Bookbinding

bookbinderbindingboundbook binding12mobookbindersfolioperfect boundspinequarto
Bookbinding is the process of physically assembling a book of codex format from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets.wikipedia
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Book

booksmonographbiblio
Bookbinding is the process of physically assembling a book of codex format from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets.
A book is a medium for recording information in the form of writing or images, typically composed of many pages (made of papyrus, parchment, vellum, or paper) bound together and protected by a cover.

Notebook

notepadlegal padnotepads
First, there was stationery binding (known as vellum binding in the trade) that deals with books intended for handwritten entries such as accounting ledgers, business journals, blank books, and guest log books, along with other general office stationery such as note books, manifold books, day books, diaries, portfolios, etc.
Principal types of binding are padding, perfect, spiral, comb, sewn, clasp, disc, and pressure, some of which can be combined.

Codex

codicesbook (Codex)codexes
Bookbinding is the process of physically assembling a book of codex format from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets.
The scholarly study of these manuscripts from the point of view of the bookbinding craft is called codicology.

St Cuthbert Gospel

Stonyhurst GospelSt. Cuthbert Gospel of St. JohnCuthbert Gospel of St John
The earliest surviving European bookbinding is the St Cuthbert Gospel of about 700, in red goatskin, now in the British Library, whose decoration includes raised patterns and coloured tooled designs.
Its finely decorated leather binding is the earliest known Western bookbinding to survive, and both the 94 vellum folios and the binding are in outstanding condition for a book of this age.

Treasure binding

clothed with gemsjeweled bindings
Very grand manuscripts for liturgical rather than library use had covers in metalwork called treasure bindings, often studded with gems and incorporating ivory relief panels or enamel elements.
A treasure binding or jewelled bookbinding is a luxurious book cover using metalwork in gold or silver, jewels or ivory, perhaps in addition to more usual bookbinding material for book-covers such as leather, velvet, or other cloth.

Vellum

vellum parchmentcalfskindrafting paper
First, there was stationery binding (known as vellum binding in the trade) that deals with books intended for handwritten entries such as accounting ledgers, business journals, blank books, and guest log books, along with other general office stationery such as note books, manifold books, day books, diaries, portfolios, etc.
Paper was used for most book-printing, as it was cheaper and easier to process through a printing press and to bind.

Letterpress printing

letterpressletterpress printerletterpress printers
Second was letterpress binding which deals with making books intended for reading, including library binding, fine binding, edition binding, and publisher's bindings.
Sheets for books are sent for bookbinding.

Library binding

Library Binding Instituterebinding
Second was letterpress binding which deals with making books intended for reading, including library binding, fine binding, edition binding, and publisher's bindings.
Most library binders use a method of bookbinding called oversewing to secure the volumes.

Pamphlet

pamphletsleafletleaflets
The evolution of the codex in China began with folded-leaf pamphlets in the 9th century AD, during the late Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD), improved by the 'butterfly' bindings of the Song dynasty (960-1279 AD), the wrapped back binding of the Yuan dynasty (1271-1368), the stitched binding of the Ming (1368-1644 AD) and Qing dynasties (1644-1912), and finally the adoption of Western-style bookbinding in the 20th century (coupled with the European printing press that replaced traditional Chinese printing methods).
A pamphlet is an unbound book (that is, without a hard cover or binding).

British Library

The British LibraryBLBritish Museum Library
The earliest surviving European bookbinding is the St Cuthbert Gospel of about 700, in red goatskin, now in the British Library, whose decoration includes raised patterns and coloured tooled designs.
Catalogue entries for many of the illuminated manuscript collections are available online, with selected images of pages or miniatures from a growing number of them, and there is a database of significant bookbindings.

Traditional Chinese bookbinding

Bookbinding in medieval Chinabutterfly bindingJapanese stab binding
Bookbinding in medieval China replaced traditional Chinese writing supports such as bamboo and wooden slips, as well as silk and paper scrolls.
Traditional Chinese bookbinding, also called stitched binding (Chinese: xian zhuang), is the method of bookbinding that the Chinese, Koreans, Japanese, and Vietnamese used before adopting the modern codex form.

Morgan Library & Museum

Morgan LibraryPierpont Morgan LibraryThe Morgan Library & Museum
The 8th century Vienna Coronation Gospels were given a new gold relief cover in about 1500, and the Lindau Gospels (now Morgan Library, New York) have their original cover from around 800.
It also contains a large collection of incunabula, prints, and drawings of European artists—Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough, Dürer, and Picasso; early printed Bibles, among them three Gutenberg Bibles; and many examples of fine bookbinding.

Anthropodermic bibliopegy

Books bound in human skinBound In Human Skinanthropodermic books
Anthropodermic bibliopegy is the practice of binding books in human skin.

Coptic binding

CopticCoptic sewingcoptic-bound
Coptic binding or Coptic sewing comprises methods of bookbinding employed by early Christians in Egypt, the Copts, and used from as early as the 2nd century AD to the 11th century.

Bradel binding

A Bradel binding (also called a bonnet or bristol board binding) is a style of book binding with a hollow back.

Limp binding

Limp vellumyapp
Limp binding is a bookbinding method in which the book has flexible cloth, leather, vellum, or (rarely) paper sides.

Hardcover

Hardbacktrade hardcoverHardbound
A hardcover, hardbound or hardback book has rigid covers and is stitched in the spine.
A hardcover or hardback (also known as hardbound, and sometimes as case-bound) book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of binder's board or heavy paperboard covered with buckram or other cloth, heavy paper, or occasionally leather).

Ethiopian binding

The Ethiopian bookbinding technique is a chain stitch sewing that looks similar to the multi section Coptic binding method.

Long-stitch bookbinding

Longstitch is a bookbinding technique used for sewing together the sections of a book.

Oversewn binding

Oversewingoversewn
Oversewn bindings are a type of bookbinding produced by sewing together loose leaves of paper to form a text block.

Wire binding

Double wire, twin loop, or Wire-O bindingmetal spine
Wire binding is a popular commercial book binding method, and is known by a number of different names including twin loop wire, wire-o, double loop wire, double-o, ring wire and wirebind.

Aldus Manutius

Aldo ManuzioAldusManutius
In the early sixteenth century, the Italian printer Aldus Manutius realized that personal books would need to fit in saddle bags and thus produced books in the smaller formats of quartos (one-quarter-size pages) and octavos (one-eighth-size pages).
Instructions for typesetters and binders were written in Greek, and the prefaces to Manutius's editions were also in Greek.

VeloBind

velo binding
VeloBind is a type of book binding often offered at copy and print shops.

Coil binding

Spiral bindingspiral boundspiral-bound
Coil binding, also known as spiral binding, is a commonly used book binding style for documents.

Leather

leather goodsdeerskinpigskin
A variation of the hardcover which is more durable is the calf-binding, where the cover is either half or fully clad in leather, usually from a calf.