British Hong Kong

Hong KongBritish ruleBritish administrationcolonial Hong Kongcolonial periodBritish colony of Hong KongBritish colonial ruleBritish colonyBritish colonialcolonial government
British Hong Kong denotes the period during which Hong Kong was governed as a colony and British Dependent Territory of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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Handover of Hong Kong

transfer of sovereignty over Hong Konghandovertransfer of sovereignty
Although Hong Kong Island and Kowloon were ceded in perpetuity, the leased area, which comprised 92 per cent of the territory, was vital to the integrity of Hong Kong that Britain agreed to transfer the entire colony to China upon the expiration of that lease in 1997.
The transfer of sovereignty over Hong Kong, commonly known as the handover of Hong Kong (or simply "the Handover", also "the Return" in mainland China and Hong Kong) was the transformation of control over the United Kingdom's then colony of Hong Kong, pursuant to which it ceased to be a British Dependent Territory and became instead a special administrative region of the People's Republic of China on 1 July 1997.

Charles Elliot

Sir Charles ElliotAdmiral Sir Charles ElliotElliot, Charles
Chief Superintendent of Trade, Charles Elliot, complied with Lin's demands to secure a safe exit for the British, with the costs involved to be resolved between the two governments.
He became the first Administrator of Hong Kong in 1841 while serving as both Plenipotentiary and Chief Superintendent of British Trade in China.

Crown colony

crown coloniesBritish coloniesBritish crown colony
The island was ceded by Qing China in the aftermath of the war in 1842 and established as a Crown colony in 1843. Hong Kong was ceded in the Treaty of Nanking on 29 August 1842 and established as a Crown colony after ratification was exchanged on 26 June 1843.
Crown colonies with nominated councils such as British Honduras, Sierra Leone, Grenada and Hong Kong were staffed entirely by Crown-appointed members, with some appointed representation from the local population.

Governor of Hong Kong

GovernorHong Kong GovernorGovernor and Commander-in-Chief, Hong Kong
Parkes and Sir John Bowring, the 4th Governor of Hong Kong, seized the incident to pursue a forward policy.
The Governor of Hong Kong was the representative in Hong Kong of the British Crown from 1843 to 1997.

New Territories

NTN.T.New Territories East
The colony expanded to the Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 after the Second Opium War and was further extended when Britain obtained a 99-year lease of the New Territories in 1898.
The additional land was estimated to be 365 square miles (945 km 2 ) or 12 times the size of the existing Colonial Hong Kong at the time.

Treaty of Nanking

Treaty of NanjingNankingcession of Hong Kong
Hong Kong was ceded in the Treaty of Nanking on 29 August 1842 and established as a Crown colony after ratification was exchanged on 26 June 1843.
Ratification was exchanged in Hong Kong on 26 June 1843.

James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin

Lord ElginThe Earl of ElginJames Bruce
In March 1857, Palmerston appointed Lord Elgin as Plenipotentiary with the aim of securing a new and satisfactory treaty.
Subsequently, he submitted the Qing Dynasty to the unequal treaty of the Convention of Peking, adding Kowloon Peninsula to the British crown colony of Hong Kong.

Possession Point

occupied Hong Kong
Commodore Gordon Bremer, commander-in-chief of British forces in China, took formal possession of the island at Possession Point, where the Union Jack was raised under a feu de joie from the marines and a royal salute from the warships.
The area is where Commodore James Bremer, commander-in-chief of British forces in China, took formal possession of Hong Kong on 26 January 1841.

Battle of Hong Kong

Hong KongJapanese invasionJapanese invasion of Hong Kong
On 8 December, the Battle of Hong Kong began when Japanese air bombers effectively destroyed British air power in one attack.
On the same morning as the attack on Pearl Harbor, forces of the Empire of Japan attacked the British Crown colony of Hong Kong.

Young Plan (Hong Kong)

Young Planplan of constitutional reformpolitical reforms
Young, upon his return as governor in May 1946, pursued political reform known as the "Young Plan", believing that, to counter the Chinese government's determination to recover Hong Kong, it was necessary to give local inhabitants a greater stake in the territory by widening the political franchise to include them.
The Young Plan was a constitutional reform proposal carried out in 1946 attempting to introduce representative democracy in Colonial Hong Kong.

The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation

HSBCHongkong and Shanghai Banking CorporationHongkong and Shanghai Bank
The list included Hong Kong government officials, members of the Legislative and Executive Councils, chairmen of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation and Standard Chartered Bank, Hong Kong celebrities such as Li Ka-shing, Pao Yue-kong and Fok Ying-tung, and also Martin Lee Chu-ming and Szeto Wah.
"The Hongkong and Shanghai Bank" was established in British Hong Kong in 1865 and was incorporated as "The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation" in 1866, and has been based in Hong Kong (although now as a subsidiary) ever since.

One country, two systems

independence of legal systemone country two systemsspecial status
In accordance with the One Country, Two Systems principle agreed between the United Kingdom and the People's Republic of China, the socialist system of People's Republic of China would not be practised in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR), and Hong Kong's previous capitalist system and its way of life would remain unchanged for a period of 50 years.
Hong Kong was a colony of the United Kingdom, ruled by a governor for 156 years (except for four years of Japanese occupation during WWII) until 1997, when it was returned to Chinese sovereignty.

Chiang Kai-shek

Chiang Kai ShekChiangPresident Chiang Kai-shek
In 1941, during the Second World War, the British reached an agreement with the Chinese government under Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek that if Japan attacked Hong Kong, the Chinese National Army would attack the Japanese from the rear to relieve pressure on the British garrison.
They abandoned their attacks on Chen on August 9, taking a British ship to Hong Kong and traveling to Shanghai by steamer.

Kuomintang

NationalistnationalistsKMT
With the surrender of Japan, the transition back to British rule was smooth, for on the mainland the Nationalist and Communist forces were preparing for a civil war and ignored Hong Kong.
Unlike Sun Yat-sen, whom he admired greatly, and who forged all his political, economic and revolutionary ideas primarily from what he had learned in Hawaii and indirectly through British Hong Kong and Empire of Japan under Meiji Restoration, Chiang knew relatively little about the West.

Kowloon Peninsula

Kowloon
The colony expanded to the Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 after the Second Opium War and was further extended when Britain obtained a 99-year lease of the New Territories in 1898.
In 1898 a resolution was passed by the Colonial Hong Kong Legislative Council to preserve the land where some of the caves stand.

Government House, Hong Kong

Government HouseBritish Government HouseGovernment House of Hong Kong
He formally accepted the Japanese surrender on 16 September in Government House.
Government House was the official residence of the Governor from 1855 to 1997, when the city was under British rule.

Hong Kong

🇭🇰HKGHong Kong SAR
British Hong Kong denotes the period during which Hong Kong was governed as a colony and British Dependent Territory of the United Kingdom.
Hong Kong became a colony of the British Empire after Qing China ceded Hong Kong Island at the end of the First Opium War in 1842.

Second Opium War

Second Anglo-Chinese WarSecond China WarArrow War
The colony expanded to the Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 after the Second Opium War and was further extended when Britain obtained a 99-year lease of the New Territories in 1898.

Legislative Council of Hong Kong

Legislative CouncilLegcoLegislative Councillor
Executive power was highly concentrated with the Governor, who himself appointed almost all members of the Legislative Council and Executive Council and also served as President of both chambers.
foundation = June 26, 1843 (Colonial)

Executive Council of Hong Kong

Executive CouncilExecutiveHong Kong Executive Council
Executive power was highly concentrated with the Governor, who himself appointed almost all members of the Legislative Council and Executive Council and also served as President of both chambers.
The Executive Council was set up by the British Hong Kong Government.

Hong Kong 1967 leftist riots

1967 riots1967 Leftist riotsleftist riots
The 1966 riots and Maoist-led 1967 riots, essentially spillovers from the Cultural Revolution, were large scale demonstrations fuelled by tensions surrounding labour disputes and dissatisfaction towards the government.
While originating as a minor labour dispute, the tensions later grew into large scale demonstrations against British colonial rule.

Hong Kong 1966 riots

1966 Kowloon riots1966 riots1966
The 1966 riots and Maoist-led 1967 riots, essentially spillovers from the Cultural Revolution, were large scale demonstrations fuelled by tensions surrounding labour disputes and dissatisfaction towards the government.
The riots started as peaceful demonstrations against the British colonial government's decision to increase the fare of Star Ferry foot-passenger harbour crossing by 25 percent.

Steve Tsang

Tsang, Steve
Historian Steve Tsang wrote that it was "ironic" that despite Hong Kong being a symbol of China's humiliation by Britain, there was not one major movement started by the Chinese residents of the colony for its retrocession to China, even though there had been several upsurges of Chinese nationalism.
Born in Hong Kong, Tsang received a B.A. at the University of Hong Kong in 1981 and D.Phil at St Antony's College, Oxford in 1986.

Hercules Robinson, 1st Baron Rosmead

Sir Hercules RobinsonHercules RobinsonHercules Robinson, Lord Rosmead
In 1861, Governor Sir Hercules Robinson introduced the Hong Kong Cadetship, which recruited young graduates from Britain to learn Cantonese and written Chinese for two years, before deploying them on a fast track to the Civil Service.
Up to this point, the Colony of Hong Kong only consisted of Hong Kong Island.

Canton–Hong Kong strike

1925 Canton–Hong Kong General Strike1925 strikeCanton-Hong Kong strikes of 1925 and 1926
The Canton–Hong Kong strike (1925–1926) was anti-imperialist in nature.
The Canton–Hong Kong strike was a strike and boycott that took place in British Hong Kong and Canton (now Guangzhou), Republic of China, from June 1925 to October 1926.