Bonnie and Clyde (film)

Bonnie and ClydeBonnie & ClydeBonnie and Clyde'' (film)Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker
Bonnie and Clyde is a 1967 American biographical crime film directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the title characters Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.wikipedia
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Arthur Penn

Mr. PennPenn
Bonnie and Clyde is a 1967 American biographical crime film directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the title characters Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.
Penn directed critically acclaimed films throughout the 1960s such as the drama The Chase (1966), the biographical crime film Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and the comedy Alice's Restaurant (1969).

Michael J. Pollard

The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder (first film role), Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles.
He is best known for playing C.W. Moss in the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde, which earned him an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor nomination.

Faye Dunaway

Dunaway, FayeFaye DunnawayGay Dunaway
Bonnie and Clyde is a 1967 American biographical crime film directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the title characters Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.
She made her screen debut in the 1967 film The Happening, and rose to fame that same year with her portrayal of outlaw Bonnie Parker in Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde, for which she received her first Academy Award nomination.

Warren Beatty

BeattyMr. Beatty
Bonnie and Clyde is a 1967 American biographical crime film directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the title characters Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.
Among his Golden Globe-nominated films are Splendor in the Grass (1961), his screen debut, and Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Shampoo (1975), Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981), Dick Tracy (1990), Bugsy (1991), Bulworth (1998) and Rules Don't Apply (2016), all of which he also produced.

Gene Hackman

HackmanThe Gene Hackman
The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder (first film role), Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles.
He first came to fame in 1967 with his performance as Buck Barrow in Bonnie and Clyde, when he received his first Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor.

Estelle Parsons

The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder (first film role), Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles. The film received Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons) and Best Cinematography (Burnett Guffey).
She received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Blanche Barrow in Bonnie and Clyde (1967), and was also nominated for her work in Rachel, Rachel (1968).

Gene Wilder

Jerome SilbermanWilder
The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder (first film role), Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles.
Although his first film role was portraying a hostage in the 1967 motion picture Bonnie and Clyde, Wilder's first major role was as Leopold Bloom in the 1967 film The Producers for which he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

New Hollywood

American New Wave1970s Hollywoodanti-establishment film
Bonnie and Clyde is considered a landmark film, and is regarded as one of the first films of the New Hollywood era, since it broke many cinematic taboos and was popular with the younger generation.
Films of the early New Hollywood era include Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate, Night of the Living Dead, The Wild Bunch, and Easy Rider, while films including Heaven's Gate and One from the Heart mark the end of the era (despite the two maintaining a cult following years later).

Evans Evans

The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder (first film role), Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles.
Evans Evans (born November 26, 1936) is an American actress known for playing the part of Velma Davis in the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde.

Burnett Guffey

The film received Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons) and Best Cinematography (Burnett Guffey).
He won two Academy Awards: From Here to Eternity (1953) and Bonnie and Clyde (1967).

David Newman (screenwriter)

David NewmanDavid
The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton.
Bonnie and Clyde (with Robert Benton) (1967)

Robert Benton

Benton
The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton.
Benton also garnered three additional Oscar nominations: two for Best Original Screenplay for both Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and The Late Show (1977) and one for Best Adapted Screenplay for Nobody's Fool (1994).

Dub Taylor

The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder (first film role), Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles.
W. Moss, in the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde

National Film Registry

United States National Film RegistryList of films preserved in the United States National Film Registryculturally significant
It was among the first 100 films selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

Robert Towne

P.H. VazakTowne
Robert Towne and Beatty provided uncredited contributions to the script; Beatty also produced the film.
Towne's script for A Time for Killing had been read and admired by Warren Beatty who asked Towne to help out on the script for Bonnie and Clyde (1967).

Denver Pyle

Uncle Jesse Duke
The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder (first film role), Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles.
Pyle portrayed the vengeful Texas Ranger Frank Hamer in the 1967 movie Bonnie and Clyde.

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress

Best Supporting ActressBest Actress in a Supporting RoleAcademy Award
The film received Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons) and Best Cinematography (Burnett Guffey).

Charles Strouse

Strouse
The soundtrack was composed by Charles Strouse.
His film scores include Bonnie and Clyde (1967), There Was a Crooked Man... (1970, with Henry Fonda and Kirk Douglas), The Night They Raided Minsky's (1968, with Adams) and the popular animated movie All Dogs Go to Heaven (1989).

François Truffaut

TruffautFrancois Truffaut
The writers then sent to François Truffaut, renowned director of the New Wave movement, who made contributions to the script.
In 1963, Truffaut was approached to direct an American film called Bonnie and Clyde, with a treatment written by Esquire journalists, David Newman and Robert Benton intended to introduce the French New Wave to Hollywood.

Academy Award for Best Cinematography

Best CinematographyBest Cinematography, Black-and-WhiteBest Cinematography, Color
The film received Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons) and Best Cinematography (Burnett Guffey).

Jane Fonda

JaneHanoi JaneFonda
Those considered for the role were Jane Fonda, Tuesday Weld, Ann-Margret, Leslie Caron, Carol Lynley and Sue Lyon.
Fonda was very selective by the end of the decade, turning down lead roles in Rosemary's Baby and Bonnie and Clyde.

Bonnie and Clyde

Bonnie ParkerClyde BarrowBonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow
Bonnie and Clyde is a 1967 American biographical crime film directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the title characters Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.
Their exploits were revived and cemented in American pop folklore by Arthur Penn's 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde.

Counterculture of the 1960s

counterculture1960s counterculturecountercultural
For some members of the counterculture, the film was considered to be a "rallying cry."
Bonnie and Clyde struck a chord with the youth as "the alienation of the young in the 1960s was comparable to the director's image of the 1930s."

W. D. Jones

William Daniel Jones
The only two members of the Barrow Gang who were alive at the time of the film's release were Blanche Barrow and W. D. Jones.
He was one of two gang members who were consolidated into the "C. W. Moss" character in the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde. "Moss was a dumb kid who run errands and done what Clyde told him," he later said.

1967 in film

19671966/671967 film
Listal lists it as one of the top five grossing films of 1967 with $50,700,000 in US sales, and $70,000,000 worldwide.
It is widely considered as one of the most ground-breaking years in film, with "revolutionary" films highlighting the change, including: Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Cool Hand Luke, The Dirty Dozen, and In the Heat of the Night.