Clockwise from left:
1. The Executive Council Building burns after being hit by tank fire in Sarajevo.
2. May 1992; Ratko Mladić with Army of Republika Srpska officers.
3. A Norwegian UN peacekeeper in Sarajevo.
Ethnic map of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1991
Tuzla town, 1897
Serbian Autonomous Oblasts in November 1991
Tuzla Canton Government Building in flames during the 2014 unrest in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Carrington-Cutillero plan: Serbian cantons shown in red, Bosniak cantons in green, Croat cantons in blue
Tuzla valley (coal mines, lakes, airport)
Alija Izetbegović during his visit to the United States in 1997
A small bridge that indicates the crossing from the area of Korzo to the Pannonian lakes.
A victim of a mortar attack delivered to a Sarajevo hospital in 1992
Pannonian Lakes during winter time.
Goran Jelisić shooting a Bosnian Muslim in Brčko in 1992
Main park of Tuzla, located next to the Pannonian lakes and the area Korzo.
Model of the Čelebići camp, near Konjic, presented as evidence in the Mucić et al. trial
Statues of Meša Selimović and Ismet Mujezinović
Map of Operation Corridor 92, fought between the VRS and the HV-HVO
WizzAir, main airline, airplane taxiing after landing in Tuzla International Airport.
Bodies of people killed in April 1993 around Vitez.
Public fountain and city mosque
Novi Travnik in 1993, during the Croat–Bosniak War
Seal of Tuzla county, 1850–1923
Aerial photograph of destroyed buildings in Mostar
Seal of Tuzla town, 1850–1923
The front lines in the Lašva Valley in 1993 between the ARBiH and the HVO, including Novi Travnik, Vitez and Busovača
Tuzla salt mine, 1897
Damaged buildings in Grbavica during the Siege of Sarajevo
Third Yugoslav partisans' Corps marching through liberated Tuzla in October 1943.
UN troops on their way up "Sniper Alley" in Sarajevo
Yugoslav-time industrial plants in Tuzla
Bosnia and Herzegovina before the Dayton Agreement
Tuzla Power Plant
Seated from left to right: Slobodan Milošević, Alija Izetbegović and Franjo Tuđman signing the final peace agreement in Paris on 14 December 1995.
Work Affair and Residential building in the center square of Tuzla.
A grave digger at a cemetery in Sarajevo, 1992
High scale building at residential zone Stupine.
Bosnia and Herzegovina: Percent Change of Ethnic Bosniaks from 1991 to 2013
Business center, as well as the main Muslim Religious center.
Ethnic distribution at the municipal level in Bosnia and Herzegovina before (1991) and after the war (1998)
Trg Slobode
The cemetery at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery to Genocide Victims
WWII memorial
Exhumations in Srebrenica, 1996
Panoramic view of the Mellain Hotel building from the Pannonian Lakes.
The skull of a victim of the July 1995 Srebrenica massacre in an exhumed mass grave outside of Potočari, 2007
King Abdullah Bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud Mosque.
Mourners at the reburial ceremony for an exhumed victim of the Srebrenica massacre
A cemetery in Mostar flying the flag of Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (left), the flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the flag of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina

7,000 miners from Tuzla, Breza and Zenica in central Bosnia, participated in the strike in the village of Husino in Tuzla.

- Husino rebellion

In Bosnia and Herzegovina, Tuzla is also regarded as one of the most multicultural cities in the country and has managed to keep the pluralist character of the city throughout the Bosnian War and after, with Bosniaks, Serbs, Croats and a small minority of Bosnian Jews residing in Tuzla.

- Tuzla

The Husino uprising took place in 1920.

- Tuzla

During the Bosnian War (1992–95), a boot camp in Tuzla was named Husinska buna.

- Husino rebellion

However, in light of widespread NATO opposition to American (and possibly Turkish) endeavors in coordinating the "black flights of Tuzla", the United Kingdom and Norway expressed disapproval of these measures and their counterproductive effects on NATO enforcement of the arms embargo.

- Bosnian War

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