NASA landsat photo of Cape Breton Island
Bras d'Or Lake
Philippe de Pastour de Costebelle, 1st Governor of Île Royale, only known image of a French Governor
Sunset over Bras d'Or Lake in Irish Cove, Nova Scotia, in September 2015
Siege of Louisbourg (1758)
West Bay in early summer
Samuel Waller Prentice, 84th Regiment, 4 January 1780, shipwrecked off Cape Breton, Nova Scotia by Robert Pollard (1784)
Ocean-going ships enter and exit the Bras d'Or Lake system via Great Bras d'Or, spanned by the Seal Island Bridge
The former Congregation Sons of Israel synagogue, in Glace Bay. In 1902, the synagogue was Nova Scotia's first purpose-built synagogue. It permanently closed in July 2010. To the left is the also closed Talmud Torah community centre. This was the location of the Hebrew school and functions like Bar Mitzvah and wedding dinners.
Passenger steamer on Bras d'Or Lake near New Campbellton, ca 1903.
Cape Breton Island's most recognizable and commonly used flag
The East Bay Regatta, held the last weekend in July since 1984, features races and other social events. As many as 40 boats participate.
Cape Breton Island's "Eagle" flag (1994)
Cape Breton Island's second cultural flag, the "Tartan" flag (early 1990s)
Cape Breton Island's first cultural flag, the blue-and-yellow flag, dates to the 1940s.
Cabot's Landing, Victoria County, commemorating the "first land seen" by explorer John Cabot in 1497
The shoreline of Bras d'Or Lake at Marble Mountain, Inverness Co.
A bulk carrier in the Strait of Canso docked at the Martin Marietta Materials quarry at Cape Porcupine
Cape Breton Highlands National Park
Smelt Brook on the northern shore
Entering Cape Breton Island from Canso Causeway
Seal Island Bridge in Victoria County, the 3rd-longest in Nova Scotia
Sydney Harbour with Point Edward, Westmount, and downtown Sydney visible

Bras d'Or Lake (Mi'kmawi'simk: Pitupaq) is an irregular estuary in the centre of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada.

- Bras d'Or Lake

These efforts resulted in the first powered flight in Canada when the AEA Silver Dart took off from the ice-covered waters of Bras d'Or Lake.

- Cape Breton Island
NASA landsat photo of Cape Breton Island

7 related topics

Alpha

Bell c. undefined 1917

Alexander Graham Bell

Scottish-born inventor, scientist and engineer who is credited with patenting the first practical telephone.

Scottish-born inventor, scientist and engineer who is credited with patenting the first practical telephone.

Bell c. undefined 1917
Melville House, the Bells' first home in North America, now a National Historic Site of Canada
Bell, top right, providing pedagogical instruction to teachers at the Boston School for Deaf Mutes, 1871. Throughout his life, he referred to himself as "a teacher of the deaf".
Alexander Graham Bell's telephone patent drawing, March 7, 1876
The master telephone patent, 174465, March 7, 1876
An actor playing Bell in a 1926 film holds Bell's first telephone transmitter
Bell at the opening of the long-distance line from New York to Chicago in 1892
Alexander Graham Bell, his wife Mabel Gardiner Hubbard, and their daughters Elsie (left) and Marian ca. 1885
The Brodhead–Bell mansion, the Bell family residence in Washington, D.C., from 1882 to 1889
Alexander Graham Bell in his later years
Photophone receiver, one half of Bell's wireless optical communication system, ca. 1880
Bell's HD-4 on a test run ca. 1919
AEA Silver Dart ca. 1909
Bell statue by A. E. Cleeve Horne in front of the Bell Telephone Building of Brantford, Ontario, The Telephone City. (Brantford Heritage Inventory, City of Brantford)
A quote by Alexander Graham Bell engraved in the stone wall within the Peace Chapel of the International Peace Garden (in Manitoba Canada and North Dakota, USA).
The Bell Museum, Cape Breton, part of the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site
A.G. Bell issue of 1940
Bell, an alumnus of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, receiving an honorary Doctor of Laws degree (LL.D.) at the university in 1906

That summer, the Bells had a vacation on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, spending time at the small village of Baddeck.

Returning in 1886, Bell started building an estate on a point across from Baddeck, overlooking Bras d'Or Lake.

Baddeck

Village in northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada.

Village in northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada.

Women workers at Bell's shipyard
Victoria County Court House
Telegraph House
Old post office and customs house
Alexander and Mabel Bell statue

It is situated in the centre of Cape Breton, where the Baddeck River empties into Bras d'Or Lake.

St. Peter's, Nova Scotia

Monument on the site of Denys' post at Saint-Pierre. The south entrance to the Canal is in the background.
Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville
Closeup of plaque on Denys' monument.
Monument marking location of Laurence Kavanagh's home, St. Peter's, Nova Scotia

St. Peter's (Scottish Gaelic: Baile Pheadair; formerly known as "Santo Pedro", "Saint-Pierre", "Port Toulouse", and "St. Peters") is a small incorporated village located on Cape Breton Island in Richmond County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

This village is located on a narrow isthmus which separates the southern end of Bras d'Or Lake, known as St. Peter's Inlet, to the north from St. Peter's Bay on the Atlantic Ocean to the south.

St. Peters Canal

At the St. Peter's Canal lock each lock gate consists of four swinging doors which form a diamond shape when closed. In actual use the pair of doors which form the upstream pointing 'V' are used. No matter which side has the higher water level, either one pair or the other will be appropriate.
Steamer "Marion" Entering the First Locks on St. Peter's Canal, cir.1890
Jerome Point Lighthouse

The St. Peters Canal is a small shipping canal located in eastern Canada on Cape Breton Island.

It crosses an isthmus in the village of St. Peter's, Nova Scotia which connects St. Peters Inlet of Bras d'Or Lake to the north with St. Peters Bay of the Atlantic Ocean to the south.

The view of Aspy Bay's North, Middle & South Harbours, the Aspy Fault and the Cape Breton Highlands from the South Lookoff of the Wilkie Sugar Loaf trail.

Cape Breton Highlands

The view of Aspy Bay's North, Middle & South Harbours, the Aspy Fault and the Cape Breton Highlands from the South Lookoff of the Wilkie Sugar Loaf trail.

The Cape Breton Highlands (Plateau du Cap-Breton, Àrd-thalamh Cheap Bhreatainn), commonly called the Highlands, refer to a highland or mountainous plateau across the northern part of Cape Breton Island in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.

The Highlands are surrounded by water with the Atlantic Ocean on the east, the Cabot Strait to the north and east, the Gulf of St. Lawrence on the north and west, and Bras d'Or Lake to the south.

Cape Breton Regional Municipality

Mi'kmaq camp in Sydney, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia photographed by Paul-Émile Miot in 1857.
Reserve Colliery 1900
Aerial view of Sydney Harbour
CBRM Council Chambers in City Hall, Sydney, Nova Scotia
Cape Breton Regional Municipality welcome sign
NASA landsat photo of Cape Breton Island
J.A. McCurdy Airport
Marine Atlantic ferry Blue Puttees
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Great Hall of Cape Breton University
Rita MacNeil performing at the National Arts Centre in 2009
Centre 200, Sydney, Nova Scotia

Cape Breton Regional Municipality (often referred to as simply "CBRM") is the Canadian province of Nova Scotia's second largest municipality and the economic heart of Cape Breton Island.

Nearby attractions such as the Cape Breton Highlands, Bras d'Or Lake and Fortress of Louisbourg have made Cape Breton Island a tourism destination for many years.

A Miꞌkmaw father and child at Tufts Cove, Nova Scotia, around 1871

Miꞌkmaq

The Miꞌkmaq (also Mi'gmaq, Lnu, Miꞌkmaw or Miꞌgmaw; ; ) are a First Nations people of the Northeastern Woodlands, indigenous to the areas of Canada's Atlantic Provinces and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec as well as the northeastern region of Maine.

The Miꞌkmaq (also Mi'gmaq, Lnu, Miꞌkmaw or Miꞌgmaw; ; ) are a First Nations people of the Northeastern Woodlands, indigenous to the areas of Canada's Atlantic Provinces and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec as well as the northeastern region of Maine.

A Miꞌkmaw father and child at Tufts Cove, Nova Scotia, around 1871
Chief Gabriel Sylliboy - first to fight for Treaty Rights in the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, 1929
The Holy Mary Rosary prayer in Mi'kmaq hieroglyphics by Christian Kauder, 1866
Miꞌkmaꞌki: Divided into seven districts. Not shown is Taqamgug/Tagamuk, the eighth district that includes the entire island of Newfoundland. Taqamgug was historically part of Onamag before the 1800s.
Miꞌkmaq Women Selling Baskets, Halifax, Nova Scotia, by Mary R. McKie c. 1845
Miꞌkmaw Encampment by Hibbert Newton Binney, c.1791
Monument to the Treaty of 1752, Shubenacadie First Nation, Nova Scotia
Miꞌkmaq making hockey sticks from hornbeam trees (Ostrya virginiana) in Nova Scotia about 1890.
A dancer in the Miꞌkmaq celebration
Grand Chief Jacques-Pierre Peminuit Paul (3rd from left with beard) meets Governor General of Canada, Marquess of Lorne, Red Chamber, Province House, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1879.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.rct.uk/collection/search|title=Explore the Royal Collection Online|website=www.rct.uk}}</ref>
Miꞌkmaq encampment, Sydney, Cape Breton Island
Miꞌkmaq People (1873)
Miꞌkmaq people (1865)
Maliseet, Passamaquoddy
Eastern Abenaki (Penobscot, Kennebec, Arosaguntacook, Pigwacket/Pequawket
Western Abenaki (Arsigantegok, Missisquoi, Cowasuck, Sokoki, Pennacook

The grand chief was a title given to one of the district chiefs, who was usually from the Miꞌkmaw district of Unamáki or Cape Breton Island.

Traditionally, the Grand Council met on a small island, Mniku, on the Bras d'Or lake in Cape Breton.