British America

English AmericaAmerican coloniesAmericaBritishNorth AmericaAmericanBritish North AmericaEnglishthe coloniesBritish colonies
British America included the British Empire's colonial territories in America from 1607 to 1783.wikipedia
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Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
These colonies were formally known as British America and the British West Indies before the Thirteen Colonies declared their independence in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) and formed the United States of America.
They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada, Florida, and the Caribbean.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
British America gained large amounts of new territory following the Treaty of Paris (1763) which ended the French and Indian War in America, and ended British involvement in the Seven Years' War in Europe.
The French and Indian War (1754–1763) pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies.

Great Britain in the Seven Years' War

Great Britain in the Seven Years WarAnnus Mirabilis of 1759Annus Mirabilis
British America gained large amounts of new territory following the Treaty of Paris (1763) which ended the French and Indian War in America, and ended British involvement in the Seven Years' War in Europe.
It also directed the military strategy of its various colonies around the world including British America.

Plymouth Colony

PlymouthPlymouth PlantationColony of New-Plimouth
This was followed in 1620 when the Pilgrims established the Plymouth settlement in New England.
Plymouth Colony (sometimes Plymouth) was an English colonial venture in America from 1620 to 1691 at a location that had previously been surveyed and named by Captain John Smith.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
British America included the British Empire's colonial territories in America from 1607 to 1783.
The loss of such a large portion of British America, at the time Britain's most populous overseas possession, is seen by some historians as the event defining the transition between the "first" and "second" empires, in which Britain shifted its attention away from the Americas to Asia, the Pacific and later Africa.

New England Colonies

colonial New EnglandNew EnglandNew England colonists
The New England Colonies of British America included Connecticut Colony, the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Massachusetts Bay Colony, and the Province of New Hampshire, Maine (which was part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony at the time)as well as a few smaller short-lived colonies.

Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

Rhode IslandColony of Rhode IslandRhode Island Colony
It was an English colony from 1636 until 1707, and then a colony of Great Britain until the American Revolution in 1776, when it became the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (commonly known simply as Rhode Island).

Middle Colonies

MiddleMid-Atlantic Colonies
The Middle Colonies were a subset of the thirteen colonies in British America, located between the New England Colonies and the Southern Colonies.

Southern Colonies

British coloniesSouthSouthern
The Southern Colonies within British America consisted of the Province of Maryland, the Colony of Virginia,

Province of Georgia

GeorgiaColony of GeorgiaGeorgia colony
The Province of Georgia (also Georgia Colony) was one of the Southern colonies in British America.

Province of South Carolina

South Carolinacolonial South Carolinacolony of South Carolina
The Province of South Carolina (also known as the South Carolina Colony) was originally part of the Province of Carolina in British America, which was chartered by eight Lords Proprietor in 1663.

British North America

BritishNorth AmericaBritish North American
After that, the term British North America described the remainder of Great Britain's continental American possessions.

British colonization of the Americas

BritishEnglishEnglish colonization of the Americas
The loss of a large portion of British America is seen by some historians as the event defining the transition between the "first" and "second" empires, in which Britain shifted its attention away from the Americas to Asia, the Pacific, and later Africa.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
These colonies were formally known as British America and the British West Indies before the Thirteen Colonies declared their independence in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) and formed the United States of America.

Report on the Affairs of British North America

Durham ReportLord Durham's ReportHis report
That term was used informally in 1783 by the end of the American Revolution, but it was uncommon before the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), called the Durham Report.

Treaty of Paris (1763)

Treaty of Paris1763 Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 1763
British America gained large amounts of new territory following the Treaty of Paris (1763) which ended the French and Indian War in America, and ended British involvement in the Seven Years' War in Europe.

New Spain

Viceroyalty of New SpainSpanishNueva España
At the start of the Revolutionary War in 1775, the British Empire included 20 colonies north and east of New Spain.

East Florida

EastBritish East FloridaEastern Florida
(New Spain included areas of Mexico and the western United States.) Britain ceded East and West Florida to the Kingdom of Spain in the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the American Revolution, and then Spain ceded them to the United States in 1819 after treaty negotiations to settle the old southwest border with Spanish Florida (eastern Louisiana, southern Alabama, Mississippi, and western Georgia).

West Florida

Florida OccidentalColony of West FloridaWestern Florida
(New Spain included areas of Mexico and the western United States.) Britain ceded East and West Florida to the Kingdom of Spain in the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the American Revolution, and then Spain ceded them to the United States in 1819 after treaty negotiations to settle the old southwest border with Spanish Florida (eastern Louisiana, southern Alabama, Mississippi, and western Georgia).

Treaty of Paris (1783)

Treaty of Paris1783 Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 1783
(New Spain included areas of Mexico and the western United States.) Britain ceded East and West Florida to the Kingdom of Spain in the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the American Revolution, and then Spain ceded them to the United States in 1819 after treaty negotiations to settle the old southwest border with Spanish Florida (eastern Louisiana, southern Alabama, Mississippi, and western Georgia).

Spanish Florida

FloridaLa FloridaSecond Spanish Period
(New Spain included areas of Mexico and the western United States.) Britain ceded East and West Florida to the Kingdom of Spain in the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the American Revolution, and then Spain ceded them to the United States in 1819 after treaty negotiations to settle the old southwest border with Spanish Florida (eastern Louisiana, southern Alabama, Mississippi, and western Georgia).

Dominion of Newfoundland

NewfoundlanddominionBritish dominion
The Dominion of Newfoundland to the east joined Canada in 1949.

Charles I of England

Charles IKing Charles IKing Charles
They were granted commercial charters by King James I, King Charles I, Parliament, and King Charles II.

Charles II of England

Charles IIKing Charles IIKing Charles II of England
They were granted commercial charters by King James I, King Charles I, Parliament, and King Charles II.