Book of Exodus

ExodusEx.ShemotExod.Exodus 3ShemosExExodus 21:12Biblebiblical tale
The Book of Exodus or Exodus is the second book of the Torah and the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament) immediately following Genesis.wikipedia
894 Related Articles

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
Led by their prophet Moses they journey through the wilderness to Mount Sinai, where Yahweh promises them the land of Canaan (the "Promised Land") in return for their faithfulness. The Pharaoh's daughter finds the child, names him Moses, and brings him up as her own.
According to the Book of Exodus, Moses was born in a time when his people, the Israelites, an enslaved minority, were increasing in numbers and the Egyptian Pharaoh was worried that they might ally themselves with Egypt's enemies.

Mount Sinai

SinaiMt. SinaiJebel Musa
Led by their prophet Moses they journey through the wilderness to Mount Sinai, where Yahweh promises them the land of Canaan (the "Promised Land") in return for their faithfulness.
Mount Sinai is mentioned many times in the Book of Exodus and other books of the Bible, and the Quran.

Canaan

Canaaniteland of CanaanCanaanites
Led by their prophet Moses they journey through the wilderness to Mount Sinai, where Yahweh promises them the land of Canaan (the "Promised Land") in return for their faithfulness. Moses goes up the mountain into the presence of God, who pronounces the Covenant Code (a detailed code of ritual and civil law), and promises Canaan to them if they obey.
Purple cloth became a renowned Canaanite export commodity which is mentioned in Exodus.

Torah

LawPentateuchMosaic Law
The Book of Exodus or Exodus is the second book of the Torah and the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament) immediately following Genesis.
Interspersed in the narrative are the specific teachings (religious obligations and civil laws) given explicitly (i.e. Ten Commandments) or implicitly embedded in the narrative (as in Exodus 12 and 13 laws of the celebration of Passover).

Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
The Book of Exodus or Exodus is the second book of the Torah and the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament) immediately following Genesis.
The first five books – Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, book of Numbers and Deuteronomy – reached their present form in the Persian period (538–332 BC), and their authors were the elite of exilic returnees who controlled the Temple at that time.

Mosaic authorship

MosesAccording to traditionascribed to Moses
Traditionally ascribed to Moses himself, modern scholarship sees the book as initially a product of the Babylonian exile (6th century BCE), based on earlier written and oral traditions, with final revisions in the Persian post-exilic period (5th century BCE).
The Torah (or Pentateuch, as biblical scholars sometimes call it) is the collective name for the first five books of the Bible - Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.

Finding of Moses

cast adriftfinding Moses hidden in the rushesraised by
A Levite woman (identified elsewhere as Jochebed) saves her baby by setting him adrift on the river Nile in an ark of bulrushes.
The Finding of Moses, sometimes called Moses in the Bullrushes, Moses Saved from the Waters, or other variants, is the story in chapter 2 of the Book of Exodus in the Hebrew Bible of the finding in the River Nile of Moses as a baby by the daughter of Pharaoh.

Pharaoh's daughter (Exodus)

Pharaoh's daughterBatyaBithiah
The Pharaoh's daughter finds the child, names him Moses, and brings him up as her own.
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
The Book of Exodus or Exodus is the second book of the Torah and the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament) immediately following Genesis.
Shemot (שִׁמוֹת, literally "The names [of]") — Exodus

Zipporah

SephoraTzipporahJethro's daughter
There he marries Zipporah, the daughter of Midianite priest Jethro, and encounters God in a burning bush.
Zipporah or Tzipora (, Tsippōrāh, "bird") is mentioned in the Book of Exodus as the wife of Moses, and the daughter of Reuel/Jethro, the priest or prince of Midian and the spiritual founder and ancestor of the Druze.

Burning bush

bushbush that burnedBuisson Ardent
There he marries Zipporah, the daughter of Midianite priest Jethro, and encounters God in a burning bush.
The burning bush is an object described by the Book of Exodus as being located on Mount Horeb.

Jochebed

YochevedJochabedJochebed (Moses' mother)
A Levite woman (identified elsewhere as Jochebed) saves her baby by setting him adrift on the river Nile in an ark of bulrushes.
The story of Jochebed is thought to be described in the Book of Exodus (2:1–10) - although she is not explicitly named here.

Plagues of Egypt

ten plaguesplagueten plagues of Egypt
God smites the Egyptians with 10 terrible plagues (Plagues of Egypt) including a river of blood, many frogs, and the death of first-born sons.
The Plagues of Egypt, also called the ten plagues, were ten calamities that, according to the biblical Book of Exodus, God inflicted upon Egypt as a demonstration of power, after which the Pharaoh conceded to Moses' demands to let the enslaved Israelites go into the wilderness to make sacrifices.

Ark of bulrushes

reed" basketwatertight cradle
A Levite woman (identified elsewhere as Jochebed) saves her baby by setting him adrift on the river Nile in an ark of bulrushes.
The ark of bulrushes was a container which, according to the episode known as the finding of Moses in the biblical Book of Exodus, carried the infant Moses.

Yahweh

GodYahGod of Israel
The book tells how the Israelites leave slavery in Egypt through the strength of Yahweh, the god who has chosen Israel as his people.
The returnees had a particular interest in the history of Israel: the written Torah (the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy), for example, may have existed in various forms during the Monarchy (the period of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah), but it was in the Second Temple that it was edited and revised into something like its current form, and the Chronicles, a new history written at this time, reflects the concerns of the Persian Yehud in its almost-exclusive focus on Judah and the Temple.

Manna

foodHamonnHeaven-sent gift
The desert proves arduous, and the Israelites complain and long for Egypt, but God provides manna and miraculous water for them.
In the description in the Book of Exodus, manna is described as being "a fine, flake-like thing" like the frost on the ground.

Crossing the Red Sea

parting of the Red Seacrossing of the Red Seasplitting of the Red Sea
One strong possibility is that it is a diptych (i.e., divided into two parts), with the division between parts 1 and 2 at the crossing of the Red Sea or at the beginning of the theophany (appearance of God) in chapter 19. On this plan, the first part tells of God's rescue of his people from Egypt and their journey under his care to Sinai (chapters 1–19) and the second tells of the covenant between them (chapters 20–40).
The Crossing of the Red Sea (Hebrew: קריעת ים סוף Kriat Yam Suph – Crossing of the Red Sea or Sea of Reeds) is part of the biblical narrative of the Exodus, the escape of the Israelites, led by Moses, from the pursuing Egyptians in the Book of Exodus.

Jethro (biblical figure)

JethroReuelJethro*
There he marries Zipporah, the daughter of Midianite priest Jethro, and encounters God in a burning bush.
In Exodus, Moses' father-in-law is initially referred to as "Reuel" (Exodus 2:18) but then as "Jethro" (Exodus 3:1).

Ten Commandments

DecaloguecommandmentCommandments
God pronounces the Ten Commandments (the Ethical Decalogue) in the hearing of all Israel.
The Ten Commandments appear twice in the Hebrew Bible, in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy.

Covenant Code

Book of the Covenant
Moses goes up the mountain into the presence of God, who pronounces the Covenant Code (a detailed code of ritual and civil law), and promises Canaan to them if they obey.
The Covenant Code, or Book of the Covenant, is the name given by academics to a text appearing in the Torah, at Exodus -; or, more strictly, the term Covenant Code may be applied to Exodus 21:1-22:16.

Sabbath

day of restJewish Sabbathcelebrated Sundays
Moses assembles the Hebrews and repeats to them the commandments he has received from God, which are to keep the Sabbath and to construct the Tabernacle.
According to the Book of Exodus the Sabbath is a day of rest on the seventh day, commanded by God to be kept as a holy day of rest, as God rested from creation.

Tabernacle

Tent of MeetingMishkanSanctuary
Israel enters into a covenant with Yahweh who gives them their laws and instructions to build the Tabernacle, the means by which he will come here from heaven and dwell with them and lead them in a holy war to possess the land, and then give them peace.
The main source describing the tabernacle is the biblical Book of Exodus, specifically Exodus 25–31 and 35–40.

High Priest of Israel

High PriestJewish High PriestHigh Priests
Aaron is appointed as the first hereditary high priest.
Even though Aaron was the first high priest mentioned in the Book of Exodus, Louis Ginzberg in Legends of the Jews noted that in legends the first man that assumed the title of high priest of God is Enoch who was succeeded by Methuselah, Lamech, Noah, Shem (or Melchizedek), Abraham, Isaac, and Levi.

Carol Meyers

Carol Meyers in her commentary on Exodus suggests that it is arguably the most important book in the Bible, as it presents the defining features of Israel's identity: memories of a past marked by hardship and escape, a binding covenant with God, who chooses Israel, and the establishment of the life of the community and the guidelines for sustaining it.
Meyers has also written commentaries on Exodus, Haggai, and Zechariah.

Tablet (religious)

tabletstabletreligious tablets
At the conclusion of the 40 days and 40 nights, Moses returns holding the set of stone tablets.
According to the Book of Exodus, God delivered the tablets twice, the first set having been smashed by Moses in his anger at the idol-worship of the Israelites.