A report on Choir and Boy soprano

Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls
The general vocal range of an adult female soprano is C4–C6 (highlighted), with notes unreachable by an average Treble marked in red (B5–C6).
Egyptian Alexandria Jewish choir of Rabbin Moshe Cohen at Samuel Menashe synagogue, Alexandria, Egypt
The boychoir Cantores Minores in the Helsinki Cathedral in 2013
Lambrook School choir in the 1960s, a typical boys' school choir of the time
One possible layout
Choir in front of the orchestra
Relief, now in Athens, showing Dionysus with actresses (possibly from The Bacchae) carrying masks and drums
Church singing, Tacuinum Sanitatis Casanatensis (14th century)
Luca della Robbia's Cantoria, Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Florence
Baroque cantata with one voice per part

Early breaking of boys' voices due to puberty becoming earlier in recent times is causing a serious problem for choirmasters.

- Boy soprano

Male choir (or choir of men & boys) with the same SATB voicing as a mixed choir, but with boys singing the upper part (often called trebles or boy sopranos) and men singing alto (in falsetto), also known as countertenors. This format is typical of the British cathedral choir (e.g. King's College, St Paul's, Westminster Abbey).

- Choir
Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls

5 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Soprano vocal range (C4–C6) notated on the treble staff and on piano keyboard in green with dot marking middle C

Soprano

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Type of classical female singing voice and has the highest vocal range of all voice types.

Type of classical female singing voice and has the highest vocal range of all voice types.

Soprano vocal range (C4–C6) notated on the treble staff and on piano keyboard in green with dot marking middle C

The soprano's vocal range (using scientific pitch notation) is from approximately middle C (C4) = 261 Hz to "high A" (A5) = 880 Hz in choral music, or to "soprano C" (C6, two octaves above middle C) = 1046 Hz or higher in operatic music.

"Soprano" refers mainly to women, but it can also be applied to men; "sopranist" is the term for a male countertenor able to sing in the soprano vocal range, while a castrato is the term for a castrated male singer, typical of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries, and a treble is a boy soprano who has not reached puberty yet and still able to sing in that range.

Alto vocal range, F3 to F5, notated on the treble staff (left) and on piano keyboard in green with the yellow key marking middle C

Alto

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The musical term alto, meaning "high" in Italian (Latin: altus), historically refers to the contrapuntal part higher than the tenor and its associated vocal range.

The musical term alto, meaning "high" in Italian (Latin: altus), historically refers to the contrapuntal part higher than the tenor and its associated vocal range.

Alto vocal range, F3 to F5, notated on the treble staff (left) and on piano keyboard in green with the yellow key marking middle C

In 4-part voice leading alto is the second highest part, sung in choruses by either low women's or high men's voices.

The explanation for the anomaly of this name is to be found not in the use of adult falsettists in choirs of men and boys but further back in innovations in composition during the mid-15th century.

A parish church choir at All Saints' Church, Northampton; singers wear traditional cassock, surplice and ruff and stand in facing rows of Decani and Cantoris in the choir stalls

Anglican church music

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Music that is written for Christian worship in Anglican religious services, forming part of the liturgy.

Music that is written for Christian worship in Anglican religious services, forming part of the liturgy.

A parish church choir at All Saints' Church, Northampton; singers wear traditional cassock, surplice and ruff and stand in facing rows of Decani and Cantoris in the choir stalls
A choir singing choral evensong in York Minster
Four members of the Westminster Abbey Choir at the Coronation of James II in 1685.
A Village Choir, an 1847 painting by Thomas Webster, showing the musicians of a country parish church at that time.
The choir at Aberford, near Leeds, West Yorkshire, in the early 20th century.

It mostly consists of pieces written to be sung by a church choir, which may sing a cappella or accompanied by an organ.

An Anglican choir typically uses "SATB" voices (soprano or treble, alto or counter-tenor, tenor, and bass), though in many works some or all of these voices are divided into two for part or all of the piece; in this case the two halves of the choir (one on each side of the aisle) are traditionally named decani and cantoris which sing, respectively, Choir 1 and Choir 2 in two-choir music.

Portrait of Joseph Haydn by Thomas Hardy (1791)

Joseph Haydn

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Austrian composer of the Classical period.

Austrian composer of the Classical period.

Portrait of Joseph Haydn by Thomas Hardy (1791)
St. Stephen's Cathedral. In the foreground is the Kapellhaus (demolished 1804) where Haydn lived as a chorister.
Map showing locations where Haydn lived or visited
Morzin Palace, Dolní Lukavice, Czech Republic
Haydn's wife. Unauthenticated miniature attributed to Ludwig Guttenbrunn
Prince Nikolaus Esterházy, Haydn's most important patron
View of Eszterháza
Portrait by Ludwig Guttenbrunn, painted c. 1791–92, depicts Haydn c. 1770
Hanover Square Rooms, principal venue of Haydn's performances in London
Haydn as portrayed by John Hoppner in England in 1791
Wax sculpture of Haydn by Franz Thaler, c. 1800
House in Vienna (now a museum) where Haydn spent the last years of his life
Bergkirche in Eisenstadt, site of Haydn's tomb
Haydn's signature on a work of music: di me giuseppe Haydn ("by me Joseph Haydn"). He writes in Italian, a language he often used professionally.
Laus Deo ("praise be to God") at the conclusion of a Haydn manuscript.
Haydn on a 1950 20 Austrian schilling banknote
Original copy of "Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser" in Haydn's hand
Joseph Haydn Playing Quartets

The people of Hainburg heard him sing treble parts in the church choir.

Voice change

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A voice change or voice mutation, sometimes referred to as a voice break or voice crack, commonly refers to the deepening of the voice of people as they reach puberty.

A voice change or voice mutation, sometimes referred to as a voice break or voice crack, commonly refers to the deepening of the voice of people as they reach puberty.

Unchanged voices were in high demand for church choirs, which historically excluded women.

The British cathedral choir ideal remains based on boy sopranos (or trebles), with the alto part executed by adult countertenors.