bolesław was buried, an archaeological research project was conducted.
In the Royal Chapel on the north side of the cathedral is a marble sarcophagus forming the tomb of two Polish rulers, Władysław I Herman and his son Bolesław III Wrymouth.

Białogard

BelgardBialogardLordship of Belgard
In Autumn of 1102 Bolesław organized a war party into Pomerania during which his forces sacked Białogard.
This city was conquered by Boleslaus III of Poland in 1107.

Soběslav I, Duke of Bohemia

Soběslav ISoběslav I of BohemiaSoběslav
His intention was to install yet another pretender on the Czech throne, Soběslav I, who sought refuge in Poland.
Soběslav is first documented about 1107, when he and his elder brother Duke Bořivoj II were expelled by their Přemyslid relative Svatopluk of Olomouc and fled to the court of their maternal cousin Duke Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland.

Racibórz

RatiborRaciborzRatibor (Racibórz)
This expedition was prompted by the invasion of the German-Bohemian coalition to Hungary (siege to Pozsony Castle) and the fact that Svatopluk, who owed Bolesław his throne, didn't honor his promise in which he returned Silesian cities seized from Poland (Racibórz, Kamieniec, Koźle among others) by his predecessors.
However, the first confirmed mention of Racibórz was made in 1108 in the Gesta principum Polonorum chronicle by the Benedictine monk Gallus Anonymus, at a time when the Polish duke Bolesław III Wrymouth had to ward off the attacks by the forces of Duke Svatopluk of Bohemia invading from the Moravian lands in the south.

Głogów

GlogauGlogówGroß-Glogau
Before the fight ended in Pomerania, the German troops have been able to approach Głogów.
In 1109, King Henry V of Germany, entangled in the fratricidal war between the Piast dukes Bolesław III Wrymouth and Zbigniew besieged the town, but could not overcome the Polish forces in the Battle of Głogów.

Kołobrzeg

KolbergKolobrzegColberg
In order to paralyze the alliance of Pomerania and his older brother, Bolesław carried out multiple attacks on northern land in 1103 (the battle of Kołobrzeg, where was defeated ), and in 1104–05, ended with success.
During his campaigns in the early 12th century, Bolesław III Wrymouth reacquired Pomerania for Poland, and made the local "Griffin" dynasty his vassals.

Bytom Odrzański

BytomBeuthen an der OderBeuthen an der Oder (Bytom Odrzański)
The military operations mainly taken place in southwestern Poland, in Silesia, where Henry V's army laid siege to major strongholds of Głogów, Wrocław and Bytom Odrzański.
During the invasion of Poland by Henry V, Polish ruler Bolesław III Wrymouth successfully defended the settlement in August 1109.

Judith of Swabia

JudithJudith MariaJudith-Maria
The chosen bride was Judith-Maria, daughter of Emperor Henry III and widow of King Solomon of Hungary, who after her wedding took the name Sophia in order to distinguish herself from Władysław I Herman's first wife.
If this parentage is correct, Judith was the great-grandmother of Salomea of Berg, second wife of Bolesław III Wrymouth (her later stepson).

Battle of Hundsfeld

Psie PoleBattle of Psie Pole
He reportedly defeated the expedition at the Battle of Hundsfeld on 24 August 1109, although the existence of this battle is doubted by historians because it was first recorded about a century later.
The Battle of Hundsfeld or Battle of Psie Pole was allegedly fought on 24 August 1109 near the Silesian capital Wrocław between the Holy Roman Empire in aid of the claims of the exiled Piast duke Zbigniew against his ruling half-brother, Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland.

Otto of Bamberg

OttoBishop Otto of BambergOtto I
Bishop Otto of Bamberg confirmed the Christianization of Pomerania from 1123 onward.
Otto was sent on his first mission by the Polish duke Bolesław III Wrymouth in 1124.

Nakło nad Notecią

NakłoNakelNaklo
The fortified border cities included: Santok, Wieleń, Nakło, Czarnków, Ujście and Wyszogród.
Between 1109 and 1113 it fell to Duke Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland.

Sieciechów, Masovian Voivodeship

SieciechówSieciechowCastrum Sethei
The rebel forces were then further directed towards Sieciechów, where the Palatine took refuge.
In 1132 the Sieciechów Castle became the property of High Prince Bolesław Krzywousty and became the seat of castellans.