Brass Era car

1905 Jackson Model C
A Royal Tourist model US Army vehicle, circa 1906. The vehicle was the conveyance of General Frederick Funston (leftmost figure in the back seat).
A 1911 K-R-I-T advertisement
A Stanley Steamer racecar in 1903; in 1906, a similar Stanley Rocket set the world land speed record at 205.5 km/h (127.6 mi/h) at Daytona Beach Road Course.

American term for the early period of automotive manufacturing, named for the prominent brass fittings used during this time for such things as lights and radiators.

- Brass Era car

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Chicago

Most populous city in the U.S. state of Illinois, and the third-most populous city in the United States, following New York City and Los Angeles.

Traditional Potawatomi regalia on display at the Field Museum of Natural History
An artist's rendering of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871
Court of Honor at the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893
Men outside a soup kitchen during the Great Depression (1931)
Boy from Chicago, 1941
Protesters in Grant Park outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention
Downtown and the North Side with beaches lining the waterfront
A satellite image of Chicago
Community areas of the City of Chicago
The Chicago Building (1904–05) is a prime example of the Chicago School, displaying both variations of the Chicago window.
Replica of Daniel Chester French's Statue of the Republic at the site of the World's Columbian Exposition
Downtown Chicago and the Chicago River during January 2014 cold wave
Map of racial distribution in Chicago, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
The Chicago Board of Trade Building
The National Hellenic Museum in Greektown is one of several ethnic museums comprising the Chicago Cultural Alliance.
A Chicago jazz club
The Chicago Theatre
The spire of the Copernicus Center is modeled on the Royal Castle in Warsaw.
Jay Pritzker Pavilion by night
Ferries offer sightseeing tours and water-taxi transportation along the Chicago River and Lake Michigan.
Aerial view of Navy Pier at night
The Magnificent Mile hosts numerous upscale stores, as well as landmarks like the Chicago Water Tower.
Chicago-style stuffed pizza
A Polish market in Chicago
Carl Sandburg's most famous description of the city is as "Hog Butcher for the World/Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat/ Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler,/ Stormy, Husky, Brawling, City of the Big Shoulders."
Chicago Half Marathon on Lake Shore Drive on the South Side
Daley Plaza with Picasso statue, City Hall in background. At right, the Daley Plaza Building contains the state law courts.
Chicago Police Department SUV, 2011
When it was opened in 1991, the central Harold Washington Library appeared in Guinness World Records as the largest municipal public library building in the world.
The University of Chicago, as seen from the Midway Plaisance
WGN began in the early days of radio and developed into a multi-platform broadcaster, including a cable television super-station.
The former Harpo Studios in West Loop, Chicago was home of The Oprah Winfrey Show from 1986 until 2011 and other Harpo Production operations until 2015.
Aerial photo of the Jane Byrne Interchange, opened in the 1960s
Chicago Union Station, opened in 1925, is the third-busiest passenger rail terminal in the United States.
Amtrak train on the Empire Builder route departs Chicago from Union Station
O'Hare International Airport
Prentice Women's Hospital on the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Downtown Campus

Late in the 19th century, Chicago was part of the bicycle craze, with the Western Wheel Company, which introduced stamping to the production process and significantly reduced costs, while early in the 20th century, the city was part of the automobile revolution, hosting the Brass Era car builder Bugmobile, which was founded there in 1907.

Rochet-Schneider

French company, based in Lyons, that produced automobiles between 1894 and 1932.

early Rochet-Schneider
1914 Rochet-Schneider

Like other motorcars of the Brass Era, the cars made by Rochet-Schneider were largely intended for wealthy hobbyists and made use of brass fittings, pattern leather, hand-crafted wood and other expensive components.

Elmore Manufacturing Company

1908 Elmore Model 40
1908 Elmore at Crawford museum in Cleveland

Elmore Manufacturing Company was a manufacturer of veteran and brass era automobiles and bicycles (1893–97), headquartered at 504 Amanda Street, Clyde, Ohio, from 1893 until 1912.

Pope-Toledo

Pope-Toledo Tonneau 1904
Pope C/60 V 1907
1907 Pope-Toledo Type XV Touring
Advertisement and images of the Pope Motor Car Company in Toledo, Ohio, 1905

The Pope-Toledo was one of the makes of the Pope Motor Car Company founded by Colonel AA Pope, and was a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles in Toledo, Ohio between 1903 and 1909.

Haynes-Apperson

1903 phaeton
1894 Haynes-Apperson
1904 newspaper advertisement

Haynes-Apperson Company was a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles in Kokomo, Indiana, from 1896 to 1905.

Yale (automobile)

Yale car, 1903
Kirk Manufacturing Company - The Yale Touring Car - 1904

Kirk Manufacturing Company was a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles in Toledo, Ohio from 1901 to 1905.

Pope-Waverley

A 1903 Waverley Electric Road Wagon in the Tellus Science Museum
1910 Waverley Coupe.

Pope-Waverley was one of the brands of the Pope Motor Car Company founded by Albert Augustus Pope and was a manufacturer of Brass Era electric automobiles in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Duryea Power

1905 Jackson Model C

Duryea Power Company was a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles in Reading, Pennsylvania.

Northern (automobile)

Northern Runabout 1902

Northern Manufacturing Company was a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles in Detroit, Michigan, automobiles designed by Charles Brady King.

Pope-Robinson

Pope-Robinson was part of the Pope automobile group of companies founded by Colonel Albert Pope manufacturing Brass Era automobiles in Hyde Park, Massachusetts.