Bridge (nautical)

bridgepilothousebridge wingpilot housewheelhousebridgeswheel housecompass platformnavigation bridgebridge deck
The bridge of a ship is the room or platform from which the ship can be commanded.wikipedia
1,247 Related Articles

Watchkeeping

watchwatch officerofficer of the watch
When a ship is under way, the bridge is manned by an officer of the watch aided usually by an able seaman acting as lookout.
On a typical seafaring vessel, be it naval or merchant, personnel "keep watch" in various locations and duties across the ship, such as the bridge and engine room.

Quarterdeck

QDquarter deckquarter-deck
Traditionally, sailing ships were commanded from the quarterdeck, aft of the mainmast, where the ship's wheel was located (as it was close to the rudder).
Underway, its importance diminishes as control of the ship is transferred to the bridge.

Engine order telegraph

telegraphchadburnship's telegraph
Engine commands would be relayed to the engine officer in the engine room by an engine order telegraph that displayed the captain's orders on a dial.
An engine order telegraph or E.O.T., also referred to as a chadburn, is a communications device used on a ship (or submarine) for the pilot on the bridge to order engineers in the engine room to power the vessel at a certain desired speed.

Navigation system

navigationnavigation devicenavigational system
On a commercial vessel, the bridge will contain the equipment necessary to safely navigate a vessel on passage.
Navigation systems may be entirely on board a vehicle or vessel (on the ships) bridge, or they may be located elsewhere and communicate via radio or other signals with a vehicle or vessel, or they may use a combination of these methods.

Flying bridge

flybridgeFly Bridge/Flying Bridgeflybridge yachts
Many ships still have a flying bridge, a platform atop the pilot house, open to weather, containing a binnacle and voice tubes to allow the conning officer to direct the ship from a higher position during fair weather conditions.
Prior to World War II, virtually every sailing ship, steamship, monitor, paddle steamer, or large pleasure ship had a flying bridge above the pilot house or main bridge.

Conning tower

Towerconningconning station
In older warships, a heavily armored conning tower was often provided, where the vital command staff could be located under protection to ensure that the ship could be commanded under fire.
At all other times than during battles, the ship would be navigated from the bridge.

Able seaman

able seamendeckhandable-bodied seaman
When a ship is under way, the bridge is manned by an officer of the watch aided usually by an able seaman acting as lookout.

Deck department

deck officerDeck Officersdeck
Officers use bridge wings when docking or maneuvering in locks and narrow waterways.
Seafarers in the deck department work a variety of jobs on a ship or vessel, but primarily they will carry out the navigation of a vessel, from the bridge.

Course (navigation)

courseheadingcourses
It includes a table sized for nautical charts where calculations of course and location are made.

Nautical chart

chartschartnautical charts
It includes a table sized for nautical charts where calculations of course and location are made.

Ship

shipsvesselsvessel
When a ship is under way, the bridge is manned by an officer of the watch aided usually by an able seaman acting as lookout. The bridge of a ship is the room or platform from which the ship can be commanded.

Lookout

look-outlook-out houselook-out position
When a ship is under way, the bridge is manned by an officer of the watch aided usually by an able seaman acting as lookout.

Captain (naval)

CaptainCapt.captains
During critical maneuvers the captain will be on the bridge, often supported by an officer of the watch, an able seaman on the wheel and sometimes a pilot, if required.

Sailing ship

sailing shipssailing vesselsailing vessels
Traditionally, sailing ships were commanded from the quarterdeck, aft of the mainmast, where the ship's wheel was located (as it was close to the rudder).

Mast (sailing)

mastmastsmainmast
Traditionally, sailing ships were commanded from the quarterdeck, aft of the mainmast, where the ship's wheel was located (as it was close to the rudder).

Ship's wheel

wheelhelmsteering wheel
Traditionally, sailing ships were commanded from the quarterdeck, aft of the mainmast, where the ship's wheel was located (as it was close to the rudder). Helm orders would be passed to an enclosed wheel house, where the coxswain or helmsman operated the ship's wheel.

Rudder

ruddersrudder poststern rudder
Traditionally, sailing ships were commanded from the quarterdeck, aft of the mainmast, where the ship's wheel was located (as it was close to the rudder).

Paddle steamer

sternwheelersidewheelsidewheel steamer
With the arrival of paddle steamers, engineers required a platform from which they could inspect the paddle wheels and where the captain's view would not be obstructed by the paddle houses.

Sea captain

captainmasterskipper
With the arrival of paddle steamers, engineers required a platform from which they could inspect the paddle wheels and where the captain's view would not be obstructed by the paddle houses.

Propeller

screwscrew propellerscrews
When the screw propeller superseded the paddle wheel, the term "bridge" survived.

Tugboat

tugtugstug boat
On modern ships the wheelhouse or pilothouse refers to the bridge of smaller motor vessels, such as tugs.

Steering

four-wheel steeringfour wheel steeringsteer
Helm orders would be passed to an enclosed wheel house, where the coxswain or helmsman operated the ship's wheel.

Coxswain

coxcoxswainscoxwain
Helm orders would be passed to an enclosed wheel house, where the coxswain or helmsman operated the ship's wheel.

Helmsman

helmhelmsmenwheelsman
Helm orders would be passed to an enclosed wheel house, where the coxswain or helmsman operated the ship's wheel.

Engine officer

marine engineerengineerengineering officer
Engine commands would be relayed to the engine officer in the engine room by an engine order telegraph that displayed the captain's orders on a dial.