Book of Judges

JudgesShofetimBooks of JudgesJudges (16:28)Judges 6Judges 9Judges periodjudges period in IsraelJudicesJudicum
The Book of Judges is the seventh book of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament.wikipedia
417 Related Articles

Biblical judges

Judgesjudgebiblical judge
In the narrative of the Hebrew Bible, it covers the time between the conquest described in the Book of Joshua and the establishment of a kingdom in the Books of Samuel, during which Biblical judges served as temporary leaders.
The biblical judges are described in the Hebrew Bible, and mostly in the Book of Judges, as people who served roles as military leaders in times of crisis, in the period before an Israelite monarchy was established.

Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuel
In the narrative of the Hebrew Bible, it covers the time between the conquest described in the Book of Joshua and the establishment of a kingdom in the Books of Samuel, during which Biblical judges served as temporary leaders.
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.

Deborah

Song of DeborahDeborah de ArimatéiaDeborah the prophetess
Scholars consider many of the stories in Judges to be the oldest in the Deuteronomistic history, with their major redaction dated to the 8th century BCE and with materials such as the Song of Deborah dating from much earlier. Deborah the prophetess, accompanied by Barak the army leader (4–5), vs. Jabin of Hazor (a city in Canaan) and Sisera, his captain
According to the Book of Judges, Deborah (, Devora, "Bee") was a prophetess of Yahweh the God of the Israelites, the fourth Judge of pre-monarchic Israel and the only female judge mentioned in the Bible, and the wife of Lapidoth.

Deuteronomist

Deuteronomistic historydeuteronomic historyDeuteronomistic historian
Scholars consider many of the stories in Judges to be the oldest in the Deuteronomistic history, with their major redaction dated to the 8th century BCE and with materials such as the Song of Deborah dating from much earlier.
Seen by most scholars more as a school or movement than a single author, Deuteronomistic material is found in the book of Deuteronomy, in the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings (the Deuteronomistic history, or DtrH), and also in the book of Jeremiah.

Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
The Book of Judges is the seventh book of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament.
The books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings follow, forming a history of Israel from the Conquest of Canaan to the Siege of Jerusalem c. 587 BC.

Shamgar

There are also brief glosses on six minor judges: Shamgar (3:31), Tola and Jair (10:1–5), Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon (12:8–15).
Shamgar, son of Anath ( Šamgar), is the name of one or possibly two individuals named in the Book of Judges.

Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Cambridge BibleCambridge Bible for Schools
Judges follows on from the Book of Joshua and opens with reference to Joshua's death (cf. ). The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges suggests that "the death of Joshua may be regarded as marking the division between the period of conquest and the period of occupation", the latter being the focus of the Book of Judges.

Shechem

ŠakmuSichemJacob's Well
The Israelites meet, most likely at the sanctuary at Gilgal or at Shechem (following on from ) and ask the Lord who should be first (in order of time, not of rank) to secure the land they are to occupy.
Shechem's position is indicated in the Hebrew Bible: it lay north of Bethel and Shiloh, on the high road going from Jerusalem to the northern districts (Judges xxi, 19), at a short distance from Michmethath (Joshua 17:7) and of Dothain (Genesis 37:12–17); it was in the hill-country of Ephraim (Joshua 20:7; 21:21; 1 Kings 12:25; 1 Chronicles 6:67; 7:28), immediately below Mount Gerizim (Judges 9:6–7).

Jair

Ya'irYair
There are also brief glosses on six minor judges: Shamgar (3:31), Tola and Jair (10:1–5), Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon (12:8–15).
In the Biblical Book of Judges, Yair (Hebrew: יָאִיר Yā’îr, "he enlightens") was a man from Gilead of the Tribe of Manasseh, east of the River Jordan, who judged Israel for 22 years, after the death of Tola, who had ruled of 23 years.

Tola (biblical figure)

Tola
There are also brief glosses on six minor judges: Shamgar (3:31), Tola and Jair (10:1–5), Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon (12:8–15).
His career is summarised in Judges 10:1-2.

Eglon (king)

EglonKing EglonMoabite King Eglon
Ehud (3:11–29) vs. Eglon of Moab
According to the Book of Judges, Eglon (עֶגְלוֹן ‘Eḡlōn) was a king of Moab who oppressed Israel.

Ehud

the Hebrew judge
Ehud (3:11–29) vs. Eglon of Moab
Ehud ben‑Gera (, Tiberian ʾĒhûḏ ben‑Gērāʾ) is described in the biblical Book of Judges as a judge who was sent by God to deliver the Israelites from Moabite domination.

Shophet

Suffetssuffetejudge
The stories follow a consistent pattern: the people are unfaithful to Yahweh and he therefore delivers them into the hands of their enemies; the people repent and entreat Yahweh for mercy, which he sends in the form of a leader or champion (a "judge"; see shophet); the judge delivers the Israelites from oppression and they prosper, but soon they fall again into unfaithfulness and the cycle is repeated.
See Book of Judges for more details.

Gideon

GedeoneGideon/JerubbaalGideon’s
Gideon (6–8) vs. Midian, Amalek, and the "children of the East" (apparently desert tribes)
Gideon or Gedeon, also named Jerubbaal, and Jerubbesheth, was a military leader, judge and prophet whose calling and victory over the Midianites are recounted in chapters 6 to 8 of the Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible.

Barak

Barak ben Avinoam
Deborah the prophetess, accompanied by Barak the army leader (4–5), vs. Jabin of Hazor (a city in Canaan) and Sisera, his captain
As military commander in the biblical Book of Judges, Barak, with Deborah, from the Tribe of Ephraim, the prophet and fourth Judge of pre-monarchic Israel, defeated the Canaanite armies led by Sisera.

Jephthah

JephthaJephteJephthah's Daughter
Jephthah (11–12:7) vs. the Ammonites
Jephthah (pronounced ; יפתח Yiftāḥ), appears in the Book of Judges as a judge who presided over Israel for a period of six years . According to Judges, he lived in Gilead.

Othniel

Othniel Ben Knazbiblical judgeCave of Othniel Ben Knaz
Othniel (3:9–11) vs. Chushan-Rishathaim, King of Aram; Israel has 40 years peace until the death of Othniel. (The statement that Israel has a certain period of peace after each judge is a recurrent theme.)
The historical reality of events described in the Book of Judges is the subject of ongoing dispute among scholars, who vary in their opinions about how much of the book is historical.

Book of Joshua

Joshuaconquest of Canaantribal allotments
In the narrative of the Hebrew Bible, it covers the time between the conquest described in the Book of Joshua and the establishment of a kingdom in the Books of Samuel, during which Biblical judges served as temporary leaders. Judges follows on from the Book of Joshua and opens with reference to Joshua's death (cf. ). The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges suggests that "the death of Joshua may be regarded as marking the division between the period of conquest and the period of occupation", the latter being the focus of the Book of Judges.
In the Book of Judges, the Books of Samuel, and the Books of Kings, the Israelites become faithless and God ultimately shows his anger by sending his people into exile.

Samson

Sampsonbiblical figureSamson and Delilah
Samson (13–16) vs. the Philistines
Samson (, Shimshon, "man of the sun") was the last of the judges of the ancient Israelites mentioned in the Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible (chapters 13 to 16) and one of the last of the leaders who "judged" Israel before the institution of the monarchy.

Elon (Judges)

Elon
There are also brief glosses on six minor judges: Shamgar (3:31), Tola and Jair (10:1–5), Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon (12:8–15).
In the Bible, Elon (or Ahialon in Douay–Rheims and some other translations) (Ahialon) is named in the Book of Judges as being a member of the Tribe of Zebulun who served as a judge of Israel for ten years, who followed Ibzan and was succeeded by Abdon.

Abdon (Judges)

Abdon
There are also brief glosses on six minor judges: Shamgar (3:31), Tola and Jair (10:1–5), Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon (12:8–15).
Abdon (Hebrew: עַבְדּוֹן ‘Aḇdōn, "servile" or "service"), was the son of Hillel, a Pirathonite, and was the twelfth Judge of Israel mentioned in the Book of Judges (Judges 12:13-15).

Abimelech (Judges)

AbimelechAbmilechKing Abimelech
Abimelech (9) (who is traditionally counted as a king not a judge, and is considered evil) vs. all the Israelites who oppose him
He is introduced in as the son of Gideon and his Shechemite concubine, and the biblical account of his reign is described in chapter nine of the Book of Judges.

Micah's Idol

Micah
Micah's Idol, how the tribe of Dan conquers its territory in the north
The narrative of Micah's Idol, recounted in the Book of Judges, concerns the Tribe of Dan, their conquest of Laish, and the sanctuary that was subsequently created there.

Chushan-Rishathaim

Cushan-Rishathaim
Othniel (3:9–11) vs. Chushan-Rishathaim, King of Aram; Israel has 40 years peace until the death of Othniel. (The statement that Israel has a certain period of peace after each judge is a recurrent theme.)
In the Book of Judges, God delivers the Israelites into his hand for eight years (Judges 3:8) as a punishment for polytheism.

Battle of Gibeah

attack the men of Benjaminbattlebattle at Gibeah
Battle of Gibeah, a war between Benjamin and the other tribes.
The Battle of Gibeah is an episode related in the Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible.