Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuelBook of SamuelSecond Book of SamuelFirst Book of Samuel1 and 2 SamuelI SamuelII Samuel1 & 2 Samuel
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.wikipedia
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Nevi'im

Books of the ProphetsProphetsBook of the Prophets
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.
In Judaism, Samuel and Kings are each counted as one book.

Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.
The additional number reflects the splitting of several texts (Kings, Samuel and Chronicles, Ezra–Nehemiah and the minor prophets) into separate books in Christian bibles.

Book of Judges

JudgesShofetimBooks of Judges
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.
In the narrative of the Hebrew Bible, it covers the time between the conquest described in the Book of Joshua and the establishment of a kingdom in the Books of Samuel, during which Biblical judges served as temporary leaders.

Deuteronomist

Deuteronomistic historydeuteronomic historyDeuteronomistic historian
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.
Seen by most scholars more as a school or movement than a single author, Deuteronomistic material is found in the book of Deuteronomy, in the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings (the Deuteronomistic history, or DtrH), and also in the book of Jeremiah.

Eli (biblical figure)

EliEli Ha-Kohensame name
Eli, the priest of Shiloh (where the Ark of the Covenant is located), blesses her, and a child named Samuel is born.
Eli was, according to the Books of Samuel, a High Priest of Shiloh.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
But Saul proved unworthy and God's choice turned to David, who defeated Israel's enemies and brought the Ark to Jerusalem.
In the biblical narrative, David is a young shepherd who first gains fame as a musician and later by killing Goliath.

Hannah (biblical figure)

HannahAnnaChana (name)
The childless Hannah vows to Yahweh of hosts that if she has a son, he will be dedicated to him.
Hannah (undefined Ḥannāh "favor, grace") is one of the wives of Elkanah mentioned in the First Book of Samuel.

Saul

King Saulbattle of GilboaKing Saul of Israel
The story of the Ark of the Covenant that follows tells of Israel's oppression by the Philistines, which brought about Samuel's anointing of Saul as Israel's first king.
The biblical accounts of Saul's life are found in the Books of Samuel:

Philistines

PhilistinePhilistiaPeleset
The story of the Ark of the Covenant that follows tells of Israel's oppression by the Philistines, which brought about Samuel's anointing of Saul as Israel's first king. The Philistines capture the Ark of the Covenant from Shiloh and take it to the temple of their god Dagon, who recognizes the supremacy of Yahweh.
The Hebrew term occurs 286 times in the Masoretic Text of the Hebrew Bible (of which 152 times are in 1 Samuel).

Hophni and Phinehas

Phinehassons of Eli
Eli's sons, Hophni and Phinehas, prove unworthy of the priesthood and are killed in battle during the Battle of Aphek, but the child Samuel grows up "in the presence of the Lord."
The first book of Samuel describes them as the officiating priests at the sanctuary of Shiloh at the time of Hannah.

Shiloh (biblical city)

Shilohbiblical Shilohbiblical site
Eli, the priest of Shiloh (where the Ark of the Covenant is located), blesses her, and a child named Samuel is born.
Mentioned in the Books of Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, and Psalms, Shiloh is situated north of Bethel, east of the Bethel–Shechem highway, and south of Lebonah in the hill-country of Ephraim (Judg. 21:19).

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.
Shmû’ēl — Samuel

Gad (prophet)

GadGad the prophetGad the Seer
According to Jewish tradition, the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan.
He was one of the personal prophets of King David of Israel and, according to the Talmudic tradition, some of his writings are believed to be included in the Books of Samuel.

Ark of the Covenant

arkark of GodHoly Ark
Eli, the priest of Shiloh (where the Ark of the Covenant is located), blesses her, and a child named Samuel is born. The story of the Ark of the Covenant that follows tells of Israel's oppression by the Philistines, which brought about Samuel's anointing of Saul as Israel's first king.
The Ark is first mentioned in the Book of Exodus, and then numerous times in Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, I Samuel, II Samuel, I Kings, I Chronicles, II Chronicles, Psalms and Jeremiah.

Jonathan (1 Samuel)

JonathanJonathasYehonatan
Saul's son and heir Jonathan befriends David and recognizes him as the rightful king.
Jonathan (Hebrew: Yəhōnāṯān or Yehonatan; or Yonatan) is a heroic figure in 1 Samuel in the Hebrew Bible.

Battle of Aphek

Eli's sons, Hophni and Phinehas, prove unworthy of the priesthood and are killed in battle during the Battle of Aphek, but the child Samuel grows up "in the presence of the Lord."
Among biblical scholars, the historicity of the early events in the Book of Samuel is debated, with some scholars leaning toward many events in Samuel being historical, and some scholars leaning towards less.

Philistine captivity of the Ark

Philistine captivitycapture the Ark of the Covenantcaptured by the Philistines
The Philistines capture the Ark of the Covenant from Shiloh and take it to the temple of their god Dagon, who recognizes the supremacy of Yahweh.
According to 1 Samuel 4, prior to the battle the Ark had been residing at the ancient sanctuary of Shiloh, but was brought out by the Israelites in hope of victory in the war.

Nathan (prophet)

NathanNathan the prophetthe Biblical prophet Nathan
According to Jewish tradition, the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan.
His actions are described in the Books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles (especially, ).

Tamar (daughter of David)

TamarTamar, daughter of DavidThamar
Amnon (one of David's sons) rapes his half-sister Tamar (one of David's daughters).
Tamar is a figure described in 2 Samuel in the Hebrew Bible.

Tribe of Benjamin

BenjaminBenjamiteBenjamites
The Philistines are afflicted with plagues and return the ark to the Israelites, but to the territory of the tribe of Benjamin rather than to Shiloh.
The account in 2 Samuel 3 stresses that Israel's military commander Abner, negotiating with the tribes to secure a peace treaty with David, then king of Judah, held talks specifically with the house of Benjamin to secure their support.

Uriah the Hittite

UriahUriasher husband
When her husband, Uriah the Hittite returns from battle, David encourages him to go home and see his wife but Uriah declines in case David might need him.
Uriah the Hittite (אוּרִיָּה הַחִתִּֽי ’Ūrîyāh ha-Ḥittî) was a soldier in King David’s army mentioned in the biblical Second Book of Samuel.

Nazirite

NazariteNazirHe must not drink wine, wine mixtures, or wine vinegar
Samuel is dedicated to the Lord as a Nazirite – the only one besides Samson to be identified in the Bible.
Two examples of nazirites in the Hebrew Bible are Samson (Judges 13:5), and Samuel (1 Samuel 1:11).

Battle of the Wood of Ephraim

battle
Absalom is killed following the Battle of the Wood of Ephraim, David is restored as king, and he returns to his palace.
According to 2 Samuel, the Battle of the Wood of Ephraim was a military conflict between the rebel forces of the formerly exiled Israelite prince Absalom against the royal forces of his father king David during a short lived revolt.

Adonijah

Adonijafourth son of King David
Finally only two contenders for the succession remain, Adonijah, son of David and Haggith, and Solomon, son of David and Bathsheba.
According to 2 Samuel, Adonijah (’Ǎḏōnîyāh, "Yah is my lord") was the fourth son of King David.

Book of Joshua

Joshuaconquest of Canaantribal allotments
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.
In the Book of Judges, the Books of Samuel, and the Books of Kings, the Israelites become faithless and God ultimately shows his anger by sending his people into exile.