Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.GenBereshitBereishisBereishitCreationCreation narrativeGenesis 3Genesis 36
The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek "γένεσις", meaning "Origin";, "Bərēšīṯ", "In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Old Testament.wikipedia
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Primeval history

first chapters of Genesisfirst eleven chaptersThe Early Narratives of Genesis
It can be divided into two parts, the Primeval history (chapters 1–11) and the Ancestral history (chapters 12–50).
The primeval history, the name given by biblical scholars to the first eleven chapters of the Book of Genesis, is a story of the first years of the world's existence.

Isaac

SonYitzchak/IsaacYitzhak
At God's command Noah's descendant Abraham journeys from his home into the land of Canaan, given to him by God, where he dwells as a sojourner, as does his son Isaac and his grandson Jacob.
Isaac is one of the three patriarchs of the Israelites, according to the biblical Book of Genesis.

Jacob

Israelsons of JacobJacob (Israel)
At God's command Noah's descendant Abraham journeys from his home into the land of Canaan, given to him by God, where he dwells as a sojourner, as does his son Isaac and his grandson Jacob.
According to the Book of Genesis, Jacob was the third Hebrew progenitor with whom God made a covenant.

Patriarchal age

Ancestral historyPatriarchpatriarchal narratives
It can be divided into two parts, the Primeval history (chapters 1–11) and the Ancestral history (chapters 12–50).
The patriarchal age is the era of the three biblical patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, according to the narratives of Genesis 12–50.

Noah

NoachianNoebecome intoxicated
The primeval history sets out the author's (or authors') concepts of the nature of the deity and of humankind's relationship with its maker: God creates a world which is good and fit for mankind, but when man corrupts it with sin God decides to destroy his creation, saving only the righteous Noah to reestablish the relationship between man and God. First, he instructs the righteous Noah and his family to build an ark and put examples of all the animals on it, seven pairs of every clean animal and one pair of every unclean.
The primary account of Noah in the Bible is in the Book of Genesis.

Covenant (biblical)

covenantcovenantsbiblical covenants
The narrative is punctuated by a series of covenants with God, successively narrowing in scope from all mankind (the covenant with Noah) to a special relationship with one people alone (Abraham and his descendants through Isaac and Jacob).
The Hebrew Bible contains the Noahic Covenant (in Genesis), which is between God and all people, as well as a number of more specific covenants with individuals or groups.

Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek "γένεσις", meaning "Origin";, "Bərēšīṯ", "In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Old Testament.
The first five books – Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, book of Numbers and Deuteronomy – reached their present form in the Persian period (538–332 BC), and their authors were the elite of exilic returnees who controlled the Temple at that time.

Joseph (Genesis)

JosephJoseph in Potiphar's houseBiblical Joseph
Jacob's name is changed to Israel, and through the agency of his son Joseph, the children of Israel descend into Egypt, 70 people in all with their households, and God promises them a future of greatness.
Joseph ( meaning "Increase", Standard Yosef Tiberian Yôsēp̄; يوسف Yūsuf or Yūsif; Iōsēph) is an important figure in the Bible's Book of Genesis.

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
Genesis ends with Israel in Egypt, ready for the coming of Moses and the Exodus.
Moses has traditionally been regarded as the author of those four books and the Book of Genesis, which together comprise the Torah, the first section of the Hebrew Bible.

Genesis creation narrative

CreationGenesiscreation of the world
God creates the world in six days and consecrates the seventh as a day of rest.
The narrative is made up of two stories, roughly equivalent to the first two chapters of the Book of Genesis.

Garden of Eden

EdenEdenicParadise
God creates the first humans Adam and Eve and all the animals in the Garden of Eden but instructs them not to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil.
The Garden of Eden (Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen), also called Paradise, is the biblical "garden of God" described in the Book of Genesis and the Book of Ezekiel.

Vulgate

Latin VulgateVulgate Biblevg
The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek "γένεσις", meaning "Origin";, "Bərēšīṯ", "In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Old Testament.
Many Latin words were taken from the Vulgate into English nearly unchanged in meaning or spelling: creatio (e.g. Genesis 1:1, Heb 9:11), salvatio (e.g. Is 37:32, Eph 2:5), justificatio (e.g. Rom 4:25, Heb 9:1), testamentum (e.g. Mt 26:28), sanctificatio (1 Ptr 1:2, 1 Cor 1:30), regeneratio (Mt 19:28), and raptura (from a noun form of the verb rapere in 1 Thes 4:17).

Adam and Eve

AdamEveAdam, Eve
God creates the first humans Adam and Eve and all the animals in the Garden of Eden but instructs them not to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil.
In the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Bible, chapters one through five, there are two creation narratives with two distinct perspectives.

Fall of man

Fallthe Fallthe fall of man
This is interpreted by Christians as the fall of humanity.
Although not named in the Bible, the doctrine of the fall comes from a biblical interpretation of Genesis chapter 3.

Mosaic authorship

MosesAccording to traditionascribed to Moses
Tradition credits Moses as the author of Genesis, as well as the books of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and most of Deuteronomy, but modern scholars increasingly see them as a product of the 6th and 5th centuries BC.
The Torah (or Pentateuch, as biblical scholars sometimes call it) is the collective name for the first five books of the Bible - Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek "γένεσις", meaning "Origin";, "Bərēšīṯ", "In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Old Testament.
Bereshit (בְּרֵאשִׁית, literally "In the beginning") — Genesis

Biblical Sabbath

SabbathSabbatarianSabbath day
God creates the world in six days and consecrates the seventh as a day of rest.
Book of Genesis: In, God creates the heavens and earth in six days (each day is defined as evening and morning) and rests on the seventh day, which he thus confers with special status. So God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it God rested from all his work that he had done in Creation. — This passage uses root form shabath, rather than intensified form Shabbath; neither the noun form nor a positive Sabbath command appears in Genesis. In, Noah's ark comes to "rest" in the seventh month (later revealed as the month of Shabbathown); here the word for "rest" is not shabath but its synonym nuwach, the root of Noah's name.

Noah's Ark

Arkthe ArkFlood
First, he instructs the righteous Noah and his family to build an ark and put examples of all the animals on it, seven pairs of every clean animal and one pair of every unclean.
Noah's Ark (תיבת נח; Biblical Hebrew: Tevat Noaḥ) is the vessel in the Genesis flood narrative (Genesis chapters 6–9) through which God spares Noah, his family, and a remnant of all the world's animals from a world-engulfing flood.

Tower of Babel

Babelconfusion of tonguesthe Tower of Babel
God sees mankind cooperating to build a great tower city, the Tower of Babel, and divides humanity with many languages and sets them apart with confusion.
The Tower of Babel (undefined, Migdal Bavel) as told in Genesis 11:1-9 is an origin myth meant to explain why the world's peoples speak different languages.

Genesis flood narrative

Great FloodFloodDeluge
Then God sends a great flood to wipe out the rest of the world.
The Genesis flood narrative is a flood myth found in the Tanakh (chapters 6–9 in the Book of Genesis).

Book of Numbers

NumbersBamidbarNum.
Tradition credits Moses as the author of Genesis, as well as the books of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and most of Deuteronomy, but modern scholars increasingly see them as a product of the 6th and 5th centuries BC.
As such it draws to a conclusion the themes introduced in Genesis and played out in Exodus and Leviticus: God has promised the Israelites that they shall become a great (i.e. numerous) nation, that they will have a special relationship with Yahweh their god, and that they shall take possession of the land of Canaan.

Cain and Abel

CainAbelCain's murder of Abel
Eve bears two sons, Cain and Abel.
In the biblical Book of Genesis, Cain and Abel are the first two sons of Adam and Eve.

Hagar

HajarAgarHagar and Ishmael
Because Sarah is old, she tells Abraham to take her Egyptian handmaiden, Hagar, as a second wife.
Hagar (, Hagar, of uncertain origin; هاجره‎ Hājirah; Agar) is a biblical person in the Book of Genesis.

Sodom and Gomorrah

SodomGomorrahSodomites
God resolves to destroy the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah for the sins of their people.
Sodom and Gomorrah were cities mentioned in the Book of Genesis and throughout the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and in the deuterocanonical books, as well as in the Quran and the hadith.

Lot (biblical person)

LotLot's wifeLot and his Daughters
Angels save Abraham's nephew Lot and his family, but his wife looks back on the destruction against their command and is turned into a pillar of salt.
Lot was a patriarch in the biblical Book of Genesis chapters 11–14 and 19. Notable events in his life include his journey with his uncle Abram (Abraham) and his flight from the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, during which Lot's wife became a pillar of salt, and Lot had sexual relations with his daughters so that they could bear children.