Bordeaux wine

BordeauxclaretBordeaux styleBordeaux winesBordeaux blendBordeaux regionBordeaux-styleBordelaisAquitaineBordeaux (or claret)
A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of southwest France.wikipedia
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Bordeaux

Bordeaux, FranceBurdigalaBordelais
Bordeaux is centered on the city of Bordeaux, on the Garonne River.
Bordeaux wine has been produced in the region since the 8th century.

Gironde

Gironde estuary33Gironde department
To the north of the city the Dordogne River joins the Garonne forming the broad estuary called the Gironde and covering the whole area of the Gironde department, with a total vineyard area of over 120,000 hectares, making it the largest wine growing area in France.
The Bordeaux wine region is in the Gironde.

Graves (wine region)

GravesGraves AOCSauternes
At this time, Graves was the principal wine region of Bordeaux, and the principal style was clairet.
Graves (, gravelly land) is an important subregion of the Bordeaux wine region.

Malbec

CôtCotagreste
Malbec was the dominant grape here, until the early 19th century, when it was replaced by Cabernet Sauvignon. Permitted grapes are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Malbec and rarely Carménère.
The grapes tend to have an inky dark color and robust tannins, and are known as one of the six grapes allowed in the blend of red Bordeaux wine.

Cabernet Sauvignon

CabernetBoucheCabernet-Sauvignon
Malbec was the dominant grape here, until the early 19th century, when it was replaced by Cabernet Sauvignon. Permitted grapes are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Malbec and rarely Carménère.
Cabernet Sauvignon became internationally recognized through its prominence in Bordeaux wines where it is often blended with Merlot and Cabernet Franc.

Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855

1855 Classification1855 Bordeaux classificationclassified
In 1855, the châteaux of Bordeaux were classified; this classification remains widely used today.
The Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855 resulted from the 1855 Exposition Universelle de Paris, when Emperor Napoleon III requested a classification system for France's best Bordeaux wines that were to be on display for visitors from around the world.

Wine

winesfine winewhite wine
A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of southwest France.
European wines tend to be classified by region (e.g. Bordeaux, Rioja and Chianti), while non-European wines are most often classified by grape (e.g. Pinot noir and Merlot).

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of southwest France.
Rosé wines are primarily consumed within the country, but Champagne and Bordeaux wines are major exports, being known worldwide.

Sauternes (wine)

SauternesBarsacBarsac AOC
The vast majority of wine produced in Bordeaux is red (sometimes called "claret" in Britain), with sweet white wines (most notably Sauternes), dry whites, and (in much smaller quantities) rosé and sparkling wines (Crémant de Bordeaux) collectively making up the remainder. White Bordeaux is predominantly, and exclusively in the case of the sweet Sauternes, made from Sémillon, Sauvignon blanc and Muscadelle.
While the English had been the region's primary export market since the Middle Ages, their tastes primarily ran to drier wines, starting with clairet in medieval times and eventually shifting to red claret.

Cabernet Franc

CabernetCabernet Franc (10%)Franc
Permitted grapes are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Malbec and rarely Carménère.
It is principally grown for blending with Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot in the Bordeaux style, but can also be vinified alone, as in the Loire's Chinon.

Merlot

White MerlotBini (grape)Higney
Permitted grapes are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Malbec and rarely Carménère.
Along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, Merlot is one of the primary grapes used in Bordeaux wine, and it is the most widely planted grape in the Bordeaux wine regions.

Clairet

At this time, Graves was the principal wine region of Bordeaux, and the principal style was clairet.
It is considered a specialty of the Bordeaux region and is thought to have originated in Quinsac in Premieres Côtes de Bordeaux.

Saint-Émilion AOC

Saint-ÉmilionSt-EmilionSt. Emilion
Merlot tends to predominate in Saint-Émilion, Pomerol and the other right bank appellations.
Saint-Émilion is an appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) for wine in the Bordeaux wine region of France, where it is situated in the Libourne subregion on the right bank of the Dordogne.

Carménère

CarmenereCarmenère
Permitted grapes are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Malbec and rarely Carménère.
Along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Malbec and Petit Verdot, Carménère is considered part of the original six red grapes of Bordeaux.

Bordeaux wine regions

Bordeaux wine regionBordeaux regionBordeaux
At this time, Graves was the principal wine region of Bordeaux, and the principal style was clairet. A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of southwest France.
The Graves is considered the birthplace of claret.

Merlot blanc

Other permitted grape varieties are Sauvignon gris, Ugni blanc, Colombard, Merlot blanc, Ondenc and Mauzac.
Merlot blanc is a white French wine grape variety that came from a natural crossing of the Bordeaux wine grape Merlot and the Cognac grape Folle blanche.

Meritage

Bordeaux-style blends
In 1988, a group of American vintners formed The Meritage Association to identify wines made in this way.
Meritage is a name for red and white Bordeaux-style wines without infringing on the Bordeaux (France) region's legally protected designation of origin.

Irrigation in viticulture

irrigationwater stressdrip irrigation
The Gironde estuary dominates the regions along with its tributaries, the Garonne and the Dordogne rivers, and together irrigate the land and provide an Atlantic Climate, also known as an oceanic climate, for the region.
Many maritime regions, such as Rias Baixas in Galicia, Bordeaux and the Willamette Valley in Oregon, suffer from the diametric problem of having too much rain during the growing season.

Ondenc

Irvine's white
Other permitted grape varieties are Sauvignon gris, Ugni blanc, Colombard, Merlot blanc, Ondenc and Mauzac.
In the 19th century, it was a popular planting in Bordeaux but fell out of favor following the phylloxera epidemic due to poor yields and sensitive to grape disease, though is still one of the seven permitted white varieties permitted in Bordeaux.

Pomerol AOC

PomerolPomerol estate
Pomerol is a French wine-growing commune and Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) within the Libournais ("Right Bank") in Bordeaux.

Sauvignon blanc

SauvignonFumé BlancFie (grape)
White Bordeaux is predominantly, and exclusively in the case of the sweet Sauternes, made from Sémillon, Sauvignon blanc and Muscadelle.
Dry and sweet white Bordeaux, including oak-aged examples from Pessac-Léognan and Graves, as well as some Loire wines from Pouilly-Fumé and Sancerre are some of the few examples of Sauvignon blancs with aging potential.

Muscadelle

Muscadelle du BordelaisTokayTokay (Muscadelle)
White Bordeaux is predominantly, and exclusively in the case of the sweet Sauternes, made from Sémillon, Sauvignon blanc and Muscadelle.
In France, it is a minor constituent in the dry and sweet wines of Bordeaux, such as Sauternes.

Classification of Saint-Émilion wine

1955 Official Classification of St.-ÉmilionClassified Growthformal classification in Saint-Émilion
In 1955 the wines of Saint-Émilion in the wine-growing region of Bordeaux were classified.

Sémillon

Semillongreen grapeGreen grape juice
White Bordeaux is predominantly, and exclusively in the case of the sweet Sauternes, made from Sémillon, Sauvignon blanc and Muscadelle.
Along with Sauvignon blanc and Muscadelle, Sémillon is one of only three approved white wine varieties in the Bordeaux region.

Château Pétrus

PétrusChateau PetrusPetrus
However some Pomerol wines, notably Château Pétrus and Château Le Pin, are often considered as being equivalent to the first growths of the 1855 classification, and often sell for even higher prices.
Pétrus is a Bordeaux, France, wine estate located in the Pomerol appellation near its eastern border to Saint-Émilion.