Book of Deuteronomy

Moses receiving the Law (top) and reading the Law to the Israelites (bottom)
Moses viewing the Promised Land, Deuteronomy 34:1–5 (James Tissot)
The Book of Deuteronomy, Debarim. Hebrew with translation into Judeo-Arabic, transcribed in Hebrew letters. From Livorno, 1894 CE. Moroccan Jewish Museum, Casablanca.

Fifth book of the Torah, and the fifth book of the Christian Old Testament.

- Book of Deuteronomy
Moses receiving the Law (top) and reading the Law to the Israelites (bottom)

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This 1768 parchment (612×502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Ten Commandments at the Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue

Ten Commandments

The Ten Commandments (עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת, Aseret ha'Dibrot), also known as the Decalogue, are a set of biblical principles relating to ethics and worship that play a fundamental role in Judaism and Christianity.

The Ten Commandments (עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת, Aseret ha'Dibrot), also known as the Decalogue, are a set of biblical principles relating to ethics and worship that play a fundamental role in Judaism and Christianity.

This 1768 parchment (612×502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Ten Commandments at the Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue
Part of the All Souls Deuteronomy, containing the oldest extant copy of the Decalogue. It is dated to the early Herodian period, between 30 and 1 BC
1896 illustration depicting Moses receiving the commandments
Moses Breaking the Tablets of the Law (1659) by Rembrandt
The Ten Commandments on a glass plate
Moses and Aaron with the Ten Commandments (painting circa 1675 by Aron de Chavez)
A Christian school in India displays the Ten Commandments.
Moses receives the Ten Commandments in this 1860 woodcut by Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld, a Lutheran.
The Sixth Commandment, as translated by the Book of Common Prayer (1549).
The image is from the altar screen of the Temple Church near the Law Courts in London.
18th-century depiction of Moses receiving the tablets (Monheim Town Hall)
Print of Moses showing the Ten Commandments. Made at the end of the sixteenth century
Ten Commandments display at the Texas State Capitol in Austin
Ten Commandments Monument at the Arkansas State Capitol
The Ten Commandments by Lucas Cranach the Elder in the townhall of Wittenberg (detail)

The text of the Ten Commandments appears twice in the Hebrew Bible: at Exodus and Deuteronomy.

Map showing the borders of the Promised Land, based on the Bible..

Promised Land

Land which, according to the Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament), God promised and subsequently gave to Abraham and to his descendants.

Land which, according to the Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament), God promised and subsequently gave to Abraham and to his descendants.

Map showing the borders of the Promised Land, based on the Bible..
Map showing one interpretation of the borders of the Promised Land, based on God's promise to Abraham.
Yahweh (God) shows Moses the Promised Land (Frans Pourbus the Elder, c. 1565–80)
Pastoral scene of the Promised Land
The concept is central to Zionism. In 1896, Herzl exhorted Jews to take up the movement, writing "for these have never lost the faith in the Promised Land".

The Israelites conquered and occupied a smaller area of former Canaanite land and land east of the Jordan River after Moses led the Exodus out of Egypt, and the Book of Deuteronomy presents this occupation as God's fulfillment of the promise.

Torah scroll at old Glockengasse Synagogue (reconstruction), Cologne

Torah

Torah scroll at old Glockengasse Synagogue (reconstruction), Cologne
Silver Torah case, Ottoman Empire, displayed in the Museum of Jewish Art and History
Reading of the Torah
One common formulation of the documentary hypothesis
The supplementary hypothesis, one potential successor to the documentary hypothesis
Presentation of The Torah, by Édouard Moyse, 1860, Museum of Jewish Art and History
Torahs in Ashkenazi Synagogue (Istanbul, Turkey)
Page pointers, or yad, for reading of the Torah
Open Torah case with scroll.

The Torah ( Tōrā, "Instruction", "Teaching" or "Law") is the compilation of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, namely the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

The interrelationship between various significant ancient manuscripts of the Old Testament, according to the Encyclopaedia Biblica (1903). Some manuscripts are identified by their siglum. LXX here denotes the original Septuagint.

Old Testament

First division of the Christian biblical canon, which is based primarily upon the 24 books of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, a collection of ancient religious Hebrew writings by the Israelites.

First division of the Christian biblical canon, which is based primarily upon the 24 books of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, a collection of ancient religious Hebrew writings by the Israelites.

The interrelationship between various significant ancient manuscripts of the Old Testament, according to the Encyclopaedia Biblica (1903). Some manuscripts are identified by their siglum. LXX here denotes the original Septuagint.

The first five books—Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, book of Numbers and Deuteronomy—reached their present form in the Persian period (538–332 BC), and their authors were the elite of exilic returnees who controlled the Temple at that time.

Hebrew Bible text of Deuteronomy 32:1–4 as written in a Jewish Sefer Torah.

Song of Moses

Hebrew Bible text of Deuteronomy 32:1–4 as written in a Jewish Sefer Torah.

The Song of Moses is the name sometimes given to the poem which appears in Deuteronomy of the Hebrew Bible, which according to the Bible was delivered just prior to Moses' death on Mount Nebo.

Departure of the Israelites (David Roberts, 1829)

The Exodus

Departure of the Israelites (David Roberts, 1829)
Israel in Egypt (Edward Poynter, 1867)
Lamentations over the Death of the First-Born of Egypt by Charles Sprague Pearce (1877)
Illustration of the Exodus from Egypt by the Providence Lithograph Company, 1907
Ramesses II, one of several suggested pharaohs in the Exodus narrative
Ezra Reads the Law to the People (Gustave Doré's illustrations for La Grande Bible de Tours, 1866)
A Seder table setting, commemorating the Passover and Exodus

The Exodus (Hebrew: יציאת מצרים, Yeẓi’at Miẓrayim: ) is the founding myth of the Israelites whose narrative is spread over four books of the Torah or Pentateuch, namely Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.

 Shema Yisrael  at the Knesset Menorah in Jerusalem

Shema Yisrael

Jewish prayer (known as the Shema) that serves as a centerpiece of the morning and evening Jewish prayer services.

Jewish prayer (known as the Shema) that serves as a centerpiece of the morning and evening Jewish prayer services.

 Shema Yisrael  at the Knesset Menorah in Jerusalem
The first paragraph of the Shema seen in a Tefillin scroll
Schneur Zalman of Liadi articulated Divine Unity in Hasidic philosophy.

This is not only a commandment directly given in the Bible (in Deuteronomy 6:6–7), but is also alluded to from verses such as "Commune with your own heart upon your bed" (Psalms 4:4).

Date palms near Tell el-Hammam, identified by many scholars as Abel-Shittim of the Plains of Moab

Plains of Moab

Date palms near Tell el-Hammam, identified by many scholars as Abel-Shittim of the Plains of Moab

The Plains of Moab (עַרְבוֹת מוֹאָב) are mentioned in three books of the Hebrew Bible (Numbers, Deuteronomy and Joshua) as an area in Transjordan, stretching along the Jordan "across from Jericho", and more specifically "from Beth Jeshimoth to Abel Shittim".

A 4th-century BCE silver coin from the Persian province of Yehud Medinata, possibly representing Yahweh enthroned on a winged wheel

Yahweh

The national god of ancient Israel and Judah.

The national god of ancient Israel and Judah.

A 4th-century BCE silver coin from the Persian province of Yehud Medinata, possibly representing Yahweh enthroned on a winged wheel
Late Bronze Age statuette of a storm god from Phoenician Antaradus
Early Iron Age bull figurine from Bull Site at Dhahrat et-Tawileh (modern West Bank, ancient Ephraim), representing El, Baal or Yahweh
Painting on a jar found at Kuntillet Ajrud, under the inscription "Yahweh of Samaria and his Asherah" (c. 800 BCE)
The Second Temple, as rebuilt by Herod c. 20–10 BCE (modern model, 1:50 scale)
Solomon dedicates the Temple at Jerusalem (painting by James Tissot or follower, c. 1896–1902).

El and his seventy sons, who included Baal and Yahweh, made up the Assembly of the Gods, each member of which had a human nation under his care; a textual variant of Deuteronomy 32:8–9 describes Yahweh receiving Israel when El divided the nations of the world among his sons:

Herod's Temple as imagined in the Holyland Model of Jerusalem. It is currently situated adjacent to the Shrine of the Book exhibit at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Temple in Jerusalem

Two ancient Israelite and Jewish places of worship on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem have been called the Temple in Jerusalem, or the Holy Temple (בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ, Modern: Bēt HaMīqdaš, Tiberian: Bēṯ HamMīqdāš; بيت المقدس Bait al-Maqdis).

Two ancient Israelite and Jewish places of worship on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem have been called the Temple in Jerusalem, or the Holy Temple (בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ, Modern: Bēt HaMīqdaš, Tiberian: Bēṯ HamMīqdāš; بيت المقدس Bait al-Maqdis).

Herod's Temple as imagined in the Holyland Model of Jerusalem. It is currently situated adjacent to the Shrine of the Book exhibit at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.
The Trumpeting Place inscription, a stone (2.43×1 m) with Hebrew writing "To the Trumpeting Place" uncovered during archaeological excavations by Benjamin Mazar at the southern foot of the Temple Mount is believed to be a part of the complex of the Second Temple.
Remnants of the 1st-century Stairs of Ascent in front of the Double Gate, discovered by archaeologist Benjamin Mazar.
Diagram of the Temple (top of diagram is north)
Model of Second Temple made by Michael Osnis from Kedumim.
Ezekiel's Temple as imagined by Charles Chipiez in the 19th century.
Model of the First Temple, included in a Bible manual for teachers (1922)
The Foundation Stone in the floor of the Dome of the Rock shrine in Jerusalem. The round hole at upper left penetrates to a small cave, known as the Well of Souls, below. The cage-like structure just beyond the hole covers the stairway entrance to the cave (south is towards the top of the image).
The bottom of the Foundation Stone, photo taken from the Well of Souls
Arch of Titus relief showing the Menorah from the Temple as spoils of the Romans

According to the Book of Deuteronomy, as the sole place of Israelite korban (sacrifice), the Temple replaced the Tabernacle constructed in the Sinai under the auspices of Moses, as well as local sanctuaries, and altars in the hills.