Brandenburg-Prussia

BrandenburgPrussiaBrandenburgianprince-elector of BrandenburgPrussianBrandenburg-PreußenBrandenburg-PrussianBrandenburgerDuchy of PrussiaElectorate of Brandenburg
Brandenburg-Prussia (Brandenburg-Preußen; Brannenborg-Preußen) is the historiographic denomination for the Early Modern realm of the Brandenburgian Hohenzollerns between 1618 and 1701.wikipedia
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House of Hohenzollern

HohenzollernHohenzollernsHohenzollern dynasty
Brandenburg-Prussia (Brandenburg-Preußen; Brannenborg-Preußen) is the historiographic denomination for the Early Modern realm of the Brandenburgian Hohenzollerns between 1618 and 1701.
The Hohenzollern family split into two branches, the Catholic Swabian branch and the Protestant Franconian branch, which ruled the Burgraviate of Nuremberg and later became the Brandenburg-Prussian branch.

Province of Pomerania (1653–1815)

Province of PomeraniaPomeraniaBrandenburgian Pomerania
By the Peace of Westphalia, which ended the Thirty Years' War in 1648, Brandenburg gained Minden and Halberstadt, also the succession in Farther Pomerania (incorporated in 1653) and the Duchy of Magdeburg (incorporated in 1680). Sweden retained the western part including the lower Oder (Swedish Pomerania), while Brandenburg gained the eastern part (Farther Pomerania).
The Province of Pomerania was a province of Brandenburg-Prussia, the later Kingdom of Prussia.

Margraviate of Brandenburg

BrandenburgElectorate of BrandenburgMarch of Brandenburg
Brandenburg-Prussia (Brandenburg-Preußen; Brannenborg-Preußen) is the historiographic denomination for the Early Modern realm of the Brandenburgian Hohenzollerns between 1618 and 1701. Based in the Electorate of Brandenburg, the main branch of the Hohenzollern intermarried with the branch ruling the Duchy of Prussia, and secured succession upon the latter's extinction in the male line in 1618.
The resulting Brandenburg-Prussia was the predecessor of the Kingdom of Prussia, which became a leading German state during the 18th century.

Principality of Halberstadt

HalberstadtPrince of Halberstadt
By the Peace of Westphalia, which ended the Thirty Years' War in 1648, Brandenburg gained Minden and Halberstadt, also the succession in Farther Pomerania (incorporated in 1653) and the Duchy of Magdeburg (incorporated in 1680).
The Principality of Halberstadt (Fürstentum Halberstadt) was a state of the Holy Roman Empire ruled by Brandenburg-Prussia.

Second Northern War

Northern WarsSecond NorthernNorthern War
With the Treaty of Bromberg (1657), concluded during the Second Northern War, the electors were freed of Polish vassalage for the Duchy of Prussia and gained Lauenburg–Bütow and Draheim.
The Second Northern War (1655–60, also First or Little Northern War) was fought between Sweden and its adversaries the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1655–60), the Moscow Tsardom (1656–58), Brandenburg-Prussia (1657–60), the Habsburg Monarchy (1657–60) and Denmark–Norway (1657–58 and 1658–60).

Prussian Army

Royal Prussian ArmyPrussianArmy
The emerging Brandenburg-Prussian military potential, based on the introduction of a standing army in 1653, was symbolized by the widely noted victories in Warsaw (1656) and Fehrbellin (1675) and by the Great Sleigh Drive (1678).
It became vital to the development of Brandenburg-Prussia as a European power.

Draheim

Drahim CountyDrahimStarostwo Drahimskie
With the Treaty of Bromberg (1657), concluded during the Second Northern War, the electors were freed of Polish vassalage for the Duchy of Prussia and gained Lauenburg–Bütow and Draheim.
Pawned to Brandenburg-Prussia in 1657, it was directly incorporated into the Kingdom of Prussia in 1772.

Battle of Fehrbellin

Fehrbellindefeated at Fehrbellin1675 battle
The emerging Brandenburg-Prussian military potential, based on the introduction of a standing army in 1653, was symbolized by the widely noted victories in Warsaw (1656) and Fehrbellin (1675) and by the Great Sleigh Drive (1678).
The Battle of Fehrbellin was fought on June 18, 1675 (Julian calendar date, June 28th, Gregorian), between Swedish and Brandenburg-Prussian troops.

Duchy of Prussia

Ducal PrussiaPrussiaDuke of Prussia
Based in the Electorate of Brandenburg, the main branch of the Hohenzollern intermarried with the branch ruling the Duchy of Prussia, and secured succession upon the latter's extinction in the male line in 1618. This was made possible by the Duchy of Prussia's sovereign status outside the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, and approval by the Habsburg emperor and other European royals in the course of forming alliances for the War of the Spanish succession and the Great Northern War.
The duchy was inherited by the Hohenzollern prince-electors of Brandenburg in 1618; this personal union is referred to as Brandenburg-Prussia.

Prussia

PrussianPrussian statePrussian army
The second half of the 17th century laid the basis for Prussia to become one of the great players in European politics.
The union of Brandenburg and the Duchy of Prussia in 1618 led to the proclamation of the Kingdom of Prussia in 1701.

List of former German colonies

colonial periodGerman coloniesformer German colonies
Brandenburg-Prussia also established a navy and German colonies in the Brandenburger Gold Coast and Arguin.
This is a list of former German colonies and protectorates (Schutzgebiete) established by the German Empire, Brandenburg-Prussia and the Habsburg Monarchy.

Great Sleigh Drive

The Great Sleigh Drive
The emerging Brandenburg-Prussian military potential, based on the introduction of a standing army in 1653, was symbolized by the widely noted victories in Warsaw (1656) and Fehrbellin (1675) and by the Great Sleigh Drive (1678).
"The Great Sleigh Drive" (Die große Schlittenfahrt) was a daring and bold maneuver by Frederick William, the Great Elector of Brandenburg-Prussia, to drive Swedish forces out of the Duchy of Prussia, a territory of his which had been invaded by the Swedes during the winter of 1678.

Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussian court
From 1701 onward, the Hohenzollern domains were referred to as the Kingdom of Prussia, or simply Prussia.
Prussia was a great power from the time it became a kingdom, through its predecessor, Brandenburg-Prussia, which became a military power under Frederick William, known as "The Great Elector".

Great Northern War

Great Nordic WarNorthern WarThe Great Northern War
This was made possible by the Duchy of Prussia's sovereign status outside the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, and approval by the Habsburg emperor and other European royals in the course of forming alliances for the War of the Spanish succession and the Great Northern War.
George I of Great Britain and of Electorate of Hanover joined the coalition in 1714 for Hanover and in 1717 for Britain, and Frederick William I of Brandenburg-Prussia joined it in 1715.

Frederick I of Prussia

Frederick IFrederick IIIFrederick III of Brandenburg
In 1701, Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, succeeded in elevating his status to King in Prussia.
Frederick I (Friedrich I.; 11 July 1657 – 25 February 1713), of the Hohenzollern dynasty, was (as Frederick III) Elector of Brandenburg (1688–1713) and Duke of Prussia in personal union (Brandenburg-Prussia).

Bishopric of Minden

MindenBishop of MindenAuxiliary Bishop of Minden
By the Peace of Westphalia, which ended the Thirty Years' War in 1648, Brandenburg gained Minden and Halberstadt, also the succession in Farther Pomerania (incorporated in 1653) and the Duchy of Magdeburg (incorporated in 1680). In the Peace of Westphalia, Frederick William was compensated for Western Pomerania with the secularized bishoprics of Halberstadt and Minden and the right of succession to the likewise secularized Archbishopric of Magdeburg.
Since 1719, Minden prince-bishopric was administered by Brandenburg-Prussia together with the adjacent County of Ravensberg as Minden-Ravensberg.

King in Prussia

Kings in PrussiaKingKing ''in'' Prussia
In 1701, Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, succeeded in elevating his status to King in Prussia.
The dual state was known unofficially as Brandenburg-Prussia.

Brandenburg–Pomeranian conflict

Brandenburg-Pomeranian conflicta long-standing disputea long-standing dispute regarding the status of the latter
The Brandenburgian margraves had long sought to expand northwards, connecting land-locked Brandenburg to the Baltic Sea.
Brandenburg would by then have naturally have prevailed, but this was hindered by the contemporary Swedish occupation of Pomerania, and the conflict continued between Sweden and Brandenburg-Prussia until 1815, when Prussia incorporated Swedish Pomerania into her Province of Pomerania.

Edict of Potsdam

1685French refugeesJean Harlan
Frederick William, known as "The Great Elector", opened Brandenburg-Prussia to large-scale immigration ("Peuplierung") of mostly Protestant refugees from all across Europe ("Exulanten"), most notably Huguenot immigration following the Edict of Potsdam.
The western part of Brandenburg-Prussia fell within the empire: badly depopulated, the territory faced a desperate labour shortage during the second half of the seventeenth century.

Duchy of Cleves

ClevesCount of ClevesCounty of Cleves
Another consequence of the intermarriage was the incorporation of the lower Rhenish principalities of Cleves, Mark and Ravensberg after the Treaty of Xanten in 1614.
Finally incorporated into Brandenburg-Prussia by the Great Elector Frederick William I of Brandenburg in 1666 and part of the Kingdom of Prussia after 1701, Cleves was occupied by French forces in the Seven Years' War (1757–62).

Pomerania during the Early Modern Age

conquered it in a four-year campaignEarly Modern AgeHouse of Pomerania became extinct
Some of the territories gained after the war were likewise devastated: in Pomerania, only one third of the population survived, and Magdeburg, once among the wealthiest cities of the empire, was burned down with most of the population slain.
In the Peace of Westphalia of 1648, the Swedish Empire and Brandenburg-Prussia agreed on a partition of the duchy, which came into effect after the Treaty of Stettin (1653).

Swedish Pomerania

PomeraniaSwedenSwedish
Sweden retained the western part including the lower Oder (Swedish Pomerania), while Brandenburg gained the eastern part (Farther Pomerania). In the Peace of Westphalia, Frederick William was compensated for Western Pomerania with the secularized bishoprics of Halberstadt and Minden and the right of succession to the likewise secularized Archbishopric of Magdeburg.
These areas were ceded to Brandenburg-Prussia and were integrated into Brandenburgian Pomerania.

Archbishopric of Magdeburg

Archbishop of MagdeburgMagdeburgPrince-Archbishopric of Magdeburg
In the Peace of Westphalia, Frederick William was compensated for Western Pomerania with the secularized bishoprics of Halberstadt and Minden and the right of succession to the likewise secularized Archbishopric of Magdeburg.
Then Brandenburg-Prussia acquired Magdeburg prince-archbishopric, and after being secularised, transformed it into the Duchy of Magdeburg, a hereditary monarchy in personal union with Brandenburg.

Franco-Dutch War

Dutch WarFranco–Dutch WarFrench
In 1672, the Franco-Dutch War broke out, with Brandenburg-Prussia involved as an ally of the Dutch Republic.
By late July, the Dutch position had stabilised, with support from Emperor Leopold, Brandenburg-Prussia and Spain; this was formalised in the August 1673 Treaty of the Hague, joined by Denmark in January 1674.

Lauenburg and Bütow Land

Lauenburg and BütowLauenburgLauenburg-Bütow Land
With the Treaty of Bromberg (1657), concluded during the Second Northern War, the electors were freed of Polish vassalage for the Duchy of Prussia and gained Lauenburg–Bütow and Draheim.
After the 1657 Treaty of Bydgoszcz (Bromberg) that amended the previous Treaty of Wehlau it was granted as a fief to the Hohenzollern dynasty of Brandenburg-Prussia in return for her help against Sweden in the Swedish-Polish War under the same favourable conditions the Griffins had enjoyed before.