Brest, Belarus

BrestBrest-LitovskBrześćBriskBrześć nad BugiemBrzesc nad BugiemBrześć LitewskiBrest LitovskBrzescBrest-on-the-Bug
Brest (Брэст,, Brześć, Brasta, Берестя Berestia, בריסק Brisk), formerly Brest-Litowsk (Берасце, Берасце Літоўскі (Брэст-Лiтоўск); Lietuvos Brasta; Brześć Litewski) (Brest-on-the-Bug Brześć nad Bugiem), is a city (population 347,576 in 2018) in Belarus at the border with Poland opposite the Polish city of Terespol, where the Bug and Mukhavets rivers meet.wikipedia
1,180 Related Articles

Brest Region

Brest VoblastBrest OblastBrest
It is the capital city of the Brest Region.
Its administrative center is Brest.

Terespol

Brest (Брэст,, Brześć, Brasta, Берестя Berestia, בריסק Brisk), formerly Brest-Litowsk (Берасце, Берасце Літоўскі (Брэст-Лiтоўск); Lietuvos Brasta; Brześć Litewski) (Brest-on-the-Bug Brześć nad Bugiem), is a city (population 347,576 in 2018) in Belarus at the border with Poland opposite the Polish city of Terespol, where the Bug and Mukhavets rivers meet. On September 19, 1794 the area between Brest and Terespol was the scene of a victorious battle won by the invading Russian Imperial army under Suvorov over the Kościuszko Uprising army division under general Karol Sierakowski (known in Russian sources as the Battle of Brest).
It lies on the border river Bug, directly opposite the city of Brest, Belarus.

Treaty of Brest-Litovsk

Brest-Litovsk TreatyBrest-LitovskPeace of Brest-Litovsk
It was the location of important historical events such as the Union of Brest and Treaty of Brest-Litovsk.
The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk (also known as the Brest Peace in Russia) was a peace treaty signed on March 3, 1918 between the new Bolshevik government of Russia and the Central Powers (German Empire, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire), that ended Russia's participation in World War I. The treaty was signed at German-controlled Brest-Litovsk (Brześć Litewski; since 1945, Brest, nowadays in Belarus), after two months of negotiations.

Mukhavets River

MukhavetsMuchawiecMukhovets
Brest (Брэст,, Brześć, Brasta, Берестя Berestia, בריסק Brisk), formerly Brest-Litowsk (Берасце, Берасце Літоўскі (Брэст-Лiтоўск); Lietuvos Brasta; Brześć Litewski) (Brest-on-the-Bug Brześć nad Bugiem), is a city (population 347,576 in 2018) in Belarus at the border with Poland opposite the Polish city of Terespol, where the Bug and Mukhavets rivers meet.
The river rises in Pruzhany, Belarus, where the Mukha river and the Viets canal converge, flows in the south-western Belarus and empties into the Bug River in Brest.

Union of Brest

1596Brest UnionUniate Church
It was the location of important historical events such as the Union of Brest and Treaty of Brest-Litovsk.
After leaving of Jeremias II, in 1590 four out of nine bishops of the Ruthenian Orthodox Church (Vilnius) gathered in synod in the city of Brest and signed a declaration of their readiness to sign the union with Rome composed 33 articles of Union, which were accepted by the Pope of Rome.

Brześć Kujawski

Brest KujawskiBrzesk
In the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth formed in 1569 the town became known in Polish as Brześć, historically Brześć Litewski (literally: "Lithuanian Brest", in contradistinction to Brześć Kujawski).
The name Brześć comes from the word Brzost, which is a species of elm that the area was originally covered in, while the name Kujawski is derived from the region of Kuyavia and was assigned to distinguish the town from Brześć Litewski, the capital of the Brest Region.

Polish language

PolishplPolish-language
In the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth formed in 1569 the town became known in Polish as Brześć, historically Brześć Litewski (literally: "Lithuanian Brest", in contradistinction to Brześć Kujawski).
In Ukraine, it is most common in western Lviv and Volyn Oblasts, while in West Belarus it is used by the significant Polish minority, especially in the Brest and Grodno regions and in areas along the Lithuanian border.

Hero Fortress

Hero-FortressBrest fortress
The Brest Fortress was recognized by the Soviet Union as the Hero Fortress in honor of the defense of Brest Fortress in June 1941.
Hero Fortress (Russian: крепость-герой, krepost'-geroy) is the honorary title awarded to the Soviet Brest Fortress, now in Brest, Belarus (then part of the Byelorussian SSR) in 1965 for the defence of the frontier stronghold during the very first weeks of the German-Soviet War of 1941 to 1945.

Brest Castle (Belarus)

Brest Castle
In an attack from the other direction, on January 13, 1660 the invading Muscovite Russian army under Ivan Andreyevich Khovansky took the Brest Castle in a surprise early morning attack, the town having been captured earlier, and massacred the 1,700 defenders and their families (according to captain Rosestein, Austrian observer).
Brest Castle was evolving in the course of several centuries from the Slavonic fortified settlement Berestye that had appeared at the turn of the 10th and 11th centuries at the confluence of the Mukhavets River into the Bug River, amid islands, formed by the rivers.

Belarus

BLRRepublic of BelarusBelorussia
Brest (Брэст,, Brześć, Brasta, Берестя Berestia, בריסק Brisk), formerly Brest-Litowsk (Берасце, Берасце Літоўскі (Брэст-Лiтоўск); Lietuvos Brasta; Brześć Litewski) (Brest-on-the-Bug Brześć nad Bugiem), is a city (population 347,576 in 2018) in Belarus at the border with Poland opposite the Polish city of Terespol, where the Bug and Mukhavets rivers meet.
The climate features mild to cold winters, with average January minimum temperatures ranging from -4 °C in southwest (Brest) to -8 °C in northeast (Vitebsk), and cool and moist summers with an average temperature of 18 °C.

Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic

Belarusian SSRByelorussian SSRBelorussian SSR
The city was part of the Belarusian SSR until the breakup of the USSR in 1991.
Although German espionage played a key role in bringing the October Revolution to Russia, and one of the first decrees issued by the new government was the Decree on Peace de facto fulfilling the promise of ending Russia's role in World War I, the Russo-German front in Belarus remained static since 1915 and formal negotiations began only on 19 November (2 December N.S.), when the Soviet delegation traveled to the German-occupied Belarusian city of Brest-Litoŭsk.

Brest Fortress

Brest-Litovsk fortressBrest-Litovskfortress
The Brest Fortress was recognized by the Soviet Union as the Hero Fortress in honor of the defense of Brest Fortress in June 1941.
Brest Fortress (Брэсцкая крэпасць, '; Брестская крепость, '; Twierdza brzeska), formerly known as Brest-Litovsk Fortress, is a 19th-century Russian fortress in Brest, Belarus.

Battle of Brest (1794)

Battle of BrestBattle of TerespolTerespol
On September 19, 1794 the area between Brest and Terespol was the scene of a victorious battle won by the invading Russian Imperial army under Suvorov over the Kościuszko Uprising army division under general Karol Sierakowski (known in Russian sources as the Battle of Brest).
The Battle of Brest (referred to by Polish historians as "Bitwa pod Terespolem" (Battle near Terespol)) was a battle between Russian imperial forces and Polish rebels south-west of Brest (near the village of Terespol), present-day Belarus, on 19 September 1794.

Battle of Brześć Litewski

Battle of Brześćattack on Brest LitovskBattle of Brest-Litovsk
After four days of heavy fighting the Polish forces withdrew southwards on September 17 (see: Battle of Brześć Litewski).
The Battle of Brześć Litewski (also known as the Siege of Brześć, Battle of Brest-Litovsk or simply Battle of Brześć) was a World War II battle involving German and Polish forces that took place between 14 and 17 September 1939, near the town of Brześć Litewski (now Brest, Belarus).

German–Soviet military parade in Brest-Litovsk

a joint military paradea joint victory paradeGerman-Soviet military parade in Brest-Litovsk
The Soviet invasion of Poland began on the same day and as a result the Soviet Red Army entered the city at the end of September 1939 in accordance with the Ribbentrop-Molotov pact's Secret Protocol, and a joint Nazi-Soviet military parade took place on September 22, 1939.
The German–Soviet military parade in Brest-Litovsk (Deutsch-sowjetische Siegesparade in Brest-Litowsk, Совместный парад вермахта и РККА в Бресте) was an official ceremony held by the troops of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union on September 22, 1939, during the invasion of Poland in the city of Brest-Litovsk (Brześć nad Bugiem or Brześć Litewski, then in the Second Polish Republic, now Brest in Belarus).

Polesie Voivodeship

PolesiePolesie Voivodshippoleskie
It was renamed Brześć nad Bugiem on March 20, 1923 (Brest on the Bug) in Poland, and named the capital of the Polesie Voivodeship in accordance of the pre-1795 tradition.
The provincial capital of the Polesie Voivodeship, and also the largest city was Brześć nad Bugiem (Brest-on-the-Bug) with some 48,000 inhabitants (1931).

Brześć Ghetto

Brest GhettoBrześćBrześć (Brest-Litovsk) Ghetto
The remaining municipal Jewish population (about 20,000) was sequestered in the Brest ghetto established by the German authorities in December 1941, which they liquidated in October 1942.
Less than a year after the creation of the ghetto, around 1942, most of approximately 20,000 Jewish inhabitants of Brest (Brześć) were murdered; over 5,000 were executed locally at the Brest Fortress on the orders of Karl Eberhard Schöngarth; the rest in the secluded forest of the Bronna Góra extermination site (the Bronna Mount, Бронная гара), sent there aboard Holocaust trains under the guise of 'resettlement'.

Bug River

BugWestern BugBug rivers
Brest (Брэст,, Brześć, Brasta, Берестя Berestia, בריסק Brisk), formerly Brest-Litowsk (Берасце, Берасце Літоўскі (Брэст-Лiтоўск); Lietuvos Brasta; Brześć Litewski) (Brest-on-the-Bug Brześć nad Bugiem), is a city (population 347,576 in 2018) in Belarus at the border with Poland opposite the Polish city of Terespol, where the Bug and Mukhavets rivers meet.
The largest spring flood was observed in 1979, when the maximum water discharge was 19.1 cubic metres per second on 24 March 1979, at the village of Chersk; 166 cubic metres per second near the village of Tyukhinichi (Lyasnaya river) on 31 March 1979; and 269 cubic metres per second near Brest on 1 April 1979.

Ukrainian People's Republic

Ukrainian National RepublicUkraineUNR
During 1918, the city became a part of the Podolia Governorate of the Ukrainian People's Republic as a result of negotiations and own treaty between delegation of the Ukrainian Central Rada and Central Powers.

Second Polish Republic

PolandPolishinterwar Poland
After World War I, the city returned to Second Polish Republic.

Brest-Tsentralny railway station

BrestBrest-Tsentralny
The city of Brest is served by Brest-Tsentralny railway station.
Brest-Tsentralny is the main railway station of Brest, Belarus.

Invasion of Poland

German invasion of Polandinvaded PolandSeptember Campaign
During the Invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union in 1939, the city was first captured by the Wehrmacht and soon passed on to the USSR in accordance with the German–Soviet Frontier Treaty. During the German Invasion of Poland in 1939 the city was defended by a small garrison of four infantry battalions under General Konstanty Plisowski against the XIX Panzer Corps of General Heinz Guderian.
The most remarkable event of this kind occurred at Brest-Litovsk on 22 September.

Brest City Park

Brest City Park is over 100 years old, and underwent renovations from 2004 to 2006 as part of a ceremony marking the park's centennial.
Brest City Park is an urban public park in Brest, Belarus.

Heinz Guderian

GuderianGeneral Heinz GuderianGuderian, Heinz
During the German Invasion of Poland in 1939 the city was defended by a small garrison of four infantry battalions under General Konstanty Plisowski against the XIX Panzer Corps of General Heinz Guderian.
On 9 September his corps was reinforced by 10 Panzer Division and he continued deeper into Poland, finishing at Brest-Litovsk.

Konstanty Plisowski

Plisowski
During the German Invasion of Poland in 1939 the city was defended by a small garrison of four infantry battalions under General Konstanty Plisowski against the XIX Panzer Corps of General Heinz Guderian.
During the Polish Defensive War of 1939 Plisowski found himself in Brześć, where he volunteered for the army.