Bootable business card

business card-sized media
A bootable business card (BBC) is a CD-ROM that has been cut, pressed, or molded to the size and shape of a business card (designed to fit in a wallet or pocket).wikipedia
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CD-ROM

CDCD-ROM driveCD-ROM XA
A bootable business card (BBC) is a CD-ROM that has been cut, pressed, or molded to the size and shape of a business card (designed to fit in a wallet or pocket).
The most common size of CD-ROM is 120 mm in diameter, though the smaller Mini CD standard with an 80 mm diameter, as well as shaped compact discs in numerous non-standard sizes and molds (e.g., business card-sized media), are also available.

Damn Small Linux

Damn Small Linux, and last updated in 2005
More recently, the 50 MB Damn Small Linux can be put on BBCs.
It can be installed on storage media with small capacities, like bootable business cards, USB flash drives, various memory cards, and Zip drives.

Live CD

Live DVDLiveCDlive
A number of Linux distributions run from Live CDs, operating in a similar manner to a bootable business card, notably including the Knoppix and Ubuntu distributions.
The Linuxcare bootable business card, first released in 1999, was the first Live CD to focus on system administration, and the first to be distributed in the bootable business card form factor.

Business card

business cardscalling cardmembership card
A bootable business card (BBC) is a CD-ROM that has been cut, pressed, or molded to the size and shape of a business card (designed to fit in a wallet or pocket).

Credit card

credit cardscreditcredit-card
Alternative names for this form factor include "credit card," "hockey rink," and "wallet-size".

Ice hockey rink

hockey rinkrinkblue line
Alternative names for this form factor include "credit card," "hockey rink," and "wallet-size".

Wallet

walletsPursebillfold
Alternative names for this form factor include "credit card," "hockey rink," and "wallet-size".

Megabyte

MBmegabytesMbyte
The cards are designed to hold about 50 MB.

Trade fair

trade showtrade showsbook fair
The CD-ROM business cards are generally used for commercial product demos, are mailed to prospective customers, and are given away at trade shows.

Linux distribution

Linux distributionsdistributiondistributions
Although the term "bootable business card" could be applied to any bootable CD-ROM in the business card form factor, it almost always refers one which contains a compact Linux distribution generally containing a suite of system diagnostic and rescue tools and/or demos of specific packages.

LinuxWorld Conference and Expo

LinuxWorldLinuxWorld SummitLinux World
The premiere version was available at the first LinuxWorld Expo in San Jose, California.

San Jose, California

San JoseSan Jose, CASan José
The premiere version was available at the first LinuxWorld Expo in San Jose, California.

Open-source software

open sourceopen-sourceopen source software
Since the project consisted of open source and free software, and the idea was compelling and simple, a number of other Linux BBCs rapidly became available.

Free software

freefree-softwarefreely
Since the project consisted of open source and free software, and the idea was compelling and simple, a number of other Linux BBCs rapidly became available.

Linuxcare

LNX-BBC
In 1999 Linuxcare employee Duncan MacKinnon proposed the idea of producing and distributing such a card for an upcoming tradeshow.

Red Hat Linux

Red HatRHLBiltmore
At least one of the boxed Red Hat Linux packages included a system rescue CD in business card form factor. The early versions of the Linuxcare BBC were collections of packages that had been precompiled for other distributions (such as Debian and Red Hat Linux from which subsets of files were copied into the directory from which the BBC was "mastered" (the ISO 9660 CD images were built).

Personal computer

PCPCspersonal computers
Almost all of these run on PCs.

Debian

Debian GNU/LinuxDebian LinuxDebian Project
The early versions of the Linuxcare BBC were collections of packages that had been precompiled for other distributions (such as Debian and Red Hat Linux from which subsets of files were copied into the directory from which the BBC was "mastered" (the ISO 9660 CD images were built).

ISO 9660

ISO9660ISOCDFS
The early versions of the Linuxcare BBC were collections of packages that had been precompiled for other distributions (such as Debian and Red Hat Linux from which subsets of files were copied into the directory from which the BBC was "mastered" (the ISO 9660 CD images were built).

Golden ratio

golden sectiongolden meanφ
The first version of the LNX-BBC that was independent from Linuxcare was 1.618 (a number suggested by team member Seth Schoen, an approximation of the golden ratio, or phi, and a tribute to Donald Knuth who uses successively more precise approximations of π for versioning his TeX typesetting system).

Phi

ΦPhi (letter)Φ φ
The first version of the LNX-BBC that was independent from Linuxcare was 1.618 (a number suggested by team member Seth Schoen, an approximation of the golden ratio, or phi, and a tribute to Donald Knuth who uses successively more precise approximations of π for versioning his TeX typesetting system).

Donald Knuth

Donald E. KnuthKnuthDon Knuth
The first version of the LNX-BBC that was independent from Linuxcare was 1.618 (a number suggested by team member Seth Schoen, an approximation of the golden ratio, or phi, and a tribute to Donald Knuth who uses successively more precise approximations of π for versioning his TeX typesetting system).

Pi

ππ\pi
The first version of the LNX-BBC that was independent from Linuxcare was 1.618 (a number suggested by team member Seth Schoen, an approximation of the golden ratio, or phi, and a tribute to Donald Knuth who uses successively more precise approximations of π for versioning his TeX typesetting system).

TeX

TeX Users GroupTUGPlain TeX
The first version of the LNX-BBC that was independent from Linuxcare was 1.618 (a number suggested by team member Seth Schoen, an approximation of the golden ratio, or phi, and a tribute to Donald Knuth who uses successively more precise approximations of π for versioning his TeX typesetting system).