Bolzano

BozenBolzano, ItalyBolzano-BozenBolzano/BozenBozen/BolzanoGriesBotzenGries-San QuirinoBozen (Bolzano)Bauzanum
Bolzano ( or ; Bozen (formerly Botzen), ; Bozn; or Bulsan) is the capital city of the province of South Tyrol in northern Italy.wikipedia
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South Tyrol

TyrolProvince of BolzanoSouth Tyrolean
Bolzano ( or ; Bozen (formerly Botzen), ; Bozn; or Bulsan) is the capital city of the province of South Tyrol in northern Italy. With a population of 107,436, Bolzano is also by far the largest city in South Tyrol and the third largest in Tyrol.
Its capital and largest city is Bolzano (German: Bozen; Ladin: Balsan or Bulsan).

Tyrol

TirolTyroleanTyrolia
With a population of 107,436, Bolzano is also by far the largest city in South Tyrol and the third largest in Tyrol.
The largest cities in Tyrol are Innsbruck, Trento and Bolzano.

Free University of Bozen-Bolzano

Free University of BolzanoBolzanoFree University Bolzano
Bolzano is the seat of the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, where lectures and seminars are held in English, German, and Italian.
The Free University of Bozen-Bolzano (Italian: Libera Università di Bolzano, German: Freie Universität Bozen, Ladin: Università Liedia de Bulsan) is a university primarily located in Bolzano, Italy.

Brenner Pass

BrennerBrenneroBrenner Route
In the Middle Ages, the two main Alpine crossings, the Via Claudia Augusta over Reschenpass and the Brenner route over Brenner Pass, met in Bolzano.
The central section of the Brenner Pass covers a four-lane motorway and railway tracks connecting Bozen/Bolzano in the south and Innsbruck to the north.

Via Claudia Augusta

Via ClaudiaClaudiaClaudia Augusta Imperial Road
In the Middle Ages, the two main Alpine crossings, the Via Claudia Augusta over Reschenpass and the Brenner route over Brenner Pass, met in Bolzano.
People and goods could pass between the Adriatic and the broad valley of the Po to Tridentum (modern Trento), then northward following the Adige River up to Pons Drusi, the "bridge of Drusus" which developed into Bolzano.

Sarntal

SarentinoSarntheinSarnthein, Northern Italy
The city is located in the basin where the Sarntal, Eisacktal, and the val Adige with their rivers, Talfer, Eisack, and Etsch Adige, meet.
Sarntal (Sarentino ) is a valley and a comune (municipality) in South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 15 km north of the city of Bolzano.

Eppan an der Weinstraße

EppanAppianoCornaiano
Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
Eppan an der Weinstraße (Appiano sulla Strada del Vino ), often abbreviated to Eppan or Appiano, is a comune (municipality) in South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 8 km southwest of the city of Bolzano.

Deutschnofen

Nova Ponente
Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
Deutschnofen (Italian: Nova Ponente ) is a comune (municipality) in the province of South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 30 km southeast of the city of Bolzano.

Terlan

SiebeneichTerlano
Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
The municipal area is situated within the Adige Valley, about 9 km northwest of the city of Bolzano.

History of Tyrol

TyrolTirolTyrol region
German populations have been present in the region of Tyrol from that period onwards.
In 553, southern Tyrol was incorporated into the Lombards' Kingdom of Italy, northern Tyrol came under the influence of the Bavarii, and western Tyrol became part of Alamannia—the three areas meeting at present-day Bolzano.

Comando Truppe Alpine

4th Alpine Army Corps4th Army CorpsIV Army Corps
The city is also home to the Italian Army's Alpini High Command (COMALP) and some of its combat and support units.
The corps consisted of the 9th Infantry Division Pasubio in Verona and the 11th Infantry Division Brennero in Bolzano.

Italian Army

ArmyEsercito ItalianoItalian
The city is also home to the Italian Army's Alpini High Command (COMALP) and some of its combat and support units.
On 1 May 1952 the army activated one army command and two corps commands, the Third Army in Padua, and the IV Army Corps in Bolzano and V Army Corps in Vittorio Veneto, to be able to circumvent NATO's chain of command in case a war should break out between Italy and Yugoslavia for the Free Territory of Trieste.

Vadena

Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
Vadena (Pfatten ) is a comune (municipality) in South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 10 km southwest of the city of Bolzano.

Jenesien

San Genesio Atesino
Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
Jenesien (San Genesio Atesino ) is a comune (municipality) in the province of South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 4 km northwest of the city of Bolzano.

Eisacktal

EisackEisack ValleyEisack/Isarco
The city is located in the basin where the Sarntal, Eisacktal, and the val Adige with their rivers, Talfer, Eisack, and Etsch Adige, meet.
The valley of the Eisack river stretches from Brenner Pass southwards down to its confluence with the Adige near Bolzano.

Karneid

Cornedo all'IsarcoGummer
Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
Karneid (Cornedo all'Isarco ) is a comune (municipality) in South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 4 km east of the city of Bolzano.

Ritten

CollalboRenonKlobenstein–Collalbo
Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
Ritten borders the following municipalities: Barbian, Bolzano, Kastelruth, Karneid, Völs, Jenesien, Sarntal and Villanders.

Eisack

IsarcoEisack RiverIsarcus
The city is located in the basin where the Sarntal, Eisacktal, and the val Adige with their rivers, Talfer, Eisack, and Etsch Adige, meet.
After about 96 km, it joins the Adige river south of Bolzano.

Laives

Leifers
Neighbouring communities are: Eppan, Karneid, Laives, Deutschnofen, Ritten, Jenesien, Terlan and Vadena.
Laives (Leifers ) is a town and a comune (municipality) in South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 8 km south of the city of Bolzano.

Bolzano Transit Camp

BolzanoBolzano campBolzano concentration camp
During the Second World War, Bolzano was the site of the Nazi's Bolzano Transit Camp, a concentration camp for persecuted Jews and political prisoners.
The Bolzano transit camp (Polizei- und Durchgangslager Bozen) was a Nazi concentration camp active in Bolzano between 1944 and the end of the Second World War.

Trento

TrentTridentumTrento, Italy
The nearest big cities are 58 km (Trento) and 118 km (Innsbruck) away.
The origins of this city on the river track to Bolzano and the low Alpine passes of Brenner and the Reschen Pass over the Alps are disputed.

Prince-Bishopric of Trent

Bishopric of TrentTrentBishop of Trent
In 1027 the area of Bolzano and the rest of the diocese was conferred, by the emperor Conrad II from the Salian dynasty, upon the bishops of Trent.
The princes of Trento maintained a strong allegiance to the Emperor, even when the latter was excommunicated: this because they need his protection against the growing power of subjects like the counts of Tyrol, who controlled the area around Bozen, those of Eppan, and others.

County of Tyrol

TyrolTyroleanTirol
In 1277 Bolzano was conquered by Meinhard II, the Count of Tyrol, leading to a struggle between the Counts of Tyrol and the bishops of Trent.
In 1027 Henry's Salian successor, Emperor Conrad II granted the Trent bishops further estates around Bozen and in the Vinschgau region; at the same time he vested the Bishop of Brixen with the suzerainty in the Etschtal and Inntal, part of the German stem duchy of Bavaria under the rule of Conrad's son Henry III.

Alto Adige

South Tyrol
After the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, Bolzano became briefly part of the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy and was incorporated into the Dipartimento Alto Adige of the French Alto Adige ("Haute Adige").
In Italian, the name "Alto Adige" is used in the full name of the "Provincia autonoma di Bolzano – Alto Adige", while usually the name "Alto Adige" on its own is used for the alpine region around Bolzano (since academic Ettore Tolomei made it official in Italy after the Great War).

Adige

Adige RiverAdige ValleyEtsch
The city is located in the basin where the Sarntal, Eisacktal, and the val Adige with their rivers, Talfer, Eisack, and Etsch Adige, meet.
The section between Merano and Bolzano, is called Etschtal, meaning Adige Valley.