Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea PartyTea Partytea was thrown into the harborBostonBoston HarborBoston Tea Party of 1773Civil disobedienceconsigned the tea to the water in Boston harbordestroying a shipment of teadumped the tea into the harbour
The Boston Tea Party was a political and mercantile protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1773.wikipedia
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Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
The Boston Tea Party was a political and mercantile protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1773.
It was the scene of several key events of the American Revolution, such as the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Battle of Bunker Hill, and the Siege of Boston.

Direct action

non-violent direct actiondirect actionsNonviolent direct action
The Boston Tea Party was a political and mercantile protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1773.
In this essay, de Cleyre points to historical examples such as the Boston Tea Party and the American anti-slavery movement, noting that "direct action has always been used, and has the historical sanction of the very people now reprobating it."

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
The British government responded harshly and the episode escalated into the American Revolution.
Protests steadily escalated to the Boston Massacre in 1770 and the burning of the Gaspee in Rhode Island in 1772, followed by the Boston Tea Party in December 1773.

Townshend Acts

Townsend ActsTownshend ActTownshend duties
The target was the Tea Act of May 10, 1773, which allowed the British East India company to sell tea from China in American colonies without paying taxes apart from those imposed by the Townshend Acts.
The Townshend Acts' taxation on imported tea was enforced once again by the Tea Act of 1773, and this led to the Boston Tea Party in 1773 in which Bostonians destroyed a shipment of taxed tea.

Boston Harbor

Boston HarbourNantasket RoadsBoston Bay
They boarded the ships and threw the chests of tea into the Boston Harbor.
It was the site of the Boston Tea Party, as well as almost continuous building of wharves, piers, and new filled land into the harbor until the 19th century.

Tea Party movement

Tea PartyTea PartiersTea Party activist
The Tea Party became an iconic event of American history, and since then other political protests such as the Tea Party movement have referred to themselves as historical successors to the Boston protest of 1773.
The movement's name refers to the Boston Tea Party of December 16, 1773, a watershed event in the launch of the American Revolution.

Tea Act

Tea Act of 1773tea taxTea Act 1773
The target was the Tea Act of May 10, 1773, which allowed the British East India company to sell tea from China in American colonies without paying taxes apart from those imposed by the Townshend Acts.
In Boston, this resistance culminated in the Boston Tea Party on December 16, 1773, when colonists (some disguised as Native Americans, since they identified themselves as “Americans” and no longer considered themselves British subjects ) boarded tea ships anchored in the harbour and dumped their tea cargo overboard.

Intolerable Acts

Coercive Actsactsamong other actions
Parliament responded in 1774 with the Intolerable Acts, or Coercive Acts, which, among other provisions, ended local self-government in Massachusetts and closed Boston's commerce.
The Intolerable Acts were punitive laws passed by the British Parliament in 1774 after the Boston Tea Party.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The crisis escalated, and the American Revolutionary War began near Boston in 1775.
Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
Colonists up and down the Thirteen Colonies in turn responded to the Intolerable Acts with additional acts of protest, and by convening the First Continental Congress, which petitioned the British monarch for repeal of the acts and coordinated colonial resistance to them.
It met from September 5 to October 26, 1774 at Carpenters' Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania after the British Navy instituted a blockade of Boston Harbor and Parliament passed the punitive Intolerable Acts in response to the December 1773 Boston Tea Party.

Boston Port Act

Boston Port Billact of the British parliament to blockade the port of Bostonblockade of Boston Harbor
Parliament responded in 1774 with the Intolerable Acts, or Coercive Acts, which, among other provisions, ended local self-government in Massachusetts and closed Boston's commerce.
It was one of five measures (variously called the Intolerable Acts, the Punitive Acts or the Coercive Acts) that were enacted during the spring of 1774 to punish Boston for the Boston Tea Party.

Petition to the King

petitioned the kingPetition to the King (1774)petitioned Parliament
Colonists up and down the Thirteen Colonies in turn responded to the Intolerable Acts with additional acts of protest, and by convening the First Continental Congress, which petitioned the British monarch for repeal of the acts and coordinated colonial resistance to them.
After colonists destroyed thousands of pounds of British-taxed tea during the Boston Tea Party, Parliament passed the Coercive Acts in 1774, punishing the colonies for their actions.

East India Company

British East India CompanyHonourable East India CompanyEnglish East India Company
The target was the Tea Act of May 10, 1773, which allowed the British East India company to sell tea from China in American colonies without paying taxes apart from those imposed by the Townshend Acts.
This led to the Boston Tea Party in which protesters boarded British ships and threw the tea overboard.

Province of Massachusetts Bay

MassachusettsMassachusetts BayProvince of Massachusetts
The Boston Tea Party was a political and mercantile protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1773.
Colonists stormed ships in the harbor and dumped the cargo of tea into the water, and the protest came to be known as the Boston Tea Party.

No taxation without representation

taxation without representationwithout representationa lack of colonial representation
Colonists objected to the Tea Act because they believed that it violated their rights as Englishmen to "no taxation without representation", that is, to be taxed only by their own elected representatives and not by a British parliament in which they were not represented.
The Americans rejected the Stamp Act of 1765 brought in by British Prime Minister George Grenville, and violently rejected the remaining tax on tea imports, under the Tea Act passed in May 1773, at the Boston Tea Party on December 16, 1773.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
Colonists up and down the Thirteen Colonies in turn responded to the Intolerable Acts with additional acts of protest, and by convening the First Continental Congress, which petitioned the British monarch for repeal of the acts and coordinated colonial resistance to them.
Trouble escalated over the tea tax, as Americans in each colony boycotted the tea, and those in Boston dumped the tea in the harbor during the Boston Tea Party in 1773 when the Sons of Liberty dumped thousands of pounds of tea into the water.

Philadelphia Tea Party

returned to England with its cargo
By early December, the Philadelphia consignees had resigned and the tea ship returned to England with its cargo following a confrontation with the ship's captain.
The Philadelphia Tea Party was an incident in late December 1773, shortly after the more famous Boston Tea Party, in which a British tea ship was intercepted by American colonists and forced to return its cargo to Great Britain.

Samuel Adams

Sam AdamsSamuelAdams
Samuel Adams considered the British tea monopoly to be "equal to a tax" and to raise the same representation issue whether or not a tax was applied to it.
Continued resistance to British policy resulted in the 1773 Boston Tea Party and the coming of the American Revolution.

Thomas Hutchinson (governor)

Thomas HutchinsonGovernor Thomas HutchinsonHutchinson
Protesters had successfully prevented the unloading of tea in three other colonies, but in Boston, embattled Royal Governor Thomas Hutchinson refused to allow the tea to be returned to Britain. Dutied British tea continued to be imported into Boston, however, especially by Richard Clarke and the sons of Massachusetts Governor Thomas Hutchinson, until pressure from Massachusetts Whigs compelled them to abide by the non-importation agreement.
When the twenty-day deadline arrived on 16 December, protestors (some in Indian disguise) boarded the ships that night and dumped the tea into the harbour.

Old South Meeting House

Old South ChurchOld SouthThird Church
Thousands of people arrived, so many that the meeting was moved to the larger Old South Meeting House.
It gained fame as the organizing point for the Boston Tea Party on December 16, 1773.

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIGeorge III of Great Britain
The North ministry's solution was the Tea Act, which received the assent of King George on May 10, 1773.
In 1773, the tea ships moored in Boston Harbor were boarded by colonists and the tea thrown overboard, an event that became known as the Boston Tea Party.

Richard Clarke (merchant)

Richard ClarkeRichard
Dutied British tea continued to be imported into Boston, however, especially by Richard Clarke and the sons of Massachusetts Governor Thomas Hutchinson, until pressure from Massachusetts Whigs compelled them to abide by the non-importation agreement.
Jonathan was in London in 1773 and Richard Clarke & Sons were named as factors for the Honourable East India Company and were among the consignees of the tea which was thrown into Boston Harbor in December of that year, in the Boston Tea Party.

George Robert Twelves Hewes

George HewesGeorge R.T. Hewees
This began to change in the 1830s, however, especially with the publication of biographies of George Robert Twelves Hewes, one of the few still-living participants of the "tea party", as it then became known.
George Robert Twelves Hewes (August 25, 1742 – November 5, 1840) was a participant in the political protests in Boston at the onset of the American Revolution, and one of the last survivors of the Boston Tea Party and the Boston Massacre.

Peggy Stewart (ship)

Peggy StewartPeggy Stewart'' (ship)Peggy Stuart
A number of colonists were inspired by the Boston Tea Party to carry out similar acts, such as the burning of Peggy Stewart.
Peggy Stewart was a Maryland cargo vessel burned on October 19, 1774, in Annapolis as a punishment for contravening the boycott on tea imports which had been imposed in retaliation for the British treatment of the people of Boston following the Boston Tea Party.

Frederick North, Lord North

Lord NorthFrederick North, 2nd Earl of GuilfordFrederick North
Parliament finally responded to the protests by repealing the Townshend taxes in 1770, except for the tea duty, which Prime Minister Lord North kept to assert "the right of taxing the Americans".
Following the Boston Tea Party in 1773, Lord North proposed a number of legislative measures which were supposed to punish the Bostonians.