Bone marrow

marrowred bone marrowbone marrow stromayellow bone marrowbone marrow cellsbone-marrowmarrow bonesmedullabeef marrowbone
Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bones.wikipedia
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Haematopoiesis

hematopoietichematopoiesishaematopoietic
In birds and mammals, bone marrow is the primary site of new blood cell production or hematopoiesis.
Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the medulla of the bone (bone marrow) and have the unique ability to give rise to all of the different mature blood cell types and tissues.

Bone

cortical bonebone tissuecancellous bone
Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bones.
Other types of tissue found in bones include bone marrow, endosteum, periosteum, nerves, blood vessels and cartilage.

Myeloid tissue

myeloidmyeloid lineagemyelogenous
All types of hematopoietic cells, including both myeloid and lymphoid lineages, are created in bone marrow; however, lymphoid cells must migrate to other lymphoid organs (e.g. thymus) in order to complete maturation.
Myeloid tissue, in the bone marrow sense of the word myeloid (myelo- + -oid), is tissue of bone marrow, of bone marrow cell lineage, or resembling bone marrow, and myelogenous tissue (myelo- + -genous) is any tissue of, or arising from, bone marrow; in these senses the terms are usually used synonymously, as for example with chronic myeloid/myelogenous leukemia.

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

bone marrow transplantbone marrow transplantationstem cell transplant
Bone marrow transplants can be conducted to treat severe diseases of the bone marrow, including certain forms of cancer such as leukemia.
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the transplantation of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, usually derived from bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood.

Leukemia

leukaemialeukemiasleukemic
Bone marrow transplants can be conducted to treat severe diseases of the bone marrow, including certain forms of cancer such as leukemia.
Leukemia, also spelled leukaemia, is a group of blood cancers that usually begin in the bone marrow and result in high numbers of abnormal blood cells.

Medullary cavity

medullary boneintramedullarymedullary
Human marrow produces approximately 500 billion blood cells per day, which join the systemic circulation via permeable vasculature sinusoids within the medullary cavity.
The medullary cavity (medulla, innermost part) is the central cavity of bone shafts where red bone marrow and/or yellow bone marrow (adipose tissue) is stored; hence, the medullary cavity is also known as the marrow cavity.

Lymphatic system

lymphoidlymphoid tissuelymphatic
All types of hematopoietic cells, including both myeloid and lymphoid lineages, are created in bone marrow; however, lymphoid cells must migrate to other lymphoid organs (e.g. thymus) in order to complete maturation.
The system also includes all the structures dedicated to the circulation and production of lymphocytes (the primary cellular component of lymph), which also includes the bone marrow, and the lymphoid tissue associated with the digestive system.

White blood cell

leukocyteleukocyteswhite blood cells
Marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells which give rise to the three classes of blood cells that are found in circulation: white blood cells (leukocytes), red blood cells (erythrocytes), and platelets (thrombocytes).
All white blood cells are produced and derived from multipotent cells in the bone marrow known as hematopoietic stem cells.

Myeloblast

myeloblastsgranulocyte precursor cellsblast
It is found in the bone marrow.

Myelopoiesis

myeloidmyeloid lineage cellMyelopoietic
In hematology, myelopoiesis in the broadest sense of the term is the production of bone marrow and of all cells that arise from it, namely, all blood cells.

Neutrophil

neutrophilsneutrophil granulocyteneutrophilic
They are formed from stem cells in the bone marrow and differentiated into subpopulations of neutrophil-killers and neutrophil-cagers.

Blood cell

blood cellshematopoietic cellhemocyte
It is composed of hematopoietic cells, marrow adipose tissue, and supportive stromal cells.
They are produced and derived from multipotent cells in the bone marrow known as a hematopoietic stem cells.

Eosinophil

eosinophilseosinophil granulocyteEosino
They are granulocytes that develop during hematopoiesis in the bone marrow before migrating into blood, after which they are terminally differentiated and do not multiply.

Plasma cell

plasma cellsplasma B cellplasmablast
Plasma cells, also called plasma B cells, are white blood cells that originate in the bone marrow and secrete large quantities of proteins called antibodies in response to being presented specific substances called antigens.

Megakaryocyte

megakaryocytesmegakaryocyticMegakaryocytopoiesis
A megakaryocyte (mega- + karyo- + -cyte, "large-nucleus cell") is a large bone marrow cell with a lobated nucleus responsible for the production of blood thrombocytes (platelets), which are necessary for normal blood clotting.

Mast cell

mast cellsanaphylactic degranulationMast cell disease
Furthermore, they share a common precursor in bone marrow expressing the CD34 molecule.

Sternum

manubriumbreastbonesternal
In adult humans, bone marrow is primarily located in the ribs, vertebrae, sternum, and bones of the pelvis. In adults, red marrow is found mainly in the central skeleton, such as the pelvis, sternum, cranium, ribs, vertebrae and scapulae, and variably found in the proximal epiphyseal ends of long bones such as the femur and humerus.
Because the sternum contains bone marrow, it is sometimes used as a site for bone marrow biopsy.

Erythropoiesis

erythropoieticerythropoeisisproduction of red blood cells
In postnatal birds and mammals (including humans), this usually occurs within the red bone marrow.

Epiphysis

epiphysessubchondral boneepiphyseal
In adults, red marrow is found mainly in the central skeleton, such as the pelvis, sternum, cranium, ribs, vertebrae and scapulae, and variably found in the proximal epiphyseal ends of long bones such as the femur and humerus.
The epiphysis is filled with red bone marrow, which produces erythrocytes (red blood cells).

Endothelial stem cell

endothelialendothelial stem cells
Endothelial stem cells (ESCs) are one of three types of stem cells found in bone marrow.

Stem cell

stem cellsstem cell researchstem-cell research
Additionally, bone marrow stem cells have been successfully transformed into functional neural cells, and can also potentially be used to treat illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease.
bone marrow, adipose tissue, and blood.

Stromal cell

stromalstromal cellsstroma
Stromal cells are connective tissue cells of any organ, for example in the uterine mucosa (endometrium), prostate, bone marrow, lymph node and the ovary.

Basophil

basophilsbasophil granulocytebasophilic
Basophils arise and mature in bone marrow.

Nucleated red blood cell

erythroblasterythroblastsNormoblast
Thus, if NRBCs are seen on an adult's peripheral blood smear, it suggests that there is a very high demand for the bone marrow to produce RBCs, and immature RBCs are being released into circulation.

Mesenchymal stem cell

mesenchymal stem cellsmesenchymal cellmesenchymal
The bone marrow stroma contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), also known as marrow stromal cells.