Bolometric correction

bolometric
In astronomy, the bolometric correction is the correction made to the absolute magnitude of an object in order to convert its visible magnitude to its bolometric magnitude.wikipedia
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Luminosity

luminousbolometric luminosityluminosities
IAU 2015 Resolution B2 proposed an absolute bolometric magnitude scale where corresponds to luminosity 3.0128 W, with the zero point luminosity chosen such that the Sun (with nominal luminosity 3.828 W) corresponds to absolute bolometric magnitude.
Bolometric luminosities can also be calculated using a bolometric correction to a luminosity in a particular passband.

Absolute magnitude

Hbolometric magnitudeabsolute magnitude (H)
IAU 2015 Resolution B2 proposed an absolute bolometric magnitude scale where corresponds to luminosity 3.0128 W, with the zero point luminosity chosen such that the Sun (with nominal luminosity 3.828 W) corresponds to absolute bolometric magnitude. In astronomy, the bolometric correction is the correction made to the absolute magnitude of an object in order to convert its visible magnitude to its bolometric magnitude. The bolometric correction scale is set by the absolute magnitude of the Sun and an adopted (arbitrary) absolute bolometric magnitude for the Sun. Placing a radiation source (e.g. star) at the standard distance of 10 parsecs, it follows that the zero point of the apparent bolometric magnitude scale corresponds to irradiance, where the nominal total solar irradiance measured at 1 astronomical unit (1361 W/m 2 ) corresponds to an apparent bolometric magnitude of the Sun of.
To convert from an absolute magnitude in a specific filter band to absolute bolometric magnitude, a bolometric correction (BC) is applied.

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
In astronomy, the bolometric correction is the correction made to the absolute magnitude of an object in order to convert its visible magnitude to its bolometric magnitude.

Magnitude (astronomy)

magnitudemagnitudesmag
In astronomy, the bolometric correction is the correction made to the absolute magnitude of an object in order to convert its visible magnitude to its bolometric magnitude.

Apparent magnitude

apparent visual magnitudemagnitudevisual magnitude
In astronomy, the bolometric correction is the correction made to the absolute magnitude of an object in order to convert its visible magnitude to its bolometric magnitude.

Sun

solarSolThe Sun
The bolometric correction scale is set by the absolute magnitude of the Sun and an adopted (arbitrary) absolute bolometric magnitude for the Sun. Placing a radiation source (e.g. star) at the standard distance of 10 parsecs, it follows that the zero point of the apparent bolometric magnitude scale corresponds to irradiance, where the nominal total solar irradiance measured at 1 astronomical unit (1361 W/m 2 ) corresponds to an apparent bolometric magnitude of the Sun of.

International Astronomical Union

IAUWorking Group for Planetary System NomenclatureInternational Astronomical Union (IAU)
IAU 2015 Resolution B2 proposed an absolute bolometric magnitude scale where corresponds to luminosity 3.0128 W, with the zero point luminosity chosen such that the Sun (with nominal luminosity 3.828 W) corresponds to absolute bolometric magnitude. The XXIXth International Astronomical Union (IAU) General Assembly in Honolulu adopted in August 2015 Resolution B2 on recommended zero points for the absolute and apparent bolometric magnitude scales.

Radiation

radiologicalradioactiveradiative
Placing a radiation source (e.g. star) at the standard distance of 10 parsecs, it follows that the zero point of the apparent bolometric magnitude scale corresponds to irradiance, where the nominal total solar irradiance measured at 1 astronomical unit (1361 W/m 2 ) corresponds to an apparent bolometric magnitude of the Sun of.

Parsec

Mpcpckpc
Placing a radiation source (e.g. star) at the standard distance of 10 parsecs, it follows that the zero point of the apparent bolometric magnitude scale corresponds to irradiance, where the nominal total solar irradiance measured at 1 astronomical unit (1361 W/m 2 ) corresponds to an apparent bolometric magnitude of the Sun of.

Irradiance

intensitylight intensityspectral irradiance
Placing a radiation source (e.g. star) at the standard distance of 10 parsecs, it follows that the zero point of the apparent bolometric magnitude scale corresponds to irradiance, where the nominal total solar irradiance measured at 1 astronomical unit (1361 W/m 2 ) corresponds to an apparent bolometric magnitude of the Sun of.

Solar irradiance

solar radiationinsolationsolar insolation
Placing a radiation source (e.g. star) at the standard distance of 10 parsecs, it follows that the zero point of the apparent bolometric magnitude scale corresponds to irradiance, where the nominal total solar irradiance measured at 1 astronomical unit (1361 W/m 2 ) corresponds to an apparent bolometric magnitude of the Sun of.

Astronomical unit

AUastronomical unitsAUs
Placing a radiation source (e.g. star) at the standard distance of 10 parsecs, it follows that the zero point of the apparent bolometric magnitude scale corresponds to irradiance, where the nominal total solar irradiance measured at 1 astronomical unit (1361 W/m 2 ) corresponds to an apparent bolometric magnitude of the Sun of.

Zeta Puppis

ζ PuppisNaosζ Pup
Visually it is over 10,000 times brighter than the Sun, but its high temperature means that most of its radiation is in the ultraviolet and its bolometric luminosity is over 500,000 times that of the Sun.

Arcturus

ArcturiansArcturianAlpha Boo
It is about 110 times brighter than the Sun in visible light wavelengths, but this underestimates its strength as much of the light it gives off is in the infrared; total (bolometric) power output is about 180 times that of the Sun.

DY Centauri

As consequence, its visual apparent magnitude has faded from about 11.75 in the beginning of the 20th century to 13.2 in 2010 (due to changes in the bolometric correction), while its radius is calculated to have decreased from to.

Supergiant star

supergiantsupergiantsluminous supergiant
This bolometric correction is approximately one magnitude for mid B, late K, and early M stars, increasing to three magnitudes (a factor of 15) for O and mid M stars.

Hertzsprung–Russell diagram

Hertzsprung-Russell diagramHR diagramcolor-magnitude diagram
When converting luminosity or absolute bolometric magnitude to apparent or absolute visual magnitude, one requires a bolometric correction, which may or may not come from the same source as the color–temperature relation.

AB8 (star)

AB8SMC AB8AB8A
A more common method is to measure the visual luminosity and apply a bolometric correction to give the total luminosity at all wavelengths, although the size of the bolometric correction is extremely sensitive to the effective temperature.

Capella

AlhaiotAlpha Aurigaealpha Aurigae (Capella)
Their bolometric luminosities are most accurately derived from their apparent magnitudes and bolometric corrections, but are confirmed by calculation from the temperatures and radii of the stars.

R136a1

The extreme temperature of the star causes its peak radiation to be around 50 nm and nearly 99% of the radiation to be emitted outside the visual range (a bolometric correction around −5).

AB7

A more common method is to measure the visual luminosity and apply a bolometric correction to give the total luminosity at all wavelengths, although the size of the bolometric correction is extremely sensitive to the effective temperature.