Boston Symphony Orchestra

Boston SymphonyBostonThe BostonBoston Symphony Chamber PlayersBoston Symphony Orchestra (BSO)Boston Symphony String QuartetBSOSymphonySymphony Orchestra
The Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) is an American orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts.wikipedia
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Henry Lee Higginson

founderHenry L. HigginsonLee-Higginson
The BSO was founded in 1881 by Henry Lee Higginson.
Henry Lee Higginson (November 18, 1834 - November 14, 1919) was the founder of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Andris Nelsons

Andris Nelsons is the current music director of the BSO.
He is currently the music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Gewandhauskapellmeister of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra.

Seiji Ozawa

OzawaOzawa Seiji
Bernard Haitink currently holds the title of conductor emeritus of the BSO, and Seiji Ozawa has the title of BSO music director laureate.
Seiji Ozawa is a Japanese conductor known for his advocacy of modern composers and for his work with the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Big Five (orchestras)

Big FiveBig Five" symphony orchestrasleading American orchestra
It is one of the five major American symphony orchestras commonly referred to as the "Big Five".
Boston Symphony Orchestra (1881)

Symphony Hall, Boston

Symphony HallBoston Symphony HallBoston's Symphony Hall
Founded in 1881, the BSO plays most of its concerts at Boston's Symphony Hall and in the summer performs at Tanglewood.
Designed by McKim, Mead and White, it was built in 1900 for the Boston Symphony Orchestra, which continues to make the hall its home.

Tanglewood

Tanglewood Music CenterTanglewood Music FestivalBerkshire Music Center
Founded in 1881, the BSO plays most of its concerts at Boston's Symphony Hall and in the summer performs at Tanglewood. Under Koussevitzky, the orchestra gave regular radio broadcasts and established its summer home at Tanglewood, where Koussevitzky founded the Berkshire Music Center, which is now the Tanglewood Music Center.
It has been the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra since 1937.

Karl Muck

He offered the position to Hans Richter in February 1905, who declined, to Felix Mottl in November, who was previously engaged, and then to previous director Nikisch, who declined; the post was finally offered to Karl Muck, who accepted and began his duties in October 1906.
His American career comprised two stints at the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Bernard Haitink

Haitink
Bernard Haitink currently holds the title of conductor emeritus of the BSO, and Seiji Ozawa has the title of BSO music director laureate.
Haitink served as principal guest conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1995 to 2004, when he took on the new title of conductor emeritus.

Serge Koussevitzky

KoussevitzkyKoussevitskySerge
The orchestra's reputation increased during the music directorship of Serge Koussevitzky.
Serge Alexandrovich Koussevitzky (Серге́й Алекса́ндрович Кусеви́цкий; Sergey Aleksandrovich Kusevitsky; July 26 1874 – June 4, 1951) was a Russian-born conductor, composer and double-bassist, known for his long tenure as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1924 to 1949.

Pierre Monteux

MonteuxMonteux, Pierre
The BSO's next two titled conductors were French: Henri Rabaud, who took over from Muck for a season, and then Pierre Monteux from 1919 to 1924.
He led the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1919–24), Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra (1924–34), Orchestre Symphonique de Paris (1929–38) and San Francisco Symphony (1936–52).

Symphony in B minor (Paderewski)

Symphony in B minor "PoloniaSymphony in B minorSymphony "Polonia
He conducted the premiere of Ignacy Jan Paderewski's Symphony in B minor "Polonia" in 1909.
Its public premiere was with the Boston Symphony Orchestra under the German conductor Max Fiedler, on 12 February 1909.

Tanglewood Music Center

Berkshire Music CenterTanglewoodBerkshire Music Centre
Under Koussevitzky, the orchestra gave regular radio broadcasts and established its summer home at Tanglewood, where Koussevitzky founded the Berkshire Music Center, which is now the Tanglewood Music Center.
The Center operates as a part of the Tanglewood Music Festival, an outdoor concert series and the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO).

Symphony of Psalms

Koussevitzky also commissioned many new pieces from prominent composers, including the Symphony No. 4 of Sergei Prokofiev, George Gershwin's Second Rhapsody and the Symphony of Psalms by Igor Stravinsky.
The work was commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Concerto for Orchestra (Bartók)

Concerto for OrchestraBartokBartok's Concerto for Orchestra
They also gave the premiere of Béla Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra, which had been commissioned by the Koussevitzky Music Foundation at the instigation of Fritz Reiner and Joseph Szigeti.
It was premiered on December 1, 1944, in Symphony Hall, Boston, by the Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Serge Koussevitzky.

Henri Rabaud

Rabaud
The BSO's next two titled conductors were French: Henri Rabaud, who took over from Muck for a season, and then Pierre Monteux from 1919 to 1924.
In 1918 he became musical director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra for only one season before returning to Paris.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
The Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) is an American orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts.
The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the "Big Five," a group of the greatest American orchestras, and the classical music magazine Gramophone called it one of the "world's best" orchestras.

Elliott Carter

CarterCarter, Elliott[Elliott] Carter
Koussevitzky started a tradition of commissions that the orchestra continued, including new works by Heitor Villa-Lobos (Symphony No. 11) and Henri Dutilleux for its 75th anniversary, Roger Sessions, and Andrzej Panufnik, for the 100th, and lately for the 125th works by Leon Kirchner, Elliott Carter, and Peter Lieberson.
In 1924, a 15-year-old Carter was in the audience when Pierre Monteux conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) in the New York première of The Rite of Spring.

Arthur Nikisch

Artur NikischNikischArtúr Nikisch
The orchestra's four subsequent music directors were all trained in Austria, including the seminal and highly influential Hungarian-born conductor Arthur Nikisch, in accordance with the tastes of Higginson.
Nikisch later became conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and from 1893 to 1895 director of the Royal Opera in Budapest.

Doriot Anthony Dwyer

In 1952, Munch appointed the first woman to hold a principal chair in a major U.S. orchestra, flutist Doriot Anthony Dwyer, who remained as BSO principal for 38 years.
She was the principal flute for the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1952 until 1990.

Charles Munch (conductor)

Charles MunchCharles MünchMunch
Although Koussevitsky recommended his protégé Leonard Bernstein to be his successor after he retired in 1949, the BSO awarded the position to the Alsatian maestro Charles Munch.
Noted for his mastery of the French orchestral repertoire, he was best known as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Symphony No. 2 (Corigliano)

Symphony No. 2Symphony No. 2 for String Orchestra
Other BSO commissions have included John Corigliano's Symphony No. 2 for the 100th anniversary of Symphony Hall.
John Corigliano's Symphony No. 2 for Orchestra was commissioned by the Boston Symphony Orchestra to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Symphony Hall.

Leonard Bernstein

BernsteinBernstein, LeonardBernstein, L.
Although Koussevitsky recommended his protégé Leonard Bernstein to be his successor after he retired in 1949, the BSO awarded the position to the Alsatian maestro Charles Munch.
(Bernstein in German = Amber in English.) In 1940, Bernstein began his study at the Boston Symphony Orchestra's summer institute, Tanglewood, in the conducting class of the orchestra's conductor, Serge Koussevitzky.

George Henschel

Georg HenschelSir George Henschel
Its first conductor was George Henschel, who was a noted baritone as well as conductor, and a close friend of Johannes Brahms.
He became the first conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1881 (he used the name "Georg Henschel"); on his appointment, he sent his ideas for an innovative seating chart to Brahms, who replied and commented in an approving letter of mid-November 1881.

Colin Davis

Sir Colin DavisColin Rex DavisDavis, Colin
After Steinberg's retirement, according to BSO trustee John Thorndike (who was on the search committee) the symphony's board spoke to Colin Davis and "investigated very thoroughly" his appointment, but Davis's commitments to his young family did not allow his moving to Boston from England; instead he accepted the post of BSO principal guest conductor, which he held from 1972 to 1984.
His guest conductorships included the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic and the Dresden Staatskapelle, among many others.

Max Fiedler

The music director 1908–12 was Max Fiedler.
In 1908 Karl Muck, then the conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, recommended Fiedler as his successor as conductor of the orchestra, and he was duly appointed, having already appeared in the United States during 1905, when he had conducted the New York Philharmonic Orchestra alongside Willem Mengelberg and a year before the guest appearance of a German conductor noted for his Brahms, Fritz Steinbach.