Book of Common Prayer

Prayer BookThe Book of Common Prayer1662 Book of Common PrayerCommon Prayer BookPrayer-BookSecond Prayer Book of Edward VIBCPFirst Prayer Book of Edward VIprayer booksCommon Prayer
Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by other Christian churches historically related to Anglicanism.wikipedia
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Daily Office (Anglican)

EvensongMorning PrayerEvening Prayer
It contained Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, the Litany, and Holy Communion and also the occasional services in full: the orders for Baptism, Confirmation, Marriage, "prayers to be said with the sick", and a funeral service.
These services are generally celebrated according to set forms contained in the various local editions of the Book of Common Prayer.

Anglican Communion

AnglicanAnglican ChurchAnglicans
Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by other Christian churches historically related to Anglicanism.
Early in its development, Anglicanism developed a vernacular prayer book, called the Book of Common Prayer.

Thomas Cranmer

Archbishop CranmerCranmerCranmer Square
The 1549 book was soon succeeded by a more reformed revision in 1552 under the same editorial hand, that of Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury.
He wrote and compiled the first two editions of the Book of Common Prayer, a complete liturgy for the English Church.

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
That edition remains the official prayer book of the Church of England, although through the later twentieth century alternative forms which were technically supplements largely displaced the Book of Common Prayer for the main Sunday worship of most English parish churches.
A new pattern of worship was set out in the Book of Common Prayer (1549 and 1552).

Peter Martyr Vermigli

Peter MartyrPietro Martire VermigliPietro Martire
Many phrases are characteristic of the German reformer Martin Bucer, the Italian Peter Martyr (who was staying with Cranmer at the time he was finalising drafts) or of his chaplain, Thomas Becon.
In England, he influenced the Edwardian Reformation, including the Eucharistic service of the 1552 Book of Common Prayer.

Exhortation and Litany

English LitanyExhortation and Litany (1544)
The Exhortation and Litany, the earliest English-language service of the Church of England, was the first overt manifestation of his changing views.
The same rite survives, in modified form, in the Book of Common Prayer.

English Civil War

Civil WarCivil WarsEnglish Revolution
Following the tumultuous events surrounding the English Civil War, when the Book was again abolished, another modest revision was published in 1662.
Charles wanted one uniform Church throughout Britain and introduced a new, High Anglican version of the English Book of Common Prayer to Scotland in the middle of 1637.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by other Christian churches historically related to Anglicanism.
The Book of Common Prayer in the Anglican tradition is a guide which provides a set order for church services, containing set prayers, scripture readings, and hymns or sung Psalms.

Prayer book

prayerbookprayer booksbook of prayers
Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by other Christian churches historically related to Anglicanism.

Kyrie

Kyrie eleisonLord, have mercyLord have mercy
The Book of Common Prayer has never contained prescribed music or chant; however, John Merbecke produced his Booke of Common Praier noted in 1550 which set what would have been the proper of the Mass (Kyrie, Gloria, Creed, etc.) in the new BCP to simple plainchant inspired by Sarum Use.
In the 1552 Book of Common Prayer, the Kyrie was inserted into a recitation of the Ten Commandments.

Prayer of Humble Access

The order also included what would become known as the Comfortable Words and the Prayer of Humble Access.
The prayer was an integral part of the early Books of Common Prayer of the Church of England and has continued to be used throughout much of the Anglican Communion.

Mary I of England

Mary IQueen MaryMary
It was used only for a few months, as after Edward VI's death in 1553, his half-sister Mary I restored Roman Catholic worship.
For example, the Act of Uniformity 1549 prescribed Protestant rites for church services, such as the use of Thomas Cranmer's new Book of Common Prayer.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
The original book, published in 1549 in the reign of Edward VI, was a product of the English Reformation following the break with Rome.
Since 2014, clergy in the small personal ordinariates set up for groups of former Anglicans under the terms of the 2009 document Anglicanorum Coetibus are permitted to use a variation of the Roman Rite called "Divine Worship" or, less formally, "Ordinariate Use", which incorporates elements of the Anglican liturgy and traditions, an accommodation protested by Anglican leaders.

Psalms

psalmBook of Psalmspsalmody
Old Testament and New Testament readings for daily prayer were specified in tabular format as were the Psalms; and canticles, mostly biblical, that were provided to be said or sung between the readings.
The version of the psalter in the American Book of Common Prayer prior to the 1979 edition is the Coverdale psalter.

Act of Uniformity 1549

Act of Uniformity15491549 Act of Uniformity
Despite conservative opposition, Parliament passed the Act of Uniformity on 21 January 1549, and the newly authorised Book of Common Prayer was required to be in use by Whitsunday, 9 June.
It established The Book of Common Prayer (The Book of the Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the Church after the use of the Church of England) as the sole legal form of worship in England.

Coverdale Bible

CoverdaleCoverdale's BibleBible
Published in 1544, it borrowed greatly from Martin Luther's Litany and Myles Coverdale's New Testament and was the only service that might be considered to be Protestant to be finished within the lifetime of King Henry VIII.
The Psalter from the Coverdale Bible was included in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer beginning in 1662, and in all editions of the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer until 1979.

Ash Wednesday

ashesAsh-WednesdayNational No Smoking Day
The prayer book had provisions for the daily offices, scripture readings for Sundays and holy days, and services for communion, public baptism, confirmation, matrimony, visitation of the sick, burial, purification of women and Ash Wednesday.
In the Church of England, and throughout much of the Worldwide Anglican Communion, the entire forty days of Lent are designated days of fasting, while the Fridays are also designated as days of abstinence in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, with the Traditional Saint Augustine's Prayer Book: A Book of Devotion for Members of the Anglican Communion defining "Fasting, usually meaning not more than a light breakfast, one full meal, and one half meal, on the forty days of Lent."

English Reformation

Reformationbreak with RomePre-Reformation
The original book, published in 1549 in the reign of Edward VI, was a product of the English Reformation following the break with Rome.
That prayer book and liturgy, the Book of Common Prayer, was authorized by the Act of Uniformity 1549.

Thirty-nine Articles

Six Articles39 ArticlesThirty-Nine Articles of Religion
In other respects, however, both the Baptism and Burial services imply a theology of salvation that accords notably less with Reformed teachings than do the counterpart passages in the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion.
The Thirty-nine Articles form part of the Book of Common Prayer used by both the Church of England and the Episcopal Church.

Eucharist

Holy CommunioncommunionLord's Supper
It contained Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, the Litany, and Holy Communion and also the occasional services in full: the orders for Baptism, Confirmation, Marriage, "prayers to be said with the sick", and a funeral service.
Editions of the Book of Common Prayer from 1559 onwards repeatedly refuse to define the Presence most often referred to as the spiritual food of the Most Precious Body and Blood.

Confirmation

confirmedSacrament of Confirmationconfirmation name
It contained Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, the Litany, and Holy Communion and also the occasional services in full: the orders for Baptism, Confirmation, Marriage, "prayers to be said with the sick", and a funeral service.
The Book of Common Prayer of the Church of England employs the phrase "ratify and confirm" with respect to these vows which has led to the common conception of confirmation as the renewal of baptismal vows.

Churching of women

churchedchurchingChurching ceremony
The prayer book had provisions for the daily offices, scripture readings for Sundays and holy days, and services for communion, public baptism, confirmation, matrimony, visitation of the sick, burial, purification of women and Ash Wednesday.
The 1979 Book of Common Prayer, avoiding any hint of ritual impurity, replaces the older rite with "A Thanksgiving for the Birth or Adoption of a Child."

Collect

collectsCollect of the Day
It also set out in full the "propers" (that is the parts of the service which varied week by week or, at times, daily throughout the Church's Year): the introits, collects, and epistle and gospel readings for the Sunday service of Holy Communion.
The collects in the Book of Common Prayer are mainly translations by Thomas Cranmer (d.

Protestantism

ProtestantProtestantsProtestant church
It was no mere translation from the Latin: its Protestant character is made clear by the drastic reduction of the place of saints, compressing what had been the major part into three petitions.
Unique to Anglicanism is the Book of Common Prayer, the collection of services that worshippers in most Anglican churches used for centuries.

John Knox

KnoxKnox’sMartha Knox
A bitter and very public dispute ensued between those, such as Edmund Grindal and Richard Cox, who wished to preserve in exile the exact form of worship of the 1552 Prayer Book; and those, such as John Knox the minister of the congregation, who regarded that book as still partially tainted with compromise.
He exerted a reforming influence on the text of the Book of Common Prayer.