Book of Ruth

RuthElimelechRuth and NaomiThe Book of RuthRut (Ruth)Ruth the MoabiteBoaz and Rutheighth book of the Old TestamentLibrum RuthMegillas Rus
The Book of Ruth (abbreviated Rth) (מגילת רות, Megilath Ruth, "the Scroll of Ruth", one of the Five Megillot) is included in the third division, or the Writings (Ketuvim), of the Hebrew Bible; in most Christian canons it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel, as it is set "in the days when the judges judged",wikipedia
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Five Megillot

MegillotFive ScrollsMegilloth
The Book of Ruth (abbreviated Rth) (מגילת רות, Megilath Ruth, "the Scroll of Ruth", one of the Five Megillot) is included in the third division, or the Writings (Ketuvim), of the Hebrew Bible; in most Christian canons it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel, as it is set "in the days when the judges judged",
The Five Scrolls are the Song of Songs, the Book of Ruth, the Book of Lamentations, Ecclesiastes and the Book of Esther.

Boaz

Biblical figureBooz
The book is held in esteem by Jews who fall under the category of Jews-by-choice, as is evidenced by the considerable presence of Boaz in rabbinic literature.
Boaz (Modern Hebrew: בועז Bốʿaz; Massoretical Hebrew: בֹּ֫עַז Bṓʿaz; ) is a biblical figure appearing in the Book of Ruth in the Hebrew Bible and in the genealogies of Jesus in the New Testament and also the name of a pillar in the portico of the historic Temple in Jerusalem.

Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
The Book of Ruth (abbreviated Rth) (מגילת רות, Megilath Ruth, "the Scroll of Ruth", one of the Five Megillot) is included in the third division, or the Writings (Ketuvim), of the Hebrew Bible; in most Christian canons it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel, as it is set "in the days when the judges judged",

Ketuvim

WritingsHagiographaKetuvim ("Writings")
The Book of Ruth (abbreviated Rth) (מגילת רות, Megilath Ruth, "the Scroll of Ruth", one of the Five Megillot) is included in the third division, or the Writings (Ketuvim), of the Hebrew Bible; in most Christian canons it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel, as it is set "in the days when the judges judged",
The five relatively short books of Song of Songs, Book of Ruth, the Book of Lamentations, Ecclesiastes and Book of Esther are collectively known as the Hamesh Megillot (Five Megillot).

Conversion to Judaism

converted to Judaismconvertedconversion
The book is held in esteem by Jews who fall under the category of Jews-by-choice, as is evidenced by the considerable presence of Boaz in rabbinic literature.
(Many of the guidelines of accepting converts are based on the Book of Ruth and the manner whereby Ruth was brought into the fold through her mother-in-law, Naomi).

Mahlon and Chilion

ChilionMahlon
During the time of the judges, an Israelite family from Bethlehem – Elimelech, his wife Naomi, and their sons Mahlon and Chilion – emigrated to the nearby country of Moab.
Mahlon (מַחְלוֹן Maḥlōn) and Chilion (כִּלְיוֹן Ḵilyōn) were two brothers mentioned in the Book of Ruth.

Ruth (biblical figure)

RuthRuth the Moabitebiblical namesake
Elimelech died, and the sons married two Moabite women: Mahlon married Ruth and Chilion married Orpah.
Ruth, is the title character of the Book of Ruth.

Bethlehem

BetlehemBeth-lehemBethlehem District
During the time of the judges, an Israelite family from Bethlehem – Elimelech, his wife Naomi, and their sons Mahlon and Chilion – emigrated to the nearby country of Moab.
According to the Book of Ruth, the valley to the east is where Ruth of Moab gleaned the fields and returned to town with Naomi.

Ruth 1

1:4Ruth 1:16Ruth chapter 1
In Ruth 1:16–17, Ruth tells Naomi, her Israelite mother-in-law, "Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried. May the Lord deal with me, be it ever so severely, if even death separates you and me."
Ruth 1 is the first chapter of the Book of Ruth in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible, part of the Ketuvim ("Writings").

Orpah

biblical figure of that name
Elimelech died, and the sons married two Moabite women: Mahlon married Ruth and Chilion married Orpah.
Orpah (עָרְפָּה ʿorpā, meaning "neck" or "fawn") is a woman mentioned in the Book of Ruth in the Hebrew Bible.

Naomi (biblical figure)

NaomiNoemiMara
During the time of the judges, an Israelite family from Bethlehem – Elimelech, his wife Naomi, and their sons Mahlon and Chilion – emigrated to the nearby country of Moab. In Ruth 1:16–17, Ruth tells Naomi, her Israelite mother-in-law, "Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried. May the Lord deal with me, be it ever so severely, if even death separates you and me."
Naomi (Hebrew: Standard Hebrew Noʻomi, Tiberian Hebrew nåʿå̆mī) is Ruth's mother-in-law in the Hebrew Bible in the Book of Ruth.

Ruth 3

33:4Ruth 3:13
(3:4).
Ruth 3 is the third chapter of the Book of Ruth in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible, part of the Ketuvim ("Writings").

Shavuot

Feast of WeeksShavuosShavu'ot
The Book of Ruth also functions liturgically, as it is read during the Jewish holiday of Shavuot ("Weeks").
The Book of Ruth (, Megillat Ruth) is read on Shavuot because:

Ruth 4

Ruth 4:74ancestral genealogy
Ruth 4:7 notes for later generations that:
Ruth 4 is the fourth (and the last) chapter of the Book of Ruth in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible, part of the Ketuvim ("Writings").

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
The Book of Ruth (abbreviated Rth) (מגילת רות, Megilath Ruth, "the Scroll of Ruth", one of the Five Megillot) is included in the third division, or the Writings (Ketuvim), of the Hebrew Bible; in most Christian canons it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel, as it is set "in the days when the judges judged",
The five relatively short books of the Song of Songs, the Book of Ruth, the Book of Lamentations, Ecclesiastes and the Book of Esther are collectively known as the Hamesh Megillot (Five Megillot).

Gleaning

gleangleanersgleaned
The two women returned to Bethlehem at the beginning of the barley harvest, and in order to support her mother-in-law and herself, Ruth went to the fields to glean.
The Book of Ruth tells of gleaning by the widow Ruth to provide for herself and her mother-in-law, Naomi, who was also a widow.

Yibbum

levirate marriageDeuteronomy 25Yibum
He was therefore obliged by the Levirate law to marry Mahlon's widow, Ruth, in order to carry on his family's inheritance.
Another example of an analogous arrangement to yibbum is recounted in the Book of Ruth.

Jewish holidays

Jewish holidayYom Tovholidays
The Book of Ruth also functions liturgically, as it is read during the Jewish holiday of Shavuot ("Weeks").
During this holiday the Torah portion containing the Ten Commandments is read in the synagogue, and the biblical Book of Ruth is read as well.

List of placeholder names by language

Ploni Almonifulanohere
The relative is not named: Boaz addresses him as ploni almoni, literally "so and so".
The traditional terms are Ploni פלוני and his party Almoni אלמוני (originally mentioned in Ruth 4:1).

Tamar (Genesis)

TamarTamar and Judahbrother's wife
The book concludes with an appendix which traces the Davidic genealogy all the way back from Perez, "whom Tamar bore to Judah", through to Obed, down to David.
Perez is identified in the Book of Ruth as the ancestor of King David.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
The child is named Obed, who we discover is "the father of Jesse, the father of David" (Ruth 4:13–17), that is, the grandfather of King David.
While the Bible does not name his mother, the Talmud identifies her as Nitzevet, a daughter of a man named Adael, and the Book of Ruth claims him as the great-grandson of Ruth, the Moabite, by Boaz.

Perez (son of Judah)

PerezPharezPhares
The book concludes with an appendix which traces the Davidic genealogy all the way back from Perez, "whom Tamar bore to Judah", through to Obed, down to David.
The Book of Ruth lists Perez as being part of the ancestral genealogy of King David, and both the Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Luke include him when specifying the genealogy of Jesus.

Lesbian

lesbianismlesbiansSapphic
Feminists, for example, have recast the story as one of the dignity of labour and female self-sufficiency, and even as a model for lesbian relations, while others have seen in it a celebration of the relationship between strong and resourceful women.
In addition to Sappho's accomplishments, literary historian Jeannette Howard Foster includes the Book of Ruth, and ancient mythological tradition as examples of lesbianism in classical literature.

Genealogy of Jesus

Ancestors of ChristGenealogy of Christgenealogies of Jesus
Nolland suggests simply that these were all the known women attached to David's genealogy in the Book of Ruth.

Book of Judges

JudgesThe Book of JudgesShofetim
The Book of Ruth (abbreviated Rth) (מגילת רות, Megilath Ruth, "the Scroll of Ruth", one of the Five Megillot) is included in the third division, or the Writings (Ketuvim), of the Hebrew Bible; in most Christian canons it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel, as it is set "in the days when the judges judged",