Bonifacius

Count BonifaceBonifatiusBonifaceBoniface, Count of AfricaSankt Bonifatius
Comes Bonifatius (anglicized as Count Boniface) (d. 432) was a Roman general and governor of the Diocese of Africa.wikipedia
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Flavius Aetius

AetiusAëtiusEzio
An ally of Galla Placidia (regent of Valentinian III), Bonifacius engaged in Roman civil wars on her behalf against the generals Flavius Felix in 427-429 and Flavius Aetius in 432.
Later he married Pelagia, widow of Bonifacius, from whom he had a son, Gaudentius.

Sebastianus (magister militum)

Sebastianus
Although he defeated the latter at the Battle of Rimini, Bonifacius suffered a fatal wound and was succeeded by his son-in-law Sebastianus as patricius of the Western Roman Empire.
Sebastianus (died before 445 or in 450) was a general of the Western Roman Empire, son-in-law of Bonifacius.

Valentinian III

ValentinianEmperor Valentinian IIIPlacidus Valentinianus Caesar
An ally of Galla Placidia (regent of Valentinian III), Bonifacius engaged in Roman civil wars on her behalf against the generals Flavius Felix in 427-429 and Flavius Aetius in 432.
In addition, the initial period of Valentinian's reign was dominated by the struggle among the leaders of the three principal army groups of the west – Flavius Felix, the senior Magister militum praesentalis, Bonifacius, the Magister militum per Africam and Flavius Aëtius, the Magister militum per Gallias.

Felix (consul 428)

Flavius FelixFelixFlavius Constantius Felix
An ally of Galla Placidia (regent of Valentinian III), Bonifacius engaged in Roman civil wars on her behalf against the generals Flavius Felix in 427-429 and Flavius Aetius in 432. Bonifatius was accused of attempting to form his own empire in Roman Africa at the allegation of Flavius Constantius Felix, who had also been a staunch supporter of Placidia and had been installed as the magister utriusque militiae of the west by Theodosius II. Placidia ordered Felix to send an army to restore the vital province in response.
Between 425 (year in which he was made patricius) and 429 he served as magister utriusque militae in defense of Italy, but despite a brief mention of one of his military actions in the Notitia Dignitatum, his subordinates Bonifacius and Flavius Aetius were considered more significant in this regard.

Battle of Rimini (432)

Battle of RavennaBattle of RiminiCivil war
Although he defeated the latter at the Battle of Rimini, Bonifacius suffered a fatal wound and was succeeded by his son-in-law Sebastianus as patricius of the Western Roman Empire.
The Battle of Rimini was fought in 432 between the two strong men of the Western Roman Empire, the very recently deposed Magister Utriusque Militiae Flavius Aetius and the newly appointed Magister Utriusque Militiae Bonifatius (Bonifacius or Boniface).

Vandals

VandalVandalicVandal Kingdom
He campaigned against the Visigoths in Roman Gaul and the Vandals in Roman North Africa.
According to Procopius, the Vandals came to Africa at the request of Bonifacius, the military ruler of the region.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
Although he defeated the latter at the Battle of Rimini, Bonifacius suffered a fatal wound and was succeeded by his son-in-law Sebastianus as patricius of the Western Roman Empire.
Meanwhile, pressure from the Visigoths and a rebellion by Bonifacius, the governor of Africa, induced the Vandals under King Gaiseric to cross from Spain to Tingitana in what is now Morocco in 429.

Galla Placidia

PlacidiaAelia Galla PlacidiaEmpress Galla Placidia
An ally of Galla Placidia (regent of Valentinian III), Bonifacius engaged in Roman civil wars on her behalf against the generals Flavius Felix in 427-429 and Flavius Aetius in 432.
Among her early supporters was Bonifacius, governor of the Diocese of Africa.

Siege of Massilia (413)

defeatedSiege of Massilia
Bonifatius first appears as a general of Constantius III in 413, where he defeated the Visigoths of Athaulf at Massilia; he allegedly threw a weapon and wounded the Gothic king himself.
The city was defended by the capable Roman general Bonifacius.

Castinus

Flavius Castinus
Bonifatius and Castinus then prepared to launch a campaign against the Vandals and Alans in Spain, but Bonifatius' forces never arrived as the two commanders had quarreled constantly since its inception.
However, the campaign was compromised at the very beginning when, according to one source, "his haughty and inept exercise of command" led to a quarrel between him and the military tribune Bonifacius, a protégé of Empress Galla Placidia.

Patrician (ancient Rome)

patricianpatrikiospatricians
Although he defeated the latter at the Battle of Rimini, Bonifacius suffered a fatal wound and was succeeded by his son-in-law Sebastianus as patricius of the Western Roman Empire.
In the Western Roman Empire, the title was sparingly used and retained its high prestige, being awarded, especially in the 5th century, to the powerful magistri militum who dominated the state, such as Stilicho, Constantius III, Flavius Aetius, Comes Bonifacius, and Ricimer.

Joannes

Joannes AugustusJohn
After the death of Emperor Honorius the primicerius notariorum Joannes was elevated to the throne by Castinus in 424, and Bonifatius responded by cutting off the Grain supply from North Africa, showing his support for Placidia and Theodosius II.
And Bonifacius, Comes of the Diocese of Africa, held back the grain fleet destined to Rome.

Tangier

TangerŢanjaTingis
The Vandals crossed near Roman Tingis, and an inscription at Altava dated to 429 mentions the deceased was wounded by a "barbarian" during the Vandal advance across Africa.
Probably invited by Count Boniface, who feared war with the empress dowager, tens of thousands of Vandals under Gaiseric crossed into North Africa in 429 and occupied Tingis and Mauretania as far east as Calama.

Sigisvultus

Flavius Sigisvultus
When news reached Ravenna, Felix sent the Comes Sigisvultus against Bonifacius, who campaigned with his Goths in Africa for two years.
He was sent in 427 to command the war in Africa against a rebellious general, Bonifacius, after previous generals had been defeated by the latter, and may have been appointed comes Africae, succeeding Bonifacius.

Magister militum

magistri militummagister peditummagister militum per Orientem
Bonifatius was accused of attempting to form his own empire in Roman Africa at the allegation of Flavius Constantius Felix, who had also been a staunch supporter of Placidia and had been installed as the magister utriusque militiae of the west by Theodosius II. Placidia ordered Felix to send an army to restore the vital province in response.
431 - 432: Bonifacius

Gaiseric

GeisericGeiserikGenseric
Their campaign was briefly halted by Darius, who negotiated a brief truce, but Gaiseric quickly resumed.
He might have been invited by the Roman governor Bonifacius, who wished to use the military strength of the Vandals in his struggle against the imperial government.

Carthage

CarthaginianCarthaginiansCarthaginian army
Mavortius and Gallio, generals of Felix, led a Roman force against Bonifatius, assisted by Hun Foederati under Sanoeces, and laid siege to him at Carthage.
The political fallout from the deep disaffection of African Christians is supposedly a crucial factor in the ease with which Carthage and the other centers were captured in the fifth century by Gaiseric, king of the Vandals, who defeated the Roman general Bonifacius and made the city the capital of the Vandal Kingdom.

Calama (Numidia)

CalamaDonutus ofMalaca
Bonifatius, the African army, and a contingent of supporting Gothic foederati confronted and were defeated by Gaiseric near the city of Calama in 430, after which Bonifatius retreated to the city of Hippo Regius.
The invading Vandals captured and partially destroyed Calama and defeated Count Bonifacius near the city in 431.

Comes

comes rei militariscomitescount
Comes Bonifatius (anglicized as Count Boniface) (d. 432) was a Roman general and governor of the Diocese of Africa.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
Comes Bonifatius (anglicized as Count Boniface) (d. 432) was a Roman general and governor of the Diocese of Africa.

Diocese of Africa

Roman AfricaAfricaAfricam
Comes Bonifatius (anglicized as Count Boniface) (d. 432) was a Roman general and governor of the Diocese of Africa.

Visigoths

VisigothicVisigothGothic
He campaigned against the Visigoths in Roman Gaul and the Vandals in Roman North Africa. Bonifatius first appears as a general of Constantius III in 413, where he defeated the Visigoths of Athaulf at Massilia; he allegedly threw a weapon and wounded the Gothic king himself.

Roman Gaul

GaulGallo-RomanGallic
He campaigned against the Visigoths in Roman Gaul and the Vandals in Roman North Africa.

Africa (Roman province)

AfricaAfrica ProconsularisRoman Africa
He campaigned against the Visigoths in Roman Gaul and the Vandals in Roman North Africa. Bonifatius was accused of attempting to form his own empire in Roman Africa at the allegation of Flavius Constantius Felix, who had also been a staunch supporter of Placidia and had been installed as the magister utriusque militiae of the west by Theodosius II. Placidia ordered Felix to send an army to restore the vital province in response.

Constantius III

ConstantiusFlavius Constantius
Bonifatius first appears as a general of Constantius III in 413, where he defeated the Visigoths of Athaulf at Massilia; he allegedly threw a weapon and wounded the Gothic king himself.