Bosporus

BosphorusBosphorus StraitBosphorousBosporus StraitIstanbul StraitBosphorosBosphorus StraitsBosporus StraitsBosporousBoğaziçi/İstanbul Boğazı
The Bosporus or Bosphorus (Ancient Greek: Βόσπορος Bosporos ; also known as the Strait of Istanbul; İstanbul Boğazı) is a narrow, natural strait and an internationally significant waterway located in northwestern Turkey.wikipedia
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Turkey

TurkishRepublic of TurkeyTUR
The Bosporus or Bosphorus (Ancient Greek: Βόσπορος Bosporos ; also known as the Strait of Istanbul; İstanbul Boğazı) is a narrow, natural strait and an internationally significant waterway located in northwestern Turkey.
East Thrace, the part of Turkey in Europe, is separated from Anatolia by the Sea of Marmara, the Bosphorous and the Dardanelles (collectively called the Turkish Straits).

Anatolia

Asia MinorAsiatic TurkeyAnatolian Plateau
It forms part of the continental boundary between Europe and Asia, and divides Turkey by separating Anatolia from Thrace.
The Sea of Marmara forms a connection between the Black and Aegean seas through the Bosphorus and Dardanelles straits and separates Anatolia from Thrace on the Balkan peninsula of Europe.

Aegean Sea

AegeanAegean coastAgean sea
It is the world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean seas.
In the north, the Aegean is connected to the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea by the straits of the Dardanelles and Bosphorus.

East Thrace

Eastern ThraceEuropean TurkeyTurkish Thrace
It forms part of the continental boundary between Europe and Asia, and divides Turkey by separating Anatolia from Thrace.
The largest city of the region is Istanbul, which straddles the Bosporus strait between Europe and Asia.

Black Sea

BlackEuxinePontus Euxinus
It is the world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean seas. One recent hypothesis, dubbed the Black Sea deluge hypothesis, which was launched by a study of the same name in 1997 by two scientists from Columbia University, postulates that the Bosporus was formed around 5600 BC when the rising waters of the Mediterranean Sea and the Sea of Marmara breached through to the Black Sea, which at the time, according to the hypothesis, was a low-lying body of fresh water.
It has a positive water balance; that is, a net outflow of water 300 km3 per year through the Bosphorus and the Dardanelles into the Aegean Sea.

Sea of Marmara

Marmara SeaPropontisMarmara
It is the world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean seas. One recent hypothesis, dubbed the Black Sea deluge hypothesis, which was launched by a study of the same name in 1997 by two scientists from Columbia University, postulates that the Bosporus was formed around 5600 BC when the rising waters of the Mediterranean Sea and the Sea of Marmara breached through to the Black Sea, which at the time, according to the hypothesis, was a low-lying body of fresh water.
The Bosphorus strait connects it to the Black Sea and the Dardanelles strait to the Aegean Sea.

Üsküdar

ChrysopolisScutariUskudar
The site where Io supposedly went ashore was near Chrysopolis (present-day Üsküdar), and was named Bous "the Cow".
Üsküdar, traditionally known in Italian and English as Scutari (, Σκουτάριον in Greek), is a large and densely populated district and municipality of Istanbul, Turkey, on the Anatolian shore of the Bosphorus.

Turkish Straits

StraitsBlack Sea StraitsStraits Question
Together with the Dardanelles, the Bosporus forms the Turkish Straits.
They consist of the Dardanelles and the Bosphorus.

Istanbul

İstanbulConstantinopleIstanbul, Turkey
Most of the shores of the strait are heavily settled, straddled by the city of Istanbul's metropolitan population of 17 million inhabitants extending inland from both coasts.
Istanbul is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, straddling the Bosporus strait (which separates Europe and Asia) between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea.

Dardanelles

HellespontDardanelles StraitÇanakkale Boğazı
It is the world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean seas. Together with the Dardanelles, the Bosporus forms the Turkish Straits.
One of the world's narrowest straits used for international navigation, the Dardanelles connects the Sea of Marmara with the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, while also allowing passage to the Black Sea by extension via the Bosphorus.

International waters

high seasinternational waterwaymare liberum
It is the world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean seas.

Chalcedon

Bishop of ChalcedonChalcedoniaTitular Bishop of Chalcedon
Other names by which the strait is referenced by Herodotus include Chalcedonian Bosporus (Bosporus Chalcedoniae, Bosporos tes Khalkedonies, Herodotus 4.87), or Mysian Bosporus (Bosporus Mysius).
The site of Chalcedon is located on a small peninsula on the north coast of the Sea of Marmara, near the mouth of the Bosphorus.

Symplegades

Clashing RocksDark RocksÖreke Taşı Islets
From the perspective of ancient Greek mythology, it was said that colossal floating rocks known as the Symplegades, or Clashing Rocks, once occupied the hilltops on both sides of the Bosporus, and destroyed any ship that attempted passage of the channel by rolling down the strait's hills and violently crushing all vessels between them.
The Symplegades (Συμπληγάδες, Symplēgádes) or Clashing Rocks, also known as the Cyanean Rocks, were, according to Greek mythology, a pair of rocks at the Bosphorus that clashed together whenever a vessel went through.

Rumeli Feneri

Rumelifeneri
The limits of the Bosporus are defined as the connecting line between the lighthouses of Rumeli Feneri and Anadolu Feneri in the north, and between the Ahırkapı Feneri and the Kadıköy İnciburnu Feneri in the south.
Rumeli Feneri, also Türkeli Feneri, a historical lighthouse still in use, is located on the European side of the Bosporus Strait's Black Sea entrance in Constantinople.

Golden Horn

Haliç HaliçAlibeyköy Creek
The Golden Horn is an estuary off the main strait that historically acted as a moat to protect Old Istanbul from attack, as well as providing a sheltered anchorage for the imperial navies of various empires until the 19th century, after which it became a historic neighborhood at the heart of the city, popular with tourists and locals alike.
The Golden Horn (Altın Boynuz;, Chrysókeras; Sinus Ceratinus), also known by its modern Turkish name, Haliç, is a major urban waterway and the primary inlet of the Bosphorus in Istanbul, Turkey.

Anadolu Feneri

Anadolufeneri
The limits of the Bosporus are defined as the connecting line between the lighthouses of Rumeli Feneri and Anadolu Feneri in the north, and between the Ahırkapı Feneri and the Kadıköy İnciburnu Feneri in the south.
Anadolu Feneri is a historical lighthouse still in use, which is located on the Asian side of Bosphorus' Black Sea entrance in Istanbul, Turkey.

Ahırkapı Feneri

Ahırkapı Lighthouse
The limits of the Bosporus are defined as the connecting line between the lighthouses of Rumeli Feneri and Anadolu Feneri in the north, and between the Ahırkapı Feneri and the Kadıköy İnciburnu Feneri in the south.
The Ahırkap Feneri, a historical lighthouse still in use, is located at the southern Seraglio Point on the Rumelian coast of Bosporus' south entrance, in Ahırkapı neighborhood of Istanbul's Fatih district, Turkey.

Kadıköy İnciburnu Feneri

The limits of the Bosporus are defined as the connecting line between the lighthouses of Rumeli Feneri and Anadolu Feneri in the north, and between the Ahırkapı Feneri and the Kadıköy İnciburnu Feneri in the south.
The Kadıköy İnciburnu Feneri (aka Kadıköy Feneri or İnciburnu Feneri) is a lighthouse located at the head of Kadıköy Harbor's İnciburnu Breakwater on the Anatolian coast of Bosporus' south entrance, in Kadıköy district of Istanbul, Turkey.

Prosphorion Harbour

ProsphorionGate of Eugeniusthe most ancient northern harbour
The 12th century Greek scholar John Tzetzes calls it Damaliten Bosporon (after Damalis), but he also reports that in popular usage the strait was known as Prosphorion during his day, the name of the most ancient northern harbour of Constantinople.
The first harbour to be built in Constantinople's area during the time when it was the city-state of Byzantium lay on the Golden Horn, at the entrance of the Bosporus, in the angle formed by the sea and the end of Byzantium's walls, corresponding with the future Byzantine quarter named "ta Eugeniou" after the Gate of Eugenius of the sea wall (the Ottoman Yaliköşkü kapısı).

Mediterranean Sea

MediterraneanMediterranean coastWestern Mediterranean
It is the world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean seas. One recent hypothesis, dubbed the Black Sea deluge hypothesis, which was launched by a study of the same name in 1997 by two scientists from Columbia University, postulates that the Bosporus was formed around 5600 BC when the rising waters of the Mediterranean Sea and the Sea of Marmara breached through to the Black Sea, which at the time, according to the hypothesis, was a low-lying body of fresh water.

Black Sea deluge hypothesis

Black Sea deluge theoryBlack Sea delugeBlack Sea flood
One recent hypothesis, dubbed the Black Sea deluge hypothesis, which was launched by a study of the same name in 1997 by two scientists from Columbia University, postulates that the Bosporus was formed around 5600 BC when the rising waters of the Mediterranean Sea and the Sea of Marmara breached through to the Black Sea, which at the time, according to the hypothesis, was a low-lying body of fresh water.
The rising Mediterranean finally spilled over a rocky sill at the Bosporus.

Bebek, Beşiktaş

BebekBebek, Istanbul
The depth of the Bosporus varies from 13 to 110 m in midstream with an average of 65 m. The deepest location is between Kandilli and Bebek with 110 m. The shallowest locations are off Kadıköy İnciburnu on the northward route with 18 m and off Aşiyan Point on the southward route with 13 m.
It is located on Bebek Bay along the European shores of the Bosphorus strait and is surrounded by similarly affluent neighbourhoods such as Arnavutköy, Etiler and Rumeli Hisarı.

Kandilli, Üsküdar

KandilliKandilli PointKandilli, Istanbul
Its maximum width is 3420 m between Umuryeri and Büyükdere Limanı, and minimum width 700 m between Kandilli Point and Aşiyan.
It lies on the Asian bank of Bosphorus and is home to some of Istanbul's in-city forests.

Io (mythology)

IoIo mythologymyth of Io
This is in reference to the mythological story of Io, who was transformed into a cow, and was subsequently condemned to wander the Earth until she crossed the Bosporus, where she met the Titan Prometheus, who comforted her with the information that she would be restored to human form by Zeus and become the ancestress of the greatest of all heroes, Heracles (Hercules).
Io eventually crossed the path between the Propontis and the Black Sea, which thus acquired the name Bosporus (meaning ox passage), where she met Prometheus, who had been chained on Mt. Caucasus by Zeus.

Histories (Herodotus)

HistoriesThe Histories(The) Histories
These are expressed in Herodotus' Histories, 4.83; as Bosporus Thracius, Bosporus Thraciae, and Βόσπορος Θρᾴκιος, respectively.